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DESNOROLATOR

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Re: DESNOROLATOR

Postby Slava » Tue Dec 11, 2012 11:03 pm

bamaboy56 wrote:Good to know the CPAP does not require exclusively sleeping on your back. For as long as I can remember I have always awoke laying (lying?) ....

Without question, unless you are a truly talented hen, able to peck out particularly pertinent posts to the always amazing Alpha Agora, you are most definitely not laying.
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Re: DESNOROLATOR

Postby Perry Lassiter » Tue Dec 11, 2012 11:13 pm

Note this is a very democratic board. A word invented three months ago by a seven year old has struck serious comments into the second page! Doc, see if Abigail has any more creative terminology!
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Re: DESNOROLATOR

Postby bamaboy56 » Wed Dec 12, 2012 9:41 pm

Thanks, Slava, for giving me an easy way to resolve the laying/lying dilemma I usually have. Don't know why but I draw a blank with this word.
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Re: DESNOROLATOR

Postby Dr. Goodword » Thu Dec 13, 2012 12:04 am

What happens is that as your body tissues loses tone from aging, the soft palate does not escape this process. When it softens to a certain point, it begins to vibrate, resulting in snoring.

When it gets soft enough, it can plug up your pharynx, so you can't breathe. This is sleep apnia. You wake up realizing that you have not been breathing for some time, gasping for breath (if you wake up).
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Re: DESNOROLATOR

Postby Philip Hudson » Thu Dec 13, 2012 12:39 am

Slava: Is the truly talented hen you mentioned a disciple of Skinner?
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Re: DESNOROLATOR

Postby Slava » Thu Dec 13, 2012 1:27 am

Philip Hudson wrote:Slava: Is the truly talented hen you mentioned a disciple of Skinner?

I'm lost. No clue as to the reference. The name, okay, but what it means here: eh?
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Re: DESNOROLATOR

Postby Slava » Thu Dec 13, 2012 1:30 am

Dr. Goodword wrote:What happens is that as your body tissues loses tone from aging, the soft palate does not escape this process. When it softens to a certain point, it begins to vibrate, resulting in snoring.

When it gets soft enough, it can plug up your pharynx, so you can't breathe. This is sleep apnia. You wake up realizing that you have not been breathing for some time, gasping for breath (if you wake up).
I do know this one. The panic attack of believing you aren't breathing really rots. However, I do believe the term is apnea. Phonetic spelling trips up even the best of us, no?
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Re: DESNOROLATOR

Postby wurdpurrson » Thu Dec 13, 2012 3:42 am

Another way to remember the "lie/lay" rule, is that lay (besides meaning a hen depositing an egg) means to put or place something: you lay the book or pencil down; you can also lay your body down (a somewhat poetic reference), but in the physical act of changing position, you lie down. By the same token, a person reclining beside the road is lying down, not laying - unless that person is extremely unusual and a chimera of human and hen.

When people training dogs tell them to "Lay down!" it makes me cringe...
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Re: DESNOROLATOR

Postby Slava » Thu Dec 13, 2012 4:20 pm

Poetic license plays a role in the confusion, too.

"Now I lay me down to sleep..."
"Lay, Lady, Lay..."

And, of course, the past tense of lie is lay, so that just adds to the mess.
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Re: DESNOROLATOR

Postby bamaboy56 » Thu Dec 13, 2012 5:36 pm

Thanks Slava and Wurdpurrson for making the lie/lay situation clearer. Maybe lay being the past tense of lie is what keeps throwing me. MORE proof that English is a difficult language to learn! I agree with Perry, Doc, keep speaking to Abigail and get some more interesting terminology from her! Also, Doc, unfortunately my soft palate is not the only thing getting soft as I age. :oops: :D Sad I'm finding more and more saggy places as I go along. :cry:
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Re: DESNOROLATOR

Postby Perry Lassiter » Thu Dec 13, 2012 7:58 pm

"Pharynx" triggered snother thought. I wonder why so many people pronounce it fair-nix?
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Re: DESNOROLATOR

Postby wurdpurrson » Thu Dec 13, 2012 8:29 pm

They confuse it with phoenix? Some are just too verbally lazy to pay attention to how a word is actually spelled, I think. There's lots of common errors like that in Speakers of Their Own English Language.
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Re: DESNOROLATOR

Postby Philip Hudson » Thu Dec 13, 2012 11:22 pm

Slava: Re your talented hen. I refer to the behaviorist, Skinner, who trained hens to peck out a certain tattoo on the floor of their cages in order to get food.
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Re: DESNOROLATOR

Postby Slava » Thu Dec 13, 2012 11:52 pm

Philip Hudson wrote:Slava: Re your talented hen. I refer to the behaviorist, Skinner, who trained hens to peck out a certain tattoo on the floor of their cages in order to get food.

Aha, thank you for the explanation. I now understand that to get fed, they needed to lay down a specific tune. Rock on, chicks!
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Re: DESNOROLATOR

Postby Philip Hudson » Fri Dec 14, 2012 12:34 am

It gives "sing for her supper" a different twist.
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