Alphadictionary.com

Our Sponsors

Technical Translation
Website Translation Clip Art
 

PANACHE

Use this forum to discuss past Good Words.

PANACHE

Postby Dr. Goodword » Sun Jan 13, 2013 11:17 pm

• panache •


Pronunciation: pê-næshHear it!

Part of Speech: Noun

Meaning: 1. A plume of feathers, especially in a hat or helmet. 2. Dash, flamboyance, verve.

Notes: Today's word is a near-orphan. One rarely used adjective, panached, indicates a set of multi-colored stripes, such as panached pansies, since panaches in helmets and hats were multi-colored. Don't forget that the [sh] sound comes from the French pronunciation of CHE.

In Play: In the 19th and early 20th centuries Native Americans of the plains were notable for their colorful panaches in the original sense, but Europeans of that age loved them, too: "When I was young, the most elegant of women's hats had to be adorned with remarkable panaches." The kind of panache that remains with us today is only metaphorical, "Michael Jordan not only stuffed the basketball through the net, he did it with panache."

Word History: This Good Word is simply the French word for "plume, verve" from Italian pennacchio "plume" or Spanish penacho. These two words are from Late Latin pinnaculum "little feather", the diminutive of pinna or penna "feather, wing". Pinnacle also comes from Latin pinnaculum, whose meaning had changed to "gable, small wing" just before Latin split into French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish. The Proto-Indo-European root was *pet- "feather, wing," also at the root of pen, the writing instrument which originally was a feather. Of course, the PIE [p] became [f], and [t] became [th] in English, so the same root, with the suffix -er, turns up in English as feather.
• The Good Dr. Goodword
User avatar
Dr. Goodword
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3349
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2005 9:28 am
Location: Lewisburg, PA

Re: PANACHE

Postby Perry Lassiter » Mon Jan 14, 2013 12:15 am

" just before Latin split into French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish"
Can you pin that down within a century?
pl
Perry Lassiter
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2176
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 12:41 pm
Location: RUSTON, LA

Re: PANACHE

Postby MTC » Mon Jan 14, 2013 8:29 am

Befeathered and bedizened ladies at the royal wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge, would be quite distressed to learn "(t)he kind of panache that remains with us today is only metaphorical...." Many of the ladies wore "fascinators," haute couture's latest expression of feathered "panache." You might say the ladies were the very pinnacle of fashion.

(http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/fas ... cle634468/)
MTC
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1066
Joined: Mon Apr 05, 2010 11:40 am
Location: Pasadena

Re: PANACHE

Postby LukeJavan8 » Mon Jan 14, 2013 1:33 pm

The hats of the Princesses Eugenia and Beatrice
protesting their mother's slight in the invitations
was certainly panache.
-----please, draw me a sheep-----
User avatar
LukeJavan8
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 3313
Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2009 6:16 pm
Location: Land of the Flat Water

Re: PANACHE

Postby MTC » Mon Jan 14, 2013 4:58 pm

panache: verve of the celebrity chef, e.g. Wolfgang Puck
MTC
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1066
Joined: Mon Apr 05, 2010 11:40 am
Location: Pasadena

Re: PANACHE

Postby Philip Hudson » Mon Jan 14, 2013 5:21 pm

Panache - one of Hudson's ugliest words in the English Language.
It is dark at night, but the Sun will come up and then we can see.
Philip Hudson
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1662
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2006 4:41 am
Location: Texas

Re: PANACHE

Postby LukeJavan8 » Mon Jan 14, 2013 7:28 pm

Philip Hudson wrote:Panache - one of Hudson's ugliest words in the English Language.



I'd be interested in seeing your list.
-----please, draw me a sheep-----
User avatar
LukeJavan8
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 3313
Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2009 6:16 pm
Location: Land of the Flat Water

Re: PANACHE

Postby Philip Hudson » Mon Jan 14, 2013 9:16 pm

Luke: I don't really have a list, there are just words that sound all wrong to me. Panache is one of them. Not that I have never worn a panache myself. Many people who have been in a marching band have had panaches on their band caps. I thought it was pronounced 'pan-uh-chee. How was i to know?
It is dark at night, but the Sun will come up and then we can see.
Philip Hudson
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1662
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2006 4:41 am
Location: Texas

Re: PANACHE

Postby LukeJavan8 » Tue Jan 15, 2013 1:32 pm

No biggie, just thought you might.
On these "word" sites people have all sorts of
"faves" and not so favorite.

I thought it was pronounced pan-uh-kee.
Similarly I thought riboflavin
(reading the milk carton at breakfast as a kid)
was rib-oh-flav-in. How was I to know, until one day
I said it aloud :oops:
-----please, draw me a sheep-----
User avatar
LukeJavan8
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 3313
Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2009 6:16 pm
Location: Land of the Flat Water

Re: PANACHE

Postby Philip Hudson » Sat Jan 19, 2013 2:15 am

Harry Truman had an enormous vocabulary. Not being able to associate with learned people for much of his early life, he was a master of mispronunciation.
It is dark at night, but the Sun will come up and then we can see.
Philip Hudson
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1662
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2006 4:41 am
Location: Texas

Re: PANACHE

Postby LukeJavan8 » Sat Jan 19, 2013 12:38 pm

I've heard that as well. If you are not up to looking up
every other word in the dictionary, you try to sound them
out as best you can, and hope you've got it right.
-----please, draw me a sheep-----
User avatar
LukeJavan8
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 3313
Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2009 6:16 pm
Location: Land of the Flat Water

Re: PANACHE

Postby Perry Lassiter » Sat Jan 19, 2013 12:46 pm

Taught to read by phonetics, as I was and prefer, they don't provide a place to accent them. I've noticed even doctors don't always agree on where to accent some medicines and medical terms. Is "angina" accented on the first or second syllable? Of course, Britishers and Americans vary widely, especially in the English tendency to emphasize an early syllable so the rest of the word becomes schwa-like. Keep it up, and they'll out-French the French.
pl
Perry Lassiter
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2176
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 12:41 pm
Location: RUSTON, LA

Re: PANACHE

Postby LukeJavan8 » Sat Jan 19, 2013 1:05 pm

My heart skipped a beat on that last thought ! !
-----please, draw me a sheep-----
User avatar
LukeJavan8
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 3313
Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2009 6:16 pm
Location: Land of the Flat Water

Re: PANACHE

Postby Slava » Sat Jan 19, 2013 7:34 pm

LukeJavan8 wrote:My heart skipped a beat on that last thought ! !

Was that an up-beat or a down-beat?

Bah-dah-bum!
Life is like playing chess with chessmen who each have thoughts and feelings and motives of their own.
User avatar
Slava
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 4447
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:31 am
Location: Finger Lakes, NY

Re: PANACHE

Postby LukeJavan8 » Sat Jan 19, 2013 8:56 pm

Sort of like a 'tick-tock' without the 'tock'.
-----please, draw me a sheep-----
User avatar
LukeJavan8
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 3313
Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2009 6:16 pm
Location: Land of the Flat Water


Return to Good Word Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests