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ENDEAVOR

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Re: ENDEAVOR

Postby MTC » Sat Apr 27, 2013 1:26 pm

Deliberate, Perry: "The word "duty" was coded as shown as the numbers 1–25 stood for the letters A-Z, without J."

Here is a link to the code used by Nelson at Trafalgar:
http://3decks.pbworks.com/f/Admiral%252 ... dition.pdf
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Re: ENDEAVOR

Postby call_copse » Mon Apr 29, 2013 6:13 am

Slava wrote:Various comments:

Isn't "you lot" generally considered dismissive and somewhat rude?
Not saved by the bell, but by the flag. :)
As for things Americans stand up and respect, how about "Ask not..."? Perhaps even related to "England expects."
How does "eye for an eye" fit in with these concepts? Isn't it biblical?


I would not see you lot as dismissive or rude - I apologise if it might be seen as such, no dismissiveness intended whatsoever I assure you, cross country interwebz etiquette is always tricky. Please review the following entry:

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/you_lot

For instance I might refer to another collective branch of the family as 'you lot' e.g. when will you lot be heading south for the wedding? I'd go so far as to describe it as mildly affectionate if anything.

An eye for an eye is a well known phrase you might use without completing it is the only commonality. One man's well known is another's obscurity of course. I'm sure the Kennedy quote might be a better comparison, I guess I think of England expects mainly in sporting matters in this day and age, and the USA chant is the first thing that comes to mind in that respect.
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Re: ENDEAVOR

Postby MTC » Mon Apr 29, 2013 12:35 pm

There is the innocuous "you lot," and then there is the not-so-innocuous "the lot of you." The latter expression comes up in
bonhomie like "A pox on the lot of you." For "you lot," a phrase unfamiliar in America, perhaps it's a case of guilt by association.
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Re: ENDEAVOR

Postby gailr » Mon Apr 29, 2013 2:30 pm

"You lot" is familiar to any USAian who's read the Harry Potter books. :wink:
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Re: ENDEAVOR

Postby Philip Hudson » Mon Apr 29, 2013 3:45 pm

I don't think "you lot" has made it to the American hinterland except from the Harry Potter books. I have never heard it and I am as hinter as one can be. We say y'all. Y'all is the plural of the singular you and never singular itself. It predates "youse guys" and is infinitely more refined.

Foreign words and usages sneak up on us unawares. I never thought I would use the word "guys" for an assemblage of boys or men. I now use it in a non-gender specific way. There goes the purity of my language.
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Re: ENDEAVOR

Postby Slava » Mon Apr 29, 2013 5:52 pm

Well, here's the way I think of "you lot."

"Oy, you lot, this isn't a park, get off my lawn!"

I can't even begin to seeing how y'all and youse guys could be considered synonyms.

Clothes shopping in the South:
Y'all want to try that on?
Youse guys want to try that on?
Nah.
Life is like playing chess with chessmen who each have thoughts and feelings and motives of their own.
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Re: ENDEAVOR

Postby MTC » Mon Apr 29, 2013 7:46 pm

gailr wrote:"You lot" is familiar to any USAian who's read the Harry Potter books. :wink:


Perhaps I was a little presumptious in speaking for every American. We are, after all, a diverse lot (whoops!) The fact that the phrase is unfamiliar to me does not necessarily mean it is unfamiliar to many Americans. Unfortunately, my copy of Garner's Modern American Usage is moldering in a family warehouse in Los Angeles. Garner is an unapologetic prescriptivist, but still a good reference on what is acceptable or commonly used in American English. Anyway, somebody should have sounded the alarm when the Potter books arrived: "The British are coming! The British are coming!"
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Re: ENDEAVOR

Postby call_copse » Tue Apr 30, 2013 6:37 am

I'm fairly certain you lot is pretty neutral at least in the UK. Were you clearing miscreants from your lawn you would only use 'you lot' were they known to you IMHO, rather than a random assemblage, to which you would use more considered language. In terms of collective references 'you people' or 'your type' would clearly be far more pointed.

On the 'England expects...' thing I did a quick straw poll in the office and 2 out of 10 had no idea what I was on about - and these are educated types. Goes to show what I know - never expect anything and you won't be disappointed.
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Re: ENDEAVOR

Postby Perry Lassiter » Tue Apr 30, 2013 10:25 am

Never expect anything, while all England expects?! Shame!
:)
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Re: ENDEAVOR

Postby misterdoe » Thu May 23, 2013 12:42 am

Perry Lassiter wrote:Well yeah! Demagogue is three syllables, albeit the middle syllable is a schwa. Maybe English needs a 27th letter, schwa, to replace all those sounds from whatever letters.

That threw me too, at first, but I think he was talking about the "extraneous" A in endeavor.
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