Alphadictionary.com

Our Sponsors

Technical Translation
Website Translation Clip Art
 

Dictionaries

Miscellaneous Other Topics.

Dictionaries

Postby Perry Lassiter » Sat May 18, 2013 3:00 pm

A must-read, if I may be so totalitarian, from today's NYT. And don't forget to scroll down to the comments, which are as good or better than the article. All of the commenters should immediately join the Agora! And there I go, dictatorial again.

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/20 ... ictionary/
pl
Perry Lassiter
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2392
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 12:41 pm
Location: RUSTON, LA

Re: Dictionaries

Postby Philip Hudson » Sat May 18, 2013 11:14 pm

Thomas Hardy used the word "small" as a verb and was challenged by a friend. Hardy showed his friend the entry for "small" in his newest dictionary. The definition was:
small, verb intransitive, to appear smaller as an object does when it moves away from the observer. Authority: Thomas Hardy, "The ship was smalling on the horizon." So there!
It is dark at night, but the Sun will come up and then we can see.
Philip Hudson
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1777
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2006 4:41 am
Location: Texas

Re: Dictionaries

Postby Slava » Sun May 19, 2013 7:10 pm

Here is a nice little piece on the OED from the BBC. Seems to fit in with discussing dictionaries, so I thought I'd toss it out there.
Life is like playing chess with chessmen who each have thoughts and feelings and motives of their own.
User avatar
Slava
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 4685
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:31 am
Location: Finger Lakes, NY

Re: Dictionaries

Postby Perry Lassiter » Mon May 20, 2013 8:40 pm

"Whinging Pom"? How very British, and I have not the slightest clue! My first thought at seeing the heading was those things my granddaughter went around swinging when she was on the freshman dance squad, i.e. pom-poms. My second picture was Muffin, a Pomeranian we enjoyed for ten or twelve years. And I can indeed see it as short for pomegranates. But what in the ever loving blue-eyed world is a whinging pom?

Oh- "everyone has heard of the New Model Army." that means I must haver, but I can't for the life of me remember it.

Gonna need an English to American dictionary to translate English etymologists.
pl
Perry Lassiter
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2392
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 12:41 pm
Location: RUSTON, LA

Re: Dictionaries

Postby Philip Hudson » Tue May 21, 2013 12:25 am

Perry, you can curse the darkness or light a candle. Go to your browser and type in "whinging pom". Enlightenment is just a step away. I guarantee enlightenment, not satisfaction.
It is dark at night, but the Sun will come up and then we can see.
Philip Hudson
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1777
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2006 4:41 am
Location: Texas

Re: Dictionaries

Postby Perry Lassiter » Tue May 21, 2013 3:45 pm

Done, and the pom part was the more fascinating. The winging pom is a Britisher who is always griping. A pom is Aussie slang for a Britisher with mixed ideas for derivations. The one I like starts with being short for pomegranite, since new immigrants easily sunburned and turned red like the fruit. There's another rhyming slang version from immigrants = "Jimmy Grant," which perhaps borrowed on the pomegranate theme.
pl
Perry Lassiter
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2392
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 12:41 pm
Location: RUSTON, LA


Return to Res Diversae

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 2 guests

cron