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aestival, estival

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aestival, estival

Postby William Hupy » Thu Aug 15, 2013 10:57 am

It feels so aestivalish.
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Re: aestival, estival

Postby Perry Lassiter » Thu Aug 15, 2013 11:30 am

Or festivish?
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Re: aestival, estival

Postby Philip Hudson » Thu Aug 15, 2013 12:35 pm

Take your choice. Estival, aestival, preestival, and æstival all mean the same thing - adj. relating to summer. An estival festival seems in order about now since it is 105°F in the shade and the high-pressure dome is centered over Texas as it always is in August. On second thought, why bother?

We could make it a noun for an estival festival, a portmanteau word that is sort of invisible since the two words have identical second syllables. I suppose estivally could be a pronoun and estivate could be a verb with estivation as a completed noun. Or an estivation could mean a summer vacation. Or…
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Re: aestival, estival

Postby gailr » Thu Aug 15, 2013 2:50 pm

...or it could be an estivus for the rest of us? :wink:
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Re: aestival, estival

Postby Slava » Thu Aug 15, 2013 3:00 pm

William Hupy wrote:It feels so aestivalish.

Oddly autumnal in my neck of the woods, though a more estival temperature range is supposedly on its way next week.

It's hard to believe that in all these years we've never seen any of the 4: vernal, estival, autumnal, hibernal.
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Re: aestival, estival

Postby William Hupy » Fri Aug 16, 2013 9:42 am

Slava - I guarantee that it is coming your way. I am in the Upper Peninsula.
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Re: aestival, estival

Postby Philip Hudson » Fri Aug 16, 2013 12:43 pm

Do you live in igloos in the Upper Peninsula? It is one of the few places in the USA I have not visited.
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Re: aestival, estival

Postby gailr » Fri Aug 16, 2013 11:52 pm

No igloos for the Yoopers, unless built for fun. :D
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Re: aestival, estival

Postby William Hupy » Mon Aug 19, 2013 9:45 am

When you do visit remember this: The Mackinac (pronounced Mackinaw*) Bridge joins Michigan's two peninsulas. Yoopers (persons from the UP) refer to Michiganders from below the bridge as trolls (because trolls live below bridges). Also, remember to try the local cuisine: pasties. They originated in Cornwall and are really a large empanada and delicious. Again, be cautious of how you pronounce this treat. The "A" is not a long A. If you say it as if it rhymes with tasty, you will be directed to a place where it is considered a garment.

PS*Should you be foolish enough to mispronounce it as Mackanack you will be mistaken from a person from IlliNOISE, otherwise known as FIBS.
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Re: aestival, estival

Postby Perry Lassiter » Mon Aug 19, 2013 1:09 pm

There's a mystery series set in Upper Michigan with a protagonist named Quilleran, who refers to the lower peninsula as "down below." No mention I recall of Yoopers or trolls.
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Re: aestival, estival

Postby William Hupy » Mon Aug 19, 2013 5:12 pm

With all due respect, Quilleran's location was not identified as the Upper Peninsula, as far as I know. 400 miles north or everywhere is not a sufficient address, even for the UP. There is a difference between Upper Michigan, which is northern Michigan and the Upper Peninsula. If he was in northern Michigan he is just another troll, not a Yooper and would not be aware of same.
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Re: aestival, estival

Postby Perry Lassiter » Mon Aug 19, 2013 6:55 pm

Perhaps we could ask his cats. And btw, that's the only cat mystery series I have liked.
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Re: aestival, estival

Postby Philip Hudson » Tue Aug 20, 2013 2:50 am

They are all good: Pasties, pastries, empanadas, turnovers, ad infinitum. The Red neck word is fried pies.

There is a little ditty that says:

"I hate abhor detest despise
Abominate dried apple pies
Step on my corns and tell me lies
But don't feed me dried apple pies.

The farmer takes his gnarliest fruit
'Tis wormy bitter and hard to boot
Then on a dirty cord 'tis strung
And out a bathroom window hung

And there it serves as a roost for flies
Until it's made up into pies.
Step on my corns and tell me lies
But don't feed me dried apple pies."

I quite like them. Mamma fried them in the morning and packed them in my lunch. In winter we would put them on top of the cast iron heater in the class room to restore them to their piping hot condition. There is an advantage to growing up poor - there is more to appreciate in the world.

I have missed the famous Cornwall pasties even though I have headed toward Cornwall several times, planning to go all the way to St. Ives. I always got waylaid in Bath, Wells, Glastonbury or somewhere in Devon and never made it to Cornwall. From the TV program, “Doc Martin”, Cornwall is not much like the Northern Peninsula.
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Re: aestival, estival

Postby William Hupy » Tue Aug 20, 2013 9:13 am

There is no need to go to Cornwall or the UP to eat pasties. I had one in London in Paddington station. If you take the train from Paddington station to Penzance you can enjoy this culinary delight on the train! Those hearty Cornish miners who brought their skills at teasing iron ore from rock to the UP also brought with them their singular pasty, which was carried into the shaft and consumed for lunch.
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Re: aestival, estival

Postby Perry Lassiter » Tue Aug 20, 2013 3:04 pm

Arby's now has the best fried pies, apple or cherry, imho. The crust is light and flaky, for me a sine qua non. I've known only one woman who can duplicate the light flaky, but she won't share her secret. I suspect it's very hot oil, so they come in and out before they absorb much. Natchitoches, LA is famous for its meat pies, which are good, but the pastry is too heavy for my taste. Pronounced nack-i-tosh, not to be confused with Nachidoches, TX.
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