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para, por

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para, por

Postby William Hupy » Fri Nov 22, 2013 11:10 am

I am mostly unable to distinguish when to use para and por in Spanish. Does anyone have any SIMPLE hints, tips or suggestions?
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Re: para, por

Postby Perry Lassiter » Fri Nov 22, 2013 3:54 pm

I remember when I was taking Spanish, there were some ways to distinguish which to use. Many years later, I find I have developed an instinct that is usually correct, probably from reading so much that I learned by induction. Maybe Philip has an idea.
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Re: para, por

Postby Perry Lassiter » Fri Nov 22, 2013 3:59 pm

On reflection, maybe – maybe, it goes something like this. Por usually takes a noun or pronoun for an object. Este libro es por Juan. Para often results in some kind of action? Este libro es para leyendo a la clase. Maybe?
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Re: para, por

Postby gailr » Fri Nov 22, 2013 9:36 pm

William: there are several sites to help with Spanish grammar, but this one appears to have a straightforward set of guidelines for por and para. Perhaps a native speaker or Spanish teacher can point to a better list?
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Re: para, por

Postby William Hupy » Mon Nov 25, 2013 10:32 am

Thank you Perry and Gailr.
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Re: para, por

Postby Philip Hudson » Tue Nov 26, 2013 11:30 am

The site for por versus para Gail recommended is thorough. That's a lot to remember. We are talking prepositions here so we shouldn't be surprised. German prepositions are also hard. "to the city" translates "in die Stadt" while "to home" translates "nach Hauser". English prepositions may be the hardest. http://translate.google.com/ does a good job on specific instances.
It is dark at night, but the Sun will come up and then we can see.
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Re: para, por

Postby Perry Lassiter » Tue Nov 26, 2013 7:52 pm

In Greek, and I think Latin, the case following the preposition plays a role. The same word followed by an accusative may mean one thing and followed by a genitive another meaning altogether. Then there is the holy trinity of cases: dative, locative, and instrumental - all of which are written identically. In NT commentaries writers can go on and on elaborating one choice against another. Thankfully (it is the season), English doesn't have that plethora of cases, although we keep the dative in the form of an indirect object. Mind-bending.
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