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Apo

A discussion of word histories and origins.

Apo

Postby Brazilian dude » Sat Jul 16, 2005 11:50 am

apologia \ap-uh-LOH-jee-uh\ noun

: a defense especially of one's opinions, position, or actions

Example sentence:
The book is being promoted as an inspiring memoir of a self-made man, but it is mostly an apologia for various unpopular professional choices made by its author over the years.

Did you know?
As you might expect, "apologia" is a close relative of "apology." Both words derive from Late Latin; "apologia" came to English as a direct borrowing while "apology" traveled through Middle French. The Latin "apologia" derives from a combination of the Greek prefix "apo-," meaning "away from," and the word "logia," from Greek "logos," meaning "speech." In their earliest English uses, "apologia" and "apology" meant basically the same thing: a formal defense or justification of one's actions or opinions. Nowadays, however, the two are more distinct. The modern "apology" generally involves an admission of wrongdoing and an expression of regret for past actions, while an "apologia" typically focuses on explaining, justifying, or making clear the grounds for some course of action, belief, or position.


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Postby tcward » Sat Jul 16, 2005 8:46 pm

...while an "apologia" typically focuses on explaining, justifying, or making clear the grounds for some course of action, belief, or position.


Whence comes apologetics...

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Re: Apo

Postby M. Henri Day » Sat Sep 10, 2005 12:25 pm

Brazilian dude wrote:
...

The modern "apology" generally involves an admission of wrongdoing and an expression of regret for past actions, while an "apologia" typically focuses on explaining, justifying, or making clear the grounds for some course of action, belief, or position.


The classical locus is, of course, «Η Απολογία του Σωκράτη», or Sōkràtes' (actually Platon's) «Apology», which was hardly apologetic in tone....

Henri
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Postby anders » Sat Sep 10, 2005 4:16 pm

That's Greek to me. The one I think of is here.
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Postby M. Henri Day » Sat Sep 10, 2005 4:28 pm

Thanks, Anders ! Good to know that I'm only 2300 years behind the times, instead of 2400....

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