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Question of dialect

A forum for discussing US dialects (accents).

Question of dialect

Postby estacio » Sun Dec 18, 2005 4:00 am

I have this strange habbit of pronouncing the word "bag" as "beg" and "wagon" as "wai-gon." Does anyone know where this dialect comes from?
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Postby Apoclima » Sun Dec 18, 2005 1:03 pm

Sounds foreign to me! Maybe Northern Midwest!

Apo
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Re: Question of dialect

Postby Andrew Dalby » Sun Dec 18, 2005 5:45 pm

estacio wrote:I have this strange habbit of pronouncing the word "bag" as "beg" and "wagon" as "wai-gon." Does anyone know where this dialect comes from?


Example A sounds like upper-class England to me: the actress playing Lady Bracknell, in Oscar Wilde's /The Importance of Being Earnest/, will normally exclaim: 'a hend-beg?'
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Shifty vowels

Postby Dr. Goodword » Tue Dec 20, 2005 2:21 am

There are several dialect where [ae] > [e]: Australia/New Zealand and New York-Philadelphia corridor. In New Zealand, the [e] also goes to (bed and bid are pronounced the same).
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Postby Jackie » Thu Dec 22, 2005 3:18 pm

Sounds Southern to me,or a speech impediment...[/url][/list][/list][/b] :lol:
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Postby KatyBr » Thu Dec 22, 2005 4:12 pm

(bed and bid are pronounced the same).
sounds Aussie to me. Except I think bed might be in two syllables then.

Kt
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Postby KatyBr » Thu Dec 22, 2005 4:14 pm

Apoclima wrote:Sounds foreign to me! Maybe Northern Midwest!

Apo
lol so then before you come to visit get your visa, and a green card.

Kt
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Postby tcward » Thu Dec 22, 2005 5:59 pm

The former CEO of my former company (we were acquired by another company before he left) had a tendency to pronounce things just as estacio has inquired. I never asked him where he was from ("Ain't from around here, are ya feller?"), but for some reason I always suspected he was either from the Northeastern US and had overcome those particular dialectical tendencies, but still had some markers here and there, or was from California. I believe I've heard Californians who tend to speak this way too.

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Postby Brazilian dude » Thu Dec 22, 2005 10:13 pm

The former CEO of my former company (we were acquired by another company before he left) had a tendency to pronounce things just as estacio has inquired.

Oh, no. Henrinitis is communicable.

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Postby felonymelanie » Sun Jan 08, 2006 2:47 pm

I talk like that too. I'm from the Great Lakes area (western New York)
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Postby Stargzer » Sun Jan 08, 2006 4:44 pm

felonymelanie wrote:I talk like that too. I'm from the Great Lakes area (western New York)


Welcome, 'Melanie!

One of my brothers moved from the DC area to Skaneateles after high school to chase a girlfriend who later dumped him. He moved around NY a bit, finally settling down south in Oneonta.

Stick around! You'll like it here!
Regards//Larry

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Postby tcward » Sun Jan 08, 2006 8:25 pm

Funny, the company that bought us is based out of Skaneateles Falls, NY. "Skaneateles" isn't pronounced anything like it's spelt, by the way. OK, something like it's spelt, but not much.

And yes, BD, Henri-itis is communicable. It communicates formal nouns and nouns of address very well. ;)

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Can I have a beg, please?

Postby MNgyal » Mon Feb 06, 2006 10:19 am

Don't know where you picked it up, but it sounds like the Midwest to me. Minnesotans say bag that way all the time...
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One more thing: )

Postby MNgyal » Mon Feb 06, 2006 10:23 am

Forgot to say: the way you say wagon also strikes me as benig from the Midwest. Do you have Scandinavian ancestry? That's why Minnesotans elongate their vowels that way.
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Postby KatyBr » Mon Feb 06, 2006 11:05 am

I was born in the midwest and pronounce wagon properly, so did everyone I knew there. I never noticed much of an accent while there, I blended right in, keep in mind I was born there but spent a lot of time in the south then moved to Minneapolis for high school/college.

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maybe because we were always surrounded by so many people with such diverse accents.
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