Alphadictionary.com

Our Sponsors

Technical Translation
Website Translation Clip Art
 

Singular noun/pronoun and verb

You have words - now what do you do with them?

Postby mamawsandy » Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:25 pm

As a writer once said, "Let it all hang out."
In writing for anything except professional documents, office work, ect. letting the grammar slide into the vernacular is premitted, even perferred. I am terrible about spelling, being right-brained, but I always use the spell checker or dictionary to check any words I am not sure of. Bad spelling is often worse than bad grammar.

I guess I have had to be hypercorrective for too many years. I am now retired and also am writing things, and I have discovered again the beauty of grammar that is used by writers for effect. I have always known that using the slang, tone, colloquisms of the region, or culture is the way to write anything for any other type of work.

I am not going to stay where the skins of the members are so thin that they feel they must attack those who have a different view. This is infantile of those who do this. There is room for more opinions than are on this board.

We can always refer back to older times to provide reasons for our grammar or pronunciation. I have studied the history of the language at extent. But who would want to talk to someone who used the Chaucer style to speak? How many people would take the time to read through a paragraph with the Chaucer language? I feel we can use these examples of the past, but not to forget that we live in a different day. And, in our society, we must learn to communicate well. It is especially important for those who want to apply for a job or to make himself fit for a job promotion.

Gross grammar mistakes from people who should know better just catch my ear. I find these most bothersome in people I look up to as an expert in their chosen field.
So, my reply to you who criticize is this: You must first KNOW the correct grammar before you are free to take license with it.
However, I am a steel magnolia and will not give up so easily. I may even point out the mistakes in thinking of some of you. Never be so sure of what you know that you are not open for other thinking.
mamawsandy
I'm a Steel Magnolia
Tough but gentle
Like a lady
mamawsandy
Junior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Dec 23, 2005 11:43 am
Location: SETENNESSEE

Postby gailr » Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:51 pm

I don't think that steel magnolias wilt easily, mamawsandy, so just keep posting. (Of course, they may rust a little...?) :D

With a warm smile may I formally welcome you to our ranks by noting this; you fit in very well here!
mamawsandy wrote:It is especially important for those who want to apply for a job or to make himself fit for a job promotion.
[my emphasis]

US President Andrew Jackson observed: "It's a damn poor mind that can think of only one way to spell a word." He would probably feel the same about correct grammar. :D

-gailr
who rather enjoys reading Chaucerian English
User avatar
gailr
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1945
Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2005 11:40 am

Postby mamawsandy » Wed Jan 11, 2006 3:55 pm

Touche my friend. I do not use the correct grammar unless I am writing for a reason. I murder the spoken language also. Even my penmanship has gone to pot. That's what happens when we get slack on our attention to grammar. But it didn't make my words diffficult for you to read. I think this is the important things. Some people sound so darn smart that one is tempted to focus on them instead of what is being said, written.

I am of the Scotch/Irish and German heritage. I have studied the language of those who settled this area and were of the Scotch/Irish people. Even the words that we often mistake as wrong had their origions in this language. For instance, the word "youins" that is so often heard in our area is of that heritage. It was not wrong for them, and is still practiced here (much to my hurting ear.).
mamawsandy
I'm a Steel Magnolia
Tough but gentle
Like a lady
mamawsandy
Junior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Dec 23, 2005 11:43 am
Location: SETENNESSEE

Postby Stargzer » Thu Jan 12, 2006 1:26 am

mamawsandy wrote: . . . Even the words that we often mistake as wrong had their origions in this language. For instance, the word "youins" that is so often heard in our area is of that heritage. It was not wrong for them, and is still practiced here (much to my hurting ear.).


Head North a ways from the Land of the TVA, cross over the Bluegrass State, and then head East after you hit the Buckeye State towards Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania to hear the "yuns" or "yoons" of the native Pittsbugher ("y'uns"<--"you-uns"<--"you ones" is my suspected etymology). Yeah, the Irish settled there, too. At least, my wife's family did.

OOH! Lookie here what I found while looking up Buckeye:

North Carolina
In 1629, King Charles I of England "erected into a province," all the land from Albemarle Sound on the north to the St. John's River on the south, which he directed should be called Carolina. The word Carolina is from the word Carolus, the Latin form of Charles.

When Carolina was divided in 1710, the southern part was called South Carolina and the northern, or older settlement, North Carolina. From this came the nickname the “Old North State.” Historians have recorded that the principle products during the early history of North Carolina were "tar, pitch, and turpentine." It was during one of the fiercest battles of the War Between the States, so the story goes, that the column supporting the North Carolina troops was driven from the field. After the battle the North Carolinians, who had successfully fought it out alone, were greeted from the passing derelict regiment with the question: "Any more tar down in the Old North State, boys?" Quick as a flash came the answer: "No, not a bit, old Jeff's bought it all up." "Is that so; what is he going to do with it?" was asked. "He's going to put on you-un's heels to make you stick better in the next fight." Creecy relates that General Lee, upon hearing of the incident, said: "God bless the “Tar Heel” boys," and from that they took the name.

(Adapted from Grandfather Tales of North Carolina by R.B. Creecy and Histories of North Carolina Regiments, Vol. III, by Walter Clark).
source: http://statelibrary.dcr.state.nc.us/nc/ ... ymbols.htm


Ya never know what you'll find when you go prowling around the 'Net!
Regards//Larry

"To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them."
-- Attributed to Richard Henry Lee
User avatar
Stargzer
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2546
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:56 pm
Location: Crownsville, MD

Previous

Return to Grammar

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

cron