Koine form of Immanuel

A discussion of the peculiarities of languages and the differences between them.
Huia Iesou
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Koine form of Immanuel

Postby Huia Iesou » Fri Mar 10, 2006 6:47 pm

Does anyone know if the Hebrew word Immanuel was taken into Koine Greek? If so, would it be a third declension, as in Immanuel, Immanuelos?

Any help would be appreciated. :)

Flaminius
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Postby Flaminius » Sat Mar 11, 2006 12:19 am

Immanuel is Eμμανουηλ in Koine Greek. I think this is an invariable noun since I could not find any accusative form different from the nominative: *Eμμανουηλαν, *Eμμανουηλην, *Eμμανουηλον.

שלום וברכה
Huia Jesou!

Huia Iesou
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Postby Huia Iesou » Sat Mar 11, 2006 11:10 am

Thanks! Would you mind telling me if the asterisked forms are possible forms or just roots?

PS: I would love to know what the word after shalom means and what vowels go with it. I'm still struggling with my Hebrew dictionary because it uses roots and I haven't learned any grammar yet, just been working on reading.

Flaminius
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Postby Flaminius » Sat Mar 11, 2006 11:57 am

*Eμμανουηλαν, *Eμμανουηλην, *Eμμανουηλον.

There are non-existent would-be accusatives, if the word was to have normal Greek declension.

Shalom u-vrakha

Peace and blessing -- a typical Hebrew greeting.

Huia Iesou
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Postby Huia Iesou » Sat Mar 11, 2006 5:18 pm

Thank you again! :D

Andrew Dalby
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Postby Andrew Dalby » Sun Mar 12, 2006 10:01 am

I suppose this is the origin of Manuel (Greek Manouel), name of the twelfth-century emperor Manuel Komnenos. This form, too, seems to be invariable: no differing accusative, genitive or dative cases.

Flaminius
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Postby Flaminius » Mon Mar 13, 2006 11:15 am

I further checked and realised that consonant endings for Greek nouns are limited to S, R and N. Borrrowed words ending with other consonants cannot be inflected according to the declension paradigm.

Huia Iesou
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Postby Huia Iesou » Mon Mar 13, 2006 4:43 pm

That makes sense, and it was something I hadn't noticed before.

portokalos
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Postby portokalos » Fri Mar 31, 2006 5:47 am

More comon in new Greeks Mανώλης.


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