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emphasis

A discussion of word histories and origins.

emphasis

Postby Brazilian dude » Sat Mar 18, 2006 2:13 pm

What is the Daily Buzzword for March 18?
emphasis \EM-fuh-sis\ noun

What does it mean?
1 a : forcefulness of expression b : the act or fact of giving stress to a
word or syllable when speaking
2 : special note made of or importance given to something

How do you use it?
The camp counselors put special emphasis on safety in all the
camp's activities.

Are you a word wiz?
"Emphasis" traces to the Latin root "phainein," meaning "to
show." What other word do you think comes from the same root?

A. phase
B. form
C. phobia
D. fashion

Answer:
Like "emphasis," the word "phase" traces back to the Latin root "phainein."
Two other members of the "phainein" family are "fancy" and "diaphanous." None of these words have much else in
common with "emphasis," but they do all have something to do with showing. In reference to the moon, "phase" means the changing amount that shows as it orbits around the earth. One of the earliest uses of the noun "fancy" was for something that shows or that someone sees but that is not really there. And if you call something "diaphanous," that means you can see through it or it shows through.


Latin :?: I don't think so. :roll:

Brazilian dude
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Postby bnjtokyo » Mon Mar 20, 2006 5:40 am

The AHD says "New Latin 'phasis' from Greek . . . see bha1"

In the PIE roots in the appendix, it lists the following derivatives: Fantasy, Pant, -phane, Phantasm, (Phantom), Phase, Pheno, Phenomenon, Diaphanous, Empahsis, Epiphany, Hierophant, Phanergam, (Phantasmagoria), Phosphene, Sycophant, Theophany, (Tiffany)

I looked these words up again and
-phane, pheno, epiphany and phosphene don't mention Latin in their entomology. The others all include a Latin way station.

Cheers,
bnjtokyo
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Postby Brazilian dude » Mon Mar 20, 2006 8:06 am

I'm talking about phainein, which is obviously not Latin. Latin verbs must end in -are, -ere or -ire.

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