Alphadictionary.com

Our Sponsors

Technical Translation
Website Translation Clip Art
 

Soft Drinks: pop, soda, coke, et al

A forum for discussing US dialects (accents).

Postby deespoohbear » Sat Apr 29, 2006 11:43 am

Growing up in extreme southwest Indiana, we always said "Coke", no matter if it was Coca Cola or Pepsi. After I was married, I moved to Northeastern Indiana, and up here it is "Pop."

Hubby has tried hard to get me to say "Pop"...he was born and raised here in NE Indiana. But my southern Indiana roots take hold of me once in awhile, and "coke" will be what I ask for at a restaurant, no matter what brand they serve.
deespoohbear
Junior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Apr 29, 2006 11:31 am

Postby cremepuff » Tue May 02, 2006 5:16 pm

It's pretty much known as "pop" in Chicagoland, though I've heard "soda" in a few places up north. Then there's the occasional "carbonated beverage," which is just WEIRD.
cremepuff
Junior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue May 02, 2006 3:45 am

Postby AdoAnnie » Tue May 02, 2006 11:48 pm

"carbonated beverage,"


Reminds me of the rather repressive Junior College that I attended many a long year ago. We of the Psi Phi Club (yes, we were all SF freaks) had posted a notice on the community board that we were having an off campus meeting at a members home. At the bottom of the notice was the caveat, 'food provided, BYOB'. The next day we were asked to remove the notice as it implied that the college was condoning the use of alcohol. We removed the notice rather than spat with the Dean over freedom of speech and freedom of drink at an off campus meeting and replaced it with a notice that read, "Food provided, Bring Your Own Beverage". That notice disappeared the next day.

Maybe if we had added "carbonated" the notice might have been allowed to stay. As it was we still had a good turn out and a laugh at the pettiness of the administration.
The neighbors said that they knew the man who'd been shot for years.
AdoAnnie
Junior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 45
Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 8:04 am

Postby southern_belle » Thu May 04, 2006 11:22 am

I tested 100% Rebel. I use the word drink. I am from North Carolina-Surry County area.
100% Rebel. Is General Lee your grandfather?!
southern_belle
Junior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu May 04, 2006 11:19 am

Postby Stargzer » Thu May 04, 2006 10:04 pm

AdoAnnie wrote:
"carbonated beverage,"


. . . Maybe if we had added "carbonated" the notice might have been allowed to stay.



That probably would have depended on whether or not the Dean drank flat beer . . . :lol:

As it was we still had a good turn out and a laugh at the pettiness of the administration.


My high school Physics teacher claimed that is Italian grandmother used to say, "You can't fight City Hall, but you can always [euphemism]defecate[/euphemism] on the steps."

8)
Regards//Larry

"To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them."
-- Attributed to Richard Henry Lee
User avatar
Stargzer
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2546
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:56 pm
Location: Crownsville, MD

Postby AdoAnnie » Thu May 04, 2006 11:49 pm

My high school Physics teacher claimed that is Italian grandmother used to say, "You can't fight City Hall, but you can always [euphemism]defecate[/euphemism] on the steps."


My kind of grandmother! You gotta learn early how to politic.

Oh, no, did I just use a noun as a verb? I think I did. How 'new speak' of me. Our company has come up with a new one that just wrings my panties into a twisted knot. Because of low ratings in recent surveys on the question of employee satisfaction the People Centric Employee Evaluation Committee has been created. Can anyone 'splain that one to me? Are they going to evaluate Centric People? None of us has YET figured out how this committee relates to employee satisfaction, but I'm sure we will find out. :roll:
The neighbors said that they knew the man who'd been shot for years.
AdoAnnie
Junior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 45
Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 8:04 am

Postby Perry » Fri May 05, 2006 9:16 am

Might there be robot employees that are being evaluated by a Robot Centric Employee Evaluation Committee?
"Time is nature's way of keeping everything from happening all at once. Lately it hasn't been working."
Anonymous
User avatar
Perry
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2306
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 9:50 am
Location: Asheville, NC

carbonated beverages

Postby Dizzy » Tue May 09, 2006 12:18 am

I grew up in southern Wis. There were bubblers on many corners with running water. A soft drink was called "pop". We wore gym shoes. Now I live in Ga. Getting away from it a little but a soft drink was always referred to as cokecola. (with a very silent k) more like cocola. And here its sneakers, but I think its a more modern term. They don't open a window here they "crack the window". I'm "fixin to" is a good one because southerners are always "gonna" do this or that. And "over yonder" is where they go. Southern women all love their "daa dees". Even southern men refer to their fathers as "daddy" In Wi. it was just "dad". Black people speak a language called "ebonics". They would do us all a favor and learn to speak English. Been here over 30 years and still don't understand them. Diz
Dizzy
Junior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon May 08, 2006 11:43 pm

Pop or Coke

Postby Mama » Tue May 09, 2006 5:39 pm

I grew up in Tennessee, where all soft drinks were called Cokes, and the first time I heard the word "pop" was in Michigan, when someone asked me, "Do you want a pop?" and I said, "Do I wanna WHAT??" I thought it was something they wanted me to DO! LOL. Now I live in Pennsylvania, and I call all soft drinks pop. Go figure.
Mama
Mama
Junior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 38
Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 5:34 pm

Postby AdoAnnie » Tue May 09, 2006 8:21 pm

Southern women all love their "daa dees". Even southern men refer to their fathers as "daddy"


We Southern Women happen to love our daddies very much and our mammas, too. :wink: So no dissin' our venacular. We speak English just like everybody else. :)
The neighbors said that they knew the man who'd been shot for years.
AdoAnnie
Junior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 45
Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 8:04 am

Previous

Return to The Rebel-Yankee Test

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron