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Po-boys

A forum for discussing US dialects (accents).

Po-boys

Postby mattpreston007 » Fri Dec 23, 2005 8:15 pm

Loved the test, just wanted to make a quick point.

I'm from SE Louisiana (Slidell). What we call po-boys are different from subs. Po-boys are on french bread and generally served hot. If the sandwich in question is on soft bread, I just call it a sub.
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Postby Guest » Sat Dec 24, 2005 12:55 am

I'm from Texas, and it's the same here. I consider a po'boy to be a different thing from a sub.
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po-boy's

Postby barefootbayougirl » Thu Dec 29, 2005 9:13 pm

I live in S.E. Louisiana also. (Gonzales). And my visions of the perfect po-boy is hot roast beef, dressed, with lot's of gravy. When those juices from it, just start sliding down to your elbow, and you need a roll of paper towel's to try to keep up with it. hee-hee. You can't get that at sub-way.

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Postby Stargzer » Fri Dec 30, 2005 12:17 am

Welcome, Carolyn! It's a good thing I already had dinner or I'd have to run out to the local roadhouse looking for a hot roast beef sandwich. Although, a broiled crabcake sandwich would be good, too. 8)
Regards//Larry

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Gulf Coast Po-Boy.

Postby caradube » Wed Jan 04, 2006 9:18 pm

I am from the coast of ALabama and we, along with my family from NO consider a po-boy crusty french bread like said before, usually with fried seafood on it. Cold cuts, etc. is just a sub.
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Po Boy

Postby Susann » Thu Feb 23, 2006 7:47 pm

I'm from Washington State (NEVER call it "worshington"!) and think that Po-Boys and subs are two very different things...a Po-Boy is a toasted French roll with deep fried sea food (usually oysters); a sub is various cold cuts. We don't have Po-Boys where I live, I've only seen those in New Orleans.
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Po-boys

Postby Jo300e » Fri Mar 03, 2006 11:47 am

Here in NYC, we call em "Heroes". It was not one of the choices on the Yank-Reb test....
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Re: po-boy's

Postby Queen Cat » Mon Mar 06, 2006 9:24 pm

barefootbayougirl wrote:I live in S.E. Louisiana also. (Gonzales). And my visions of the perfect po-boy is hot roast beef, dressed, with lot's of gravy. When those juices from it, just start sliding down to your elbow, and you need a roll of paper towel's to try to keep up with it. hee-hee. You can't get that at sub-way.

Carolyn



Just don't forget the fries to dip in the extra gravy..LOL
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Subs/Grinders

Postby chlyn » Thu Mar 16, 2006 10:49 pm

The test said that "grinders" is used in Connecticut and north to Vermont. That must include Worcester, Massachusetts.

I grew up in eastern Massachusetts eating subs.

When I moved just 45 minutes away to Worcester for college, I was surprised to find that the natives called them "grinders". Strange how words can be so different just a short car ride away.
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Po boys

Postby AHalfmann » Mon Mar 20, 2006 7:55 pm

The po' boy got it's name from being a South Louisiana's poor man's dinner, made of crusty french bread and left overs - from fried potatoes to roast beef with drippings to fried oysters... and crawfish and shrimp. I understand that it is the oyster version that has such romantic ties --- it is said that wayward husbands would take their wives a beloved oyster po'boy when it came time to get back into their good graces. :wink:
Haven't heard anything like that about a sub . . .
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Postby Stargzer » Tue Mar 21, 2006 3:40 pm

Wikipedia's take on the origin of Po' Boy.
Regards//Larry

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Postby Parish_Boy » Mon Mar 27, 2006 5:08 pm

Somtimes I forget where I am... I'm from "downaroad" in St. Bernard next to New Orleans, but I'm just got to New York City where I'll be for the immediate future. I went to the deli down the street, I was tired and hungry and said "Yeah lemme get a roast beef poboy, dressed". He looked at me like I had a third eye. :-) Oh I miss N.O. ....
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grinders and heroes

Postby sluggo » Wed Apr 12, 2006 2:54 pm

When I lived in Vermont I came to understand that a Grinder was a sub that had been heated- the roll toasted in the oven (with cheese to melt if desired) and dressed afterward- in short the same thing Quiznos now sells nationally for twice the price. If made cold, it was still a sub or hero, not a Grinder, at least in that area.

Good point made on the absence of Hero (from Gyro) on the YankReb test. Must not have been any Greeks on the test committee...
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Hoagies

Postby Mama » Thu May 11, 2006 8:33 am

Well, here in Pittsburgh, we call them hoagies, even when we go to Subway to order one. They should call it Hoagieway. It just doesn't have that ring to it, does it? Not to get off TRACK (pun intended). Hee Hee.
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