Alphadictionary.com

Our Sponsors

Technical Translation
Website Translation Clip Art
 

Bupkis

Use this forum to suggest Good Words for Professor Beard.

Bupkis

Postby sluggo » Fri Jan 05, 2007 3:56 am

Bupkis (BUP-kiss)

Nothing, nada, zilch, a USian version of the British buggerall - often but not always used as one of a pair of double negatives: "He knew bupkis about farming"/ "He didn't know bupkis about farming".

Imported from Yiddish ("beans")?

Was reencouternated with this wonderfully whimsical word in a totally unrelated tangent surf-- on, of all things, an automotive message board. Made me wonder how many years it had been since I've heard it used. Time to bring it back?
Stop! Murder us not, tonsured rumpots! Knife no one, fink!
sluggo
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1476
Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 1:58 pm
Location: Carolinia Agrestícia: The Forest Primeval

Postby Perry » Fri Jan 05, 2007 10:49 am

Yes, this is from the Yiddish for beans.

A wonderful opposite expression for someone that does know what he/she is talking about or doing, "really knows his onions". I have know idea what the origin is.
"Time is nature's way of keeping everything from happening all at once. Lately it hasn't been working."
Anonymous
User avatar
Perry
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2306
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 9:50 am
Location: Asheville, NC

Postby Palewriter » Fri Jan 05, 2007 3:38 pm

Perry wrote:Yes, this is from the Yiddish for beans.

A wonderful opposite expression for someone that does know what he/she is talking about or doing, "really knows his onions". I have know idea what the origin is.


Here's the skinny on "know your onions", from the excellent World Wide Words site.

Incidentally, "bugger all" has a couple of sibling expressions in Brit. "Sod all" used to be heard much more than it is today. The ubiquitous F-word+all is probably more heard today than when I was a nipper.

-- PW
"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention to arrive safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming: Wow!!! What a ride!"
Palewriter
Lexiterian
 
Posts: 291
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 11:59 pm

Postby sluggo » Fri Jan 05, 2007 4:27 pm

I have heard F-word-all from a couple of USians, though usage of bugger- and sod- seem to stay reserved for the UK.

Diddley, Squat and Jack (or jack-****) are more synonyms in North America. How many others might we think of?
Stop! Murder us not, tonsured rumpots! Knife no one, fink!
sluggo
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1476
Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 1:58 pm
Location: Carolinia Agrestícia: The Forest Primeval

Postby Palewriter » Fri Jan 05, 2007 4:55 pm

sluggo wrote:I have heard F-word-all from a couple of USians, though usage of bugger- and sod- seem to stay reserved for the UK.

Diddley, Squat and Jack (or jack-****) are more synonyms in North America. How many others might we think of?


Sweet Fanny Adams is an expression that used to be in vogue. Strictly ostpondial, as far as I know. Acronym-based, of course.

-- PW
"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention to arrive safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming: Wow!!! What a ride!"
Palewriter
Lexiterian
 
Posts: 291
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 11:59 pm

Postby sluggo » Fri Jan 05, 2007 5:55 pm

Palewriter wrote:
Sweet Fanny Adams is an expression that used to be in vogue. Strictly ostpondial, as far as I know. Acronym-based, of course.

-- PW


Nice info PW. And I just love "ostpondial"!
Last edited by sluggo on Sat Jan 06, 2007 3:33 am, edited 1 time in total.
Stop! Murder us not, tonsured rumpots! Knife no one, fink!
sluggo
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1476
Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 1:58 pm
Location: Carolinia Agrestícia: The Forest Primeval

Postby Bailey » Fri Jan 05, 2007 7:36 pm

The F-word here is, hopefully yet, not said in polite or even normal society.

mark-reserves-the-really-bad-words-for-self-mashed-thumbs* Bailey

*and usually in private
Last edited by Bailey on Fri Jan 05, 2007 10:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Today is the first day of the rest of your life, Make the most of it...
kb








Bailey
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2114
Joined: Tue Mar 21, 2006 7:51 pm

Postby gailr » Fri Jan 05, 2007 9:39 pm

Where is Brazilian_dude to tell us that he doesn't know squat about this? :(


Bupkis is not be confused with its homonym pupkus
(sniglet n. The moist residue left on a window after a dog presses its nose to it.)

-gailr
User avatar
gailr
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1945
Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2005 11:40 am

Postby sluggo » Sat Jan 06, 2007 3:32 am

Bailey wrote:The F-word here is, hopefully yet, not said in polite or even normal society.
...


No, but that sort of society wouldn't apply to the circles I go around in... although one of those USian uses I heard was on TV (Dennis Miller).
Stop! Murder us not, tonsured rumpots! Knife no one, fink!
sluggo
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1476
Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 1:58 pm
Location: Carolinia Agrestícia: The Forest Primeval

Postby Bailey » Sat Jan 06, 2007 12:30 pm

Oh I hear it on BBC-A ALL the time, and worse. and cable, they act like folks have used it for centuries.

mark dag-nabbit Bailey

Today is the first day of the rest of your life, Make the most of it...
kb








Bailey
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2114
Joined: Tue Mar 21, 2006 7:51 pm

Postby tcward » Mon Jan 08, 2007 6:13 pm

I think a lot of people mispronounce this word, or think it is pronounced bumpkiss (with an 'm').

And here's even more from World Wide Words on beans.

-Tim
User avatar
tcward
Senior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 789
Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2005 5:18 pm
Location: The Old North State

Postby Palewriter » Fri Jan 12, 2007 12:44 am

sluggo wrote:No, but that sort of society wouldn't apply to the circles I go around in...


Sorry to hear you're going around in circles, Sluggo. I know the feeling very well.


-- PW
"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention to arrive safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming: Wow!!! What a ride!"
Palewriter
Lexiterian
 
Posts: 291
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 11:59 pm

Postby Stargzer » Fri Jan 12, 2007 10:29 am

Palewriter wrote:
sluggo wrote:No, but that sort of society wouldn't apply to the circles I go around in...


Sorry to hear you're going around in circles, Sluggo. I know the feeling very well.


-- PW


"Blessed are they who run in circles, for they shall be known as Big Wheels."
Regards//Larry

"To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them."
-- Attributed to Richard Henry Lee
User avatar
Stargzer
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2545
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:56 pm
Location: Crownsville, MD


Return to Good Word Suggestions

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 7 guests

cron