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Salmagundi

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Salmagundi

Postby sluggo » Fri Dec 21, 2007 1:27 am

salmagundi

Pronunciation: sæl-mê-gên-di • Hear it!

Part of Speech: Noun, mass

Meaning: 1. A dish of chopped meats, anchovies, fruits, vegetables, usually highly spiced, served as a salad, garnish, or spread. 2. A hodge-podge, mishmash, jumbled mixture.

Notes: A 17th century recipe: "Cut cold roast chicken or other meats into slices. Mix with minced tarragon and an onion. Mix all together with capers, olives, samphire, broombuds, mushrooms, oysters, lemon, orange, raisins, almonds, blue figs, Virginia potatoes, peas, and red and white currants. Garnish with sliced oranges and lemons. Cover with oil and vinegar, beaten together." —The Good Huswives Treasure, Robert May (1588-1660)

In Play: The salmagundi I know is a pungently tasty spread that also serves as a spicy garnish for red meat, particularly if barbecued or otherwise highly seasoned. But the word's metaphorical versatility is what lexical legends are made of: "The Mardi Gras parade was a salmagundi of outrageous colors, musics, and motions." We find salmagundis all around us: "New York is a salmagundi of all the cultures of the world."

Word History: Today's Good Word was borrowed from Middle French salmingondis, a compound probably based on salemine "salted food" and condir, "to season". Salemine comes from Latin salamen "salted food", which became salami in Italian. The regular noun from condire (from Latin condire "to season") is condiment. (Dr. Goodword thanks Richard and Yvonne Smith of Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, originally from Guyana, for introducing him to salmagundi—the word and the gastronomic delight.)
Last edited by sluggo on Fri Dec 21, 2007 1:37 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby sluggo » Fri Dec 21, 2007 1:30 am

unfortunately the sound kitchen seems to be fresh out of salgamundi. I left the link intact in case the sound-chef comes up with a fresh batch.

Edit: QuickThyme is served!

Sounds interesting. I'd try it but it sounds a bit too close to chutney for my taste :o
Last edited by sluggo on Fri Dec 21, 2007 8:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Perry » Fri Dec 21, 2007 10:42 am

The Good Huswives Treasure, Robert May (1588-1660)


I take it that back then being a Hussy was a good thing. :?
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Postby sluggo » Fri Dec 21, 2007 8:44 pm

Perry wrote:
The Good Huswives Treasure, Robert May (1588-1660)


I take it that back then being a Hussy was a good thing. :?


Whattaya mean 'was'? :twisted:

From Dictionary.com:
Hussy: Origin: 1520–30; earlier hussive, housewife

Housewife
: Origin: 1175–1225; ME hus(e)wif.

- back where we came in and Bob's your uncle.
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Postby gailr » Fri Dec 21, 2007 9:34 pm

sluggo wrote:From Dictionary.com:
Hussy: Origin: 1520–30; earlier hussive, housewife

Housewife
: Origin: 1175–1225; ME hus(e)wif.

So it comes down to: huswife (hussy) or hlæfdige (one who...needs...bread)?
SHEesh.

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Postby gailr » Sat Dec 22, 2007 9:52 pm

Yarr! Look wot oi found:
SALMAGUNDI: A highly-seasoned pirate dish made from available meats or fish.
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Postby Stargzer » Tue Dec 25, 2007 4:37 pm

gailr wrote:Yarr! Look wot oi found:
SALMAGUNDI: A highly-seasoned pirate dish made from available meats or fish.


Not so fast, me bucko! That same page has shilling defined as "A New England coin." I'm sure they were made in Jolly Olde long before the Uppa Youess was established.
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Postby gailr » Tue Dec 25, 2007 9:09 pm

Arrr! Oi din't wroite it, oi jist foun' it.

[edit] 'Tis a piratical soit. Shillins may 'av originated in Jolly Auld but al' yer shillings are belong ter us nigh. Arrr. [/edit]
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