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Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

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314 Results in B (You are getting Full results. Get Clean Results for "B")

  • babbage
    ( adj ) Fake. That Rolex is just babbage.
    1990s
  • baby
    ( n ) Affectionate term of address for either sex. Come on, baby, let's go home.
    1940s
  • baby
    ( n ) Sweetheart. She's my baby and I'd do anything for her.
    1920s
  • baby-doll
    ( int ) Female appellation. Come on, baby doll, let's go home.
    1940s
  • bad
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Wow, that was really a bad movie; I loved it.
    1970s
  • bad business
    ( np ) Trouble. You didn't get any financial aid? That's bad business.
    1940s
  • bad news
    ( np ) Trouble. Stay away from this guy; he's bad news.
    1940s
  • badass
    ( n ) A tough guy. Fred thinks that he is a badass but underneath he is just a sweetie.
    1950s
  • badical
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Dude, that move was badical.
    1990s
  • bag
    ( n ) Favorite thing. What's your bag, man? Let's see if we have anything in common.
    1960s
  • bag
    ( n ) Problem. What's your bag, man? Get off my back.
    1990s
  • bag
    ( v ) To miss, to not attend. Let's bag biology today and go to the library instead.
    1970s
  • bag
    ( v ) To steal, take. Who bagged my bike?
    1980s
  • bail
    ( v ) To leave. This party's a drag; let's bail.
    1990s
  • bail (on)
    ( v ) To abandon, to give up on. I'm not going to bail on you when you are in trouble.
    1970s
  • ball
    ( n ) Great fun. Her class is a ball.
    1950s
  • ball
    ( v ) To flaunt money or wealth. Check out his Mercedes; he's just balling.
    1990s
  • ball-and-chain
    ( n ) Marriage. I'm too young to put on the ball-and-chain.
    1980s
  • balled up
    ( adj ) Confused. Rodney's all balled up; he doesn't know if he is coming or going.
    1920s
  • ballistic
    ( adj ) Out of control. Frieda went ballistic when she heard she was rejected from Harvard.
    1980s
  • baloney
    ( n ) Nonsense! That's a lot of baloney and you know it! None of it is true.
    1920s
  • bananas
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. The guy went bananas when I asked him to leave.
    1930s
  • bang
    ( n ) A party. They had a big bang at his place last night.
    1980s
  • bang
    ( n ) Fun, pleasure. I get a bang out of bungee jumping.
    1930s
  • bang-up
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. We had a bang-up time at the party last night.
    1810s
  • banging
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Man, that's a bangin' new car your mom gave you!
    1990s
  • bank
    ( n ) Money. He has all the bank he needs.
    1990s
  • barf
    ( v, n ) To vomit. He barfed all over the seat of the airplane.
    1950s
  • bark up the wrong tree
    ( vp ) Make a mistake, error. If you think I'm going to help you, you're barking up the wrong tree.
    1830s
  • barnburner
    ( n ) A person or organization that overreacts, throws the baby out with the bathwater. That Congress was a barnburner that tried to reduce oppressive regulations by removing them all.
    1840s
  • barnburner
    ( n ) A highly successful event. The poetry reading turned out to be a real barnburner!
    1970s
  • barnstorm
    ( v ) To make a tour of rural areas. President Clinton was barnstorming for his wife's presidential campaign.
    1840s
  • bash
    ( n ) A drunken spree. He went out on a bash last night and is pretty sick today.
    1900s
  • bash
    ( n ) A party. Melanie had a great bash at her house last night.
    1950s
  • bash
    ( n ) A try, an attempt. Move back and let me have a bash at it.
    1930s
  • baste
    ( v ) To insult. Maureen really basted me for no reason at all.
    1990s
  • baste
    ( v ) To thrash soundly. If you call me a wuss again, I'll give you a basting you'll never forget!
    1530s
  • bats
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. You're completely bats if you think I'll lend you $5.
    1930s
  • batty
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. If you think I'm going to get me to date your sister, you're batty.
    1900s
  • be history
    ( vp ) Defunct, gone, finished. If you are late for work one more time, you are history.
    1970s
  • be-bop
    ( n ) A dance to fast big band jazz. Harry James was playing and everyone be-bopped till midnight.
    1940s
  • bear
    ( n ) A patrolman or security guard. Something is going on in Ferket Hall; I just saw two bears go in.
    1970s
  • bearcat
    ( n ) A sexy or seductive woman. Man, that Cindy Lou is a lot of fun! What a bearcat that woman is!
    1920s
  • beat
    ( adj ) Bad or in bad condition. That party was kind of beat, don't you think.
    1990s
  • beat
    ( adj ) Tired, exhausted. After working all day I am really beat.
    1940s
  • beat
    ( adj ) Turned off, exiled, underground. The Beat Generation and its beatniks withdrew from society because they were beat.
    1950s
  • beat
    ( n ) Policeman's patrol area. My old man walked a beat for 20 years.
    1720s
  • beat
    ( v ) Stump, be incomprehensible. It beats me how Snerdley pays for the gas for that car of his.
    1910s
  • beat all
    ( vp ) Be outrageous. Doesn't that beat all?
    1930s
  • beat feet
    ( vp ) To leave. Let's beat feet out of here.
    2000s
  • beat it
    ( v ) To leave. When the cops drove up, we had to beat it.
    1910s
  • beat one's gums
    ( vp ) To talk. We were just sitting around, beating our gums about nothing.
    1920s
  • beatnik
    ( n ) Member of the counterculture. He is a beatnik who hangs around the underground coffee shops downtown.
    1950s
  • bee
    ( n ) A frisbee. Hey, let's hit the quad and throw the bee.
    1980s
  • bee's knees
    ( np ) Something excellent, outstanding. Mavis, that new perfume you got is the bee's knees!
    1920s
  • beef
    ( n ) A disagreement, argument. After we ignored Jim we had a beef with his whole crew.
    1940s
  • beef
    ( n ) A complaint. Why are you complaining? What's your beef?
    1920s
  • beef
    ( v ) To complain. Stop beefing about the curfew; you can't do anything about it.
    1920s
  • beefcake
    ( n ) Well-proportioned male. Alan Ladd was considered beefcake in his time.
    1950s
  • Beemer
    ( n ) A BMW car. He just bought a new Beemer to drive to work in.
    1980s
  • beeswax
    ( n ) Business. What's my name? None of your beeswax.
    1920s
  • beezer
    ( n ) A nose. Stan took one on the beezer when he told his wife to get him a beer.
    1910s
  • behind the 8 ball
    ( pp ) In trouble; disliked by someone. I forgot Mavis's birthday and now I'm behind the 8 ball.
    1930s
  • bell-bottom
    ( n ) A sailor. She has dated every bell-bottom in San Diego.
    1920s
  • bell-bottomed
    ( adj ) Flared at the end (pants). In those days all sailors wore bell-bottomed trousers.
    1890s
  • belt
    ( v ) To hit hard. Say that again and I'll belt you one in the kisser!
    1830s
  • belt
    ( v ) To sing out loudly. No one could belt 'God Bless America' like Kate Smith.
    1950s
  • belt
    ( n ) A drink of hard liquor. After a day like today, I need a belt before going to bed.
    1930s
  • bench
    ( v ) Remove from action. He was benched during the basketball playoffs.
    1950s
  • bender
    ( n ) A drinking spree. Every Monday Lucien comes home from a weekend bender.
    1940s
  • Benjamin
    ( n ) A one-hundred dollar bill. Hey, loan me one of those Benjamins until payday.
    1970s
  • bent
    ( adj ) Drunk or high on drugs. Jack got bent last night at that party.
    1990s
  • bent
    ( adj ) Upset, angry. After being bent for so many years, Barry is now a broken man.
    1930s
  • bent eight
    ( np ) A V-8 engine. He thinks he's hot in his new bent eight.
    1960s
  • bent out of shape
    ( ap ) Upset, angry. Don't get so bent out of shape.
    1960s
  • betty
    ( n ) A girl. Elizabeth is nothing special; just another betty.
    1990s
  • betty
    ( n ) A man who does a woman's work. Aw, you don't want to take a betty like him to the fights.
    1850s
  • bi
    ( adj ) Bisexual. I don't think he's gay; just bi.
    1960s
  • big cheese
    ( np ) An important person. He thinks that he is a big cheese just because he has a new Oldsmobile.
    1920s
  • big daddy
    ( np ) An older person. Preston is the big daddy I tell my troubles to.
    1950s
  • Big deal!
    ( int ) An interjection of dismissal. You sold your car for $500. Big deal! I got $750 for mine.
    1950s
  • big gun
    ( np ) An important person. The president brought two big guns to the meeting.
    1830s
  • big mouth
    ( np ) A talkative person. Shut up! You really have a big mouth.
    1880s
  • big shot
    ( np ) An important person. He thinks that he is a big shot just because he drives around in a Caddie.
    1920s
  • big six
    ( np ) A strong man. He's a big six in my book any day.
    1920s
  • big wheel
    ( np ) An important person. Stan thinks that he is a big wheel just because his dad owns the bank.
    1950s
  • biggie
    ( n ) Something important. It's just ice cream you spilled on my blouse, Marge, no biggie.
    1980s
  • bigwig
    ( n ) An important person. Imogene Ettasis is a bigwig in the human genome project.
    1700s
  • bilk
    ( v ) To swindle or cheat. The corporate executives bilked their employees out of millions of dollars.
    1670s
  • bill and coo
    ( v ) To hug and kiss. Don't you just love to bill and coo with your girl on the beach?
    1930s
  • bimbo
    ( n ) A mistress. Estelle's mother left her dad when she found him fooling around with some Italian bimbo.
    1960s
  • bimbo
    ( n ) A tough guy. Max is just another bimbo who goes around trying to pick fights in bars.
    1910s
  • bird
    ( n ) An eccentric. You never know what that old bird is going to do next.
    1920s
  • biscuits
    ( n ) Dirty, worn-out shoes. Look at that boy's biscuits.
    1990s
  • bit
    ( n ) An act, a part in something. I did my bit for the recovery effort when I helped clean out flood victims' houses.
    1960s
  • bitchin
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. She just got a real bitchin car.
    1980s
  • bite
    ( v ) To be bad. This job bites.
    1990s
  • biz
    ( n ) Business. Well, that's show biz.
    1940s
  • blab
    ( v ) To inform or tattle. Fritz blabbed to my parents about the other night.
    1600s
  • blabbermouth
    ( n ) Someone who talks too much. That blabbermouth told my girlfriend that he saw me with another girl.
    1930s
  • black-and-white
    ( n ) Police car. He was surprised to see his house surrounded by black-and-whites when he arrived home.
    1940s
  • blackball
    ( v ) To exclude from contact; to ostracize. They blackballed Harry Krashner from the Heaven's Devils motorcycle gang when someone saw him riding a ten-speed.
    1770s
  • blackhead
    ( n ) Pimple. His beard is coming out now and his blackheads are going away.
    1950s
  • blah
    ( adj ) Apathetic, indifferent. I feel so blah after taking five midterms in one day.
    1940s
  • blamed
    ( int ) Emphatic adjective. Hey, get your blamed hand off me!
    1830s
  • blast
    ( n ) A great time, something hilarious. We had a blast at Harriet's last night.
    1970s
  • blast
    ( v ) To shoot. I don't have anything to do with the mob; that's a good way to get yourself blasted.
    1940s
  • blasted
    ( adj ) Accursed. That blasted car of his never starts when he needs it.
    1680s
  • blasted
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. She was so blasted she couldn't tell her right hand from her left.
    1970s
  • blasted
    ( adj ) Emphatic adjective (substitute for damn). I wish Alonzo would keep his blasted nose out of my business.
    1680s
  • blessed
    ( adj ) Emphatic adjective. He didn't say a blessed word all night.
    1800s
  • blimp
    ( n ) A very fat person. I hate to have a blimp sitting next to me when I fly.
    1930s
  • blind date
    ( np ) A date you have never met before. The bonehead never went out on blind dates because he thought they were with girls who couldn't see.
    1920s
  • bling
    ( n ) Glitter from so much jewelry. Check you out all the bling on David tonight.
    1990s
  • bling-bling
    ( n ) Lots of jewelry or luxury in general. Did you see all the bling-bling in Donald Trump's house on TV?
    1980s
  • blingy
    ( n ) Shiny, sparkly. She looks like a proper tart in that blingy outfit she is in.
    2000s
  • blitzed
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He was so blitzed he couldn't find his shoes.
    1950s
  • blivet
    ( n ) Something unimportant or indescribable. We need a blivet to get this thing to work and I have no idea what kind.
    1940s
  • blizzie
    ( n ) Marijuana cigarette. Fire up that blizzie, man.
    1970s
  • block baller
    ( np ) Big time dealer. He faces a long term; he was a block baller.
    1990s
  • blockhead
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. Don't let that blockhead hold the money; he'll lose it for sure.
    1550s
  • blog
    ( n ) A web log, a web journal. He keeps a blog on his website.
    1990s
  • blonde moment
    ( np ) A stupid act or move. Don't mind me, I'm having a blonde moment.
    1990s
  • blood
    ( n ) Friendship. I don't do anything without him; we're blood.
    1980s
  • blow
    ( v ) To leave. I'm going to blow out of here now.
    1950s
  • blow
    ( v ) To waste, lose. He blew all his money gambling.
    1940s
  • blow a fuse
    ( vp ) Lose your temper. Hey, don't blow a fuse.
    1940s
  • blow away
    ( v ) Greatly impress someone. I was blown away by his donation of a million dollars.
    1960s
  • blow away
    ( v ) To defeat roundly. We blew the competition away.
    1970s
  • blow off
    ( v ) To defeat in competition. We blew off the other team 98-54.
    1970s
  • blow off
    ( v ) To fail miserably. I hear she blew off Chem 374.
    1960s
  • blow off
    ( v ) To skip, to not attend. I think I blew off bio a few times too many.
    1980s
  • blow the doors off
    ( vp ) To easily beat another car in a race. He blew the doors off that stone of Benny's.
    1970s
  • blow your cool
    ( vp ) Get angry, mad. Calm down, girl, don't blow your cool.
    1960s
  • blowback
    ( n ) Negative reaction to something said or done. I got very little blowback from suggesting we skip bonuses this year if the company goes into bankruptcy.
    1960s
  • blowhard
    ( n ) A talkative braggart. That old blowhard thinks he won the Korean War single-handedly.
    1850s
  • blue
    ( adj ) Sad, depressed. What's wrong, Meg? You look a little blue.
    1550s
  • bluenose
    ( n ) A puritanical person, a prude. The party was filled with so many prudes and bluenoses nobody had any fun.
    1920s
  • blues
    ( n ) Depression, melancholy. Her boyfriend left her singing the blues
    1910s
  • boat
    ( n ) A large luxurious car. Hey, man, I saw you cruising around in that old boat of your dad's
    1950s
  • bob
    ( adj ) To shorten. Why to they bob the tails of some dogs?
    1750s
  • bobo
    ( n ) Bad, of poor quality. Not up to standard. That shirt is bobo.
    1980s
  • boff
    ( v ) To have sex with. [Use your imagination].
    1970s
  • boff
    ( v ) To hit. He gets into trouble at home when he boffs his brother.
    1930s
  • bogart
    ( v ) To hog something. Don't bogart that joint, my friend.
    1970s
  • bogus
    ( adj ) Bad, unfair. That exam was totally bogus.
    1970s
  • bogus
    ( adj ) False, fake. They caught him passing bogus money.
    1830s
  • bojangle
    ( v ) To act crazy. She's straight bojangling when she tries out for modeling jobs.
    1990s
  • bomb
    ( n ) Something bad or cheap. The movie was a bomb.
    1990s
  • bomb-diggity
    ( adj ) Extremely cool or interesting. The bomb-diggity chick walked by my locker.
    1980s
  • bombed
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. The driver of the car was bombed.
    1950s
  • bomby
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. It was a bomby party, man.
    1990s
  • bon-diggity
    ( adj ) Attractive; good-looking. You are so bon-diggity.
    1990s
  • bone
    ( v ) To have sex with. [Use your imagination].
    1980s
  • bone (up)
    ( v ) To study hard. I can't go anywhere tonight; I have to bone (up) for my chemistry test.
    1849s
  • bone yard
    ( np ) A junk yard. I found a good set of mud flaps at the bone yard.
    1960s
  • bonehead
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. That bonehead let the air out of his own tires!.
    1900s
  • boner
    ( n ) A mistake, an error I must have pulled a real boner on the test; I flunked it.
    1910s
  • boner
    ( n ) An erection. I get a boner every time Maureen comes into the room.
    1960s
  • bones
    ( n ) Dice. Seven come eleven! Throw those bones, man!
    1620s
  • bones
    ( n ) Money. I don't have enough bones to go anywhere.
    1990s
  • bong
    ( n ) A marijuana pipe. He either has either been puffing his bong or someone has gone bong! with something on his head.
    1960s
  • bonkers
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. That noise they call music is driving me bonkers.
    1940s
  • boo
    ( n ) A boyfriend or girlfriend. Keep your hands off my boo , girl!
    1990s
  • boo
    ( n ) Marijuana. He just came back from Mexico with a load of boo.
    1950s
  • boo
    ( n ) Nothing, something insignificant. That threat of his doesn't mean boo.
    1960s
  • boo-boo
    ( n ) A mistake, error. If you make another boo-boo like that, you won't have a job.
    1950s
  • boob
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person That boob O'Reilly picked his nose three times at the dinner table.
    1930s
  • boob
    ( n ) (Offensive) A woman's breast. What's gotten into you, Ruby Sue? You look like your boob got caught in the wringer.
    1940s
  • boob tube
    ( n ) Television, TV. Ronald, if you can pull yourself away from the boob tube for a minute, clean up your room.
    1960s
  • booboisie
    ( n ) All boobs (knuckleheads) taken as a class. I'm never invited to Riley's parties: he only invites the cream of the local booboisie.
    1920s
  • booby
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person That booby, Claude McCann, left the tiger cage open again!
    1690s
  • booby
    ( n ) (Offensive) A woman's breast. What's gotten into you, Ruby Sue? You look like your booby got caught in the wringer.
    1930s
  • boocoo
    ( adj ) Much, a lot. I don't have boocoo time to help you with that.
    1920s
  • boocoos
    ( n ) A large amount. I had boocoos of money before the market crashed.
    1920s
  • booger
    ( n ) A bit of dried nasal mucus. Hey, Jeremiah, you have a booger hanging from your nose.
    1920s
  • booger
    ( n ) A brat, a rascal. I gave the little booger $5 to put gas in my car and he spent it on his girl.
    1940s
  • booger
    ( n ) A disgusting female. I can't believe you went out with that booger.
    1980s
  • boogie
    ( v ) To dance wildly to the late 60s style of rock (from the boogie-woogie of the late 30s and 40s). I love this music; let's boogie.
    1960s
  • boogie
    ( v ) To leave. The witching hour is coming up; let's boogie to it.
    1980s
  • boogie-woogie
    ( n ) Jazz of the 30s and 40s. Boogie-woogie is really cutting the rug!
    1930s
  • book
    ( v ) To drive fast. He was booking over a 100 when they caught him.
    1980s
  • book
    ( v ) To leave. I've got to get home; let's book.
    1990s
  • book
    ( v ) To register an arrest. They just booked Rusty for forging checks.
    1940s
  • book
    ( v ) To study hard. I have to get to the library and book the rest of the night.
    1960s
  • boombox
    ( n ) A large portable music box. Will you turn your boombox down so we can talk?
    1970s
  • boondocks
    ( n ) An isolated place in the country. He lives somewhere out in the boondocks.
    1940s
  • boondoggle
    ( n ) A con game, a deceitful transaction. Government contracts are often thinly veiled boondoggles.
    1930s
  • boondoggle
    ( n ) A gadget, especially something braided from leather. Cowboys often spent their free time making boondoggles for their saddles.
    1850s
  • boondoggle
    ( v ) To swindle or cheat. Heathcliff was boondoggled into selling his car for half of its value.
    1930s
  • boone
    ( v ) To swindle or betray. Don't trust him; he'llboone you every time.
    1990s
  • boone
    ( n ) Traitor, betrayer. Don't trust him; he's a boone.
    1990s
  • boost
    ( v ) To make happy, pleasantly surprise. He was boosted when he got an A on math.
    1990s
  • boost
    ( v ) To steal. I think he boosted those sneakers.
    1950s
  • booster
    ( n ) A strong supporter. She is a big booster of the high school football team.
    1890s
  • boot
    ( n ) Dismissal from work. I hear Ken got the boot at work today.
    1880s
  • boot
    ( n ) Someone of legal age who buys liquor for minors. Francis is my regular boot but I know others when I'm thirsty.
    1990s
  • boot
    ( v ) To fire. They booted Ken today; he is out of a job.
    1880s
  • boot
    ( v ) To vomit. Watch out! Looks like she's going to boot.
    1970s
  • boot
    ( n ) Dismissal, firing. I heard Lester got the boot and is looking for a new job.
    1880s
  • bootie
    ( n ) The buttocks. She has a good figure with a nice bootie.
    1970s
  • bootleg
    ( n ) Bad, unfair. That test was totally bootleg.
    1980s
  • bootleg
    ( adj ) Illegal, smuggled. His dad made enough money running bootleg liquor to open a bank before Prohibition ended.
    1920s
  • bootsie
    ( n ) Bad, no good. Man, that teacher is bootsie.
    1990s
  • booty
    ( n ) Bad, unfair. An 11 o'clock curfew? Man, that's booty!
    1990s
  • booty
    ( n ) Stolen goods or money. The hijackers hid their booty in the boot of the car.
    1470s
  • booty
    ( n ) The buttocks. Scope out the booty on that chick!
    1950s
  • booze
    ( n ) Liquor or other alcoholic beverage. I promised to bring two bottles of booze to the party.
    1940s
  • bop
    ( v ) To dance wildly to the big band jazz of the 40s. We bopped all night at Collingwood's last night.
    1940s
  • bop
    ( v ) To go. Let's bop on down to the laundromat.
    1960s
  • bop
    ( v ) To hit. Frannie bopped me on the head, mommy!
    1930s
  • bopper
    ( n ) A male or female who chases the opposite sex. Stay away from that bopper, girl; he's nothing but trouble.
    1990s
  • bork
    ( v ) To vomit. Rupert paid $50 for his dinner with Muriel, then borked it on the road home.
    1970s
  • boss
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Oh, man, he drives a real boss set of wheels.
    1980s
  • bounce
    ( v ) To fire. She was bounced after she refused to work overtime.
    1880s
  • bounce
    ( v ) To force to leave. Malcolm got so boisterous in the bar they bounced him.
    1880s
  • bounce
    ( v ) To leave. This party is whack, man. Let's bounce.
    1980s
  • bouncer
    ( n ) A bully. That bouncer always tries to get his way.
    1830s
  • bouncer
    ( n ) Someone who forces obnoxious people out of public places. Marvin had a few too many at the bar last night and the bouncer ejected him.
    1880s
  • Bouya!
    ( int ) An interjection of triumph. Bouya! I told you, you couldn't beat me at tennis.
    2000s
  • boy
    ( int ) Form of address to a male in the South. How are you doing, boy? I haven't seen you in a 'coon's age.
    1850s
  • Boy!
    ( int ) An emphatic interjection. Boy, was he surprised when I showed him my new erector set!
    1910s
  • bozo
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. That bozo doesn't know ham from a hammer.
    1920s
  • brad
    ( n ) A well-built male. This guy Ashley is totally brad.
    1990s
  • brand
    ( adv ) Very. He has a brand new car.
    1570s
  • brass
    ( n ) High ranking officials. When the brass hears about this, they aren't going to like it.
    1890s
  • brass
    ( n ) Impudence, gall, effrontery. He had the brass to tell the teacher off.
    1620s
  • bread
    ( n ) Money. I need some bread to pay for my car.
    1960s
  • break
    ( n ) Opportunity. A lucky break helped him get the job.
    1910s
  • break
    ( v ) To leave. I have To leave. now; it's time to break (out of here).
    1950s
  • break down
    ( v ) To stop functioning. My car broke down and I had to walk home.
    1800s
  • break down
    ( v ) To stop resisting. He broke down after 20 hours of grilling and confessed.
    1800s
  • break up
    ( v ) To end a relationship. Bev and Ben broke up over Ben's gambling.
    1480s
  • break up
    ( v ) To make laugh; explode in laughter. Everything she says breaks me up.
    1820s
  • break your back
    ( v ) To exert yourself. I'm not going to break my back helping him load those stones.
    1650s
  • breeze
    ( n ) A joke. That prof thinks he's funny but he don't know anything but breezes.
    1990s
  • breeze
    ( n ) Something easy to do. Cutting your own hair is a breeze!
    1920s
  • breezer
    ( n ) A convertible car. Let's put the top down on the breezer and let the wind blow through our hair.
    1920s
  • brew
    ( n ) Beer. I think George had one too many brews.
    1960s
  • brewski
    ( n ) Beer. Let's go down to the inn and have a few brewskis.
    1970s
  • brick
    ( n ) A good person. Don't say anything bad about Percival; he's a brick if ever there was one.
    1840s
  • brick
    ( adj ) Cold. Turn up the heat, it's brick in here.
    1990s
  • bring-down
    ( n ) Disappointment, a saddening event. The news of the crash was a major bring-down.
    1980s
  • bro
    ( n ) A close male friend or relative. He's my main bro, bro.
    1980s
  • bro
    ( int ) A male appellation. Hey, bro, whassup?
    1980s
  • broad
    ( n ) A woman (offensive). Never tangle with that broad; she's tough.
    1940s
  • brodown
    ( n ) A boy's night out together. Lenny isn't at home; he went to the putt-putt golf course for a brodown with his buddies.
    2000s
  • broke
    ( adj ) Without money. I'm broke man; don't ask me for money.
    1930s
  • bromance
    ( n ) Friendship between males. Linus Allup has no time for women because of his bromance with Quentin.
    2000s
  • Bronx cheer
    ( np ) Blowing air through the closed lips to make a disgusting sound. When he cut in front of the taxi, he received a Bronx cheer from the cabbie.
    1920s
  • brown-nose
    ( n ) A toady, teacher's pet. The creepy brown-nose is the teacher's pet.
    1950s
  • brown-nose
    ( v ) To toady. He gets low grades even though he brown-noses every teacher in school.
    1950s
  • brown-noser
    ( n ) A toady, teacher's pet. Farley is the biggest brown-noser in school.
    1950s
  • brush off
    ( v ) To rebuff, snub. Carly brushed off all my advances like I was a bug.
    1940s
  • brush-off
    ( n ) A rebuff, snub. Every time I ask dad for a job, I get the brush-off.
    1940s
  • buck
    ( n ) A dollar. He only got 50 bucks for that old heap of his.
    1850s
  • buck
    ( np ) Money. I need to make a quick buck.
    1930s
  • buck
    ( v ) To intimidate someone. They tried to buck him but he didn't back down.
    1990s
  • buddy
    ( int ) Form of address for a male in the South. Hey, buddy, can you spare a dime?
    1930s
  • Buddy Roe
    ( int ) A threatening form of address for a male in the South. Look out, Buddy Roe, or you'll get into trouble!
    1920s
  • buff
    ( adj ) Muscular. That dude is totally buff.
    1990s
  • buff
    ( n ) Nude, nudity. To come to the door in the buff.
    1800s
  • bug
    ( n ) A burglar alarm system. He was caught when he broke into a house that was bugged.
    1920s
  • bug
    ( n ) A fanatic. Milton is the greatest baseball bug I've ever known.
    1840s
  • bug
    ( n ) A fault or defect. There is a bug somewhere in my software that no one can find.
    1880s
  • bug
    ( n ) A passion, obsession. Ronald has the baseball bug and doesn't miss a game.
    1830s
  • bug
    ( v ) To act crazy. Marvin must have been bugging when he told me to see that crappy flick!
    1980s
  • bug
    ( v ) To annoy, bother. What's bugging you?
    1960s
  • bug
    ( v ) To equip with a burglar alarm. The coppers caught him when he entered a bugged house.
    1910s
  • bug
    ( v ) To hide a live microphone. I think they've bugged my apartment.
    1950s
  • bug out
    ( v ) To leave. I've got exams tomorrow; time for me to bug out.
    1960s
  • bug-eyed
    ( adj ) Wide-eyed with astonishment. I've never seen anyone so bug-eyed as Turnips when I showed him the $100 bill.
    1920s
  • bulky
    ( n ) A policeman. Keep the noise down or you'll bring the bulkies down on you.
    1840s
  • bull
    ( n ) Nonsense. Everything you've said is just a load of bull and you know it.
    1910s
  • bull
    ( n ) A policeman. Everyone was having fun until the bulls broke it up.
    1850s
  • bull session
    ( np ) An informal conversation. The boys got together at Raphael's for an all-night bull-session.
    1920s
  • bum
    ( adj ) Bad, no good. What a bum trip that project was.
    1850s
  • bum
    ( v ) To borrow. Can I bum ten bucks until the end of the week?
    1940s
  • bum
    ( v ) To depress. That really bums me!
    1950s
  • bum out
    ( v ) To depress. I was really bummed after I heard the news.
    1950s
  • bum rap
    ( np ) False accusation. They kept him after school for smoking in the men's room but he got a bum rap.
    1940s
  • bum's rush
    ( np ) Ejection by force. Stanley became so obnoxious, we had to give him the bum's rush to get him out.
    1920s
  • bummer
    ( n ) Bad news. My trip to New York was a bummer.
    1960s
  • bump off
    ( v ) To kill. The boss thought we ought to bump off the informer.
    1920s
  • bumpkin
    ( n ) A clumsy, unsophisticated person from the country. I don't know what she sees in that country bumpkin she goes with.
    1680s
  • bunk
    ( adj ) Bad, no good. Dad told me to go to my room. he's so bunk!
    1990s
  • bunk
    ( n ) Nonsense. He said he aced the chem exam. That's bunk!
    1900s
  • buns
    ( n ) The buttocks. The new guy has cute buns!
    1960s
  • bupkis
    ( n ) Nothing, zip. I worked all day for him and he gave me bupkis!
    1940s
  • burn
    ( v ) To catch, punish. Buffy got burned for shop-lifting.
    1970s
  • burn out
    ( v ) To become jaded, no longer effective. I've worked on this job so long that I'm burnt out.
    1960s
  • burn rubber
    ( vp ) To screech your tires pulling out. That car is so powerful it can burn rubber in second gear.
    1950s
  • burn up
    ( v ) Make angry, mad. That really burns me up!
    1930s
  • burnips
    ( adj ) Very cold. It's burnips outside; grab a jacket.
    1990s
  • bust
    ( n ) A failure. The whole idea was a bust.
    1840s
  • bust
    ( v ) To capture or arrest. He got busted for lifting hubcaps.
    1960s
  • bust
    ( v ) To leave. Yo, I'm bored; let's bust.
    1990s
  • bust out
    ( v ) To escape. His mother and three of her buddies busted out of prison but was caught 3 days later.
    1930s
  • bust out
    ( v ) To leave. Let's bust out of here and shoot some hoops.
    1950s
  • bust rocks
    ( vp ) To exert yourself. Let's go bust rocks on the dance floor.
    1980s
  • bust rocks
    ( vp ) To serve time in prison. Yeah, if you do that, you'll be busting rocks for 10 years.
    1940s
  • bust your butt
    ( vp ) To exert yourself. Rachel busted her butt working for her father and he never appreciated it.
    1950s
  • bust your chops
    ( vp ) To scold, chastise. I'm going to bust his chops for leaving his date at the party when I see him.
    1940s
  • buster
    ( n ) A loser, a jerk. Don't mack on him; he's just a buster.
    1980s
  • butt
    ( adj ) Bad, of poor quality. That dress is totally butt! Why are you wearing it?
    1990s
  • butter
    ( adj ) Something excellent, outstanding. His new backpack is pure butter.
    1990s
  • butter up
    ( v ) To flatter in order to get something from someone. Don't think I'll loan you the money if you butter me up.
    1700s
  • butterflies in the stomach
    ( n ) Fearfulness, stage fright. Every time I talk to her I have butterflies in my stomach.
    1900s
  • buttery
    ( adj ) Bad, ugly. That new CD is buttery; turn it off.
    2000s
  • buy it
    ( vp ) To die. If you don't slow down, you're going to buy it in a car accident.
    1960s
  • buy the farm
    ( vp ) To die. If you don't kick the ice cream habit you're going to buy the farm.
    1940s
  • buzz
    ( n ) Gossip. Have you heard the latest buzz?
    1600s
  • buzz
    ( n ) Tipsiness. I had a buzz on after the third martini.
    1940s
  • buzz
    ( v ) To shave (your head). I head he got buzzed over the weekend.
    2000s

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