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Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

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233 Results in C (You are getting Full results. Get Clean Results for "C")

  • cabin-fever
    ( n ) Irritability from being cooped up indoors. I'm getting cabin-fever; I'm going fishing.
    1910s
  • cactus
    ( n ) Something doomed. When I get up with him, he's cactus!
    2000s
  • cake
    ( adj ) Easy, simple. I didn't need to study so hard for that test. It was cake or a cake course.
    1970s
  • call
    ( n ) Prediction, interpretation. The weatherman made a good call about when the storm would come.
    1950s
  • call on the carpet
    ( vp ) To scold, chastise. The third time Winfred was late for work the boss called him out on the carpet.
    1900s
  • call-girl
    ( n ) A prostitute who makes appointments by telephone. Miriam was a call-girl before she became a guidance counselor.
    1940s
  • can
    ( n ) A bathroom or toilet. Do you know where the can is around here?
    1950s
  • can
    ( n ) Jail or prison. Grady just got out of the can and is on parole.
    1940s
  • can
    ( v ) To fire. She talked back to the boss and got canned.
    1900s
  • can
    ( n ) The buttocks. Frieda slipped on a banana peel and fell on her can.
    1930s
  • can of corn
    ( n ) Something easy. That test was a can of corn.
    1990s
  • cancer stick
    ( n ) A cigarette. Hey, man, don't light up that cancer stick.
    1960s
  • candy
    ( n ) An extremely good looking guy or girl. What a nice couple! They are pure candy.
    1980s
  • candyass
    ( n ) A weak, indecisive person. Get that candy-ass out of here; he can't do anything right.
    1970s
  • canned
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. The woman is canned; have her husband take her home.
    1920s
  • canoodle
    ( v ) To hug and kiss. Their parents caught them canoodling in the living room.
    1850s
  • cap
    ( n ) A bullet. I have piece but no caps.
    1980s
  • cap
    ( v ) To capture or arrest. If you don't quiet down, I'll have to cap you.
    1580s
  • cap
    ( n ) To punch someone in the face. Slow down or I'll cap you one.
    1990s
  • cap
    ( v ) To shoot. They said they were going to cap that guy.
    1980s
  • caper
    ( n ) A crime. Sturgeon thought he was a master mind but the cops caught up with him after 4 or 5 capers.
    1920s
  • caramello
    ( adj ) Busy, with a full schedule. I can't go to the mall today; I am totally caramello all afternoon.
    1990s
  • carry a torch
    ( vp ) To love someone. Maxwell's carrying a torch for Madeleine.
    1920s
  • cash
    ( v ) To use up, finish off. We cashed a 12-pack of Mountain Dew before he came over.
    1980s
  • cat
    ( n ) A spiteful woman or prostitute. His wife is a cat who makes his life miserable.
    1670s
  • cat
    ( n ) A guy. He was a real cool cat.
    1950s
  • cat house
    ( np ) A bordello. We had the most excitement here last night than we have had since the cat house caught fire.
    1930s
  • cat's meow
    ( np ) Something excellent, outstanding. Wow, Kathleen! That new hat is the cat's meow.
    1920s
  • cat's pajamas
    ( np ) Something excellent, outstanding. I hear LaVern's new Duisenberg is the cat's pajamas.
    1920s
  • catch
    ( n ) A hidden condition on an offer. You'll sell me your car for $200? What is the catch?
    1850s
  • catch feelings
    ( vp ) To get an attitude. Just because she was talking to your boo, don't go catching feelings.
    1990s
  • catch on
    ( v ) To understand a tricky concept. Sam calls the ranch he gave his sons the 'Focus' Ranch because it is where the son's raise meat. Catch on?
    1880s
  • catch on
    ( v ) To be picked up by a lot of people. My record was played on several radio station but it didn't catch on.
    1880s
  • catch some rays
    ( vp ) To sunbathe. I'm going to lie on the beach and catch some rays.
    1960s
  • catch some z's
    ( vp ) To sleep. I need to catch some Z's before I go on my trip.
    1960s
  • catty
    ( adj ) Spiteful. She made a catty remark that upset Linda.
    1950s
  • certifiable
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. Stay away from that woman; she's 100 percent certifiable.
    1930s
  • cha
    ( int ) Whatever; as if. Go out with that dork? Cha!
    1990s
  • chanky
    ( adj ) Disgusting, nasty, ugly. Who was that chanky chick I saw you with last night?
    2000s
  • chariot
    ( n ) Car. That old chariot of his won't make it to San Francisco.
    1950s
  • chassis
    ( n ) The female figure. She is a lovely lady with a classy chassis.
    1920s
  • chauncy
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Your new jersey is chauncy!
    1990s
  • cheaters
    ( n ) Eyeglasses. He can't see past the end of his nose without his cheaters.
    1920s
  • cheba
    ( n ) Marijuana. What a town! There's nowhere you can score any cheba.
    1990s
  • check out
    ( v ) Look at, examine. Check out that shorty over there.
    1950s
  • check out
    ( v ) To leave. It's time for us to check out, Suzy; there's a funny smell in the air.
    1950s
  • cheddar
    ( n ) Money. No wonder he is always happy; that fellow has phat cheddar.
    1990s
  • cheese
    ( n ) Money. That cat right there makes some serious cheese.
    1980s
  • cheese
    ( v ) To smile. Don't look so down, man, cheese me one.
    1990s
  • cheese-balled
    ( adj ) To be under a great deal of stress. I was pretty cheese-balled over final exams.
    1990s
  • cheesecake
    ( n ) Photography of well-proportioned women. Betty Grable was a popular piece of cheesecake during World War II.
    1930s
  • cheesy
    ( adj ) Cheap. That is really a cheesy looking outfit.
    1940s
  • cherry
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That new rod of James's is pure cherry.
    1960s
  • cherry
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. That new rod of James's is a real cherry.
    1960s
  • chew out
    ( v ) To scold, chastise. Dad's going to chew you out when he sees the dent in the car.
    1940s
  • chew the fat
    ( vp ) To spend time talking. We were just chilling, chewing the fat.
    1890s
  • chew the rag
    ( vp ) To spend time talking. Let's just spend the evening at home and chew the rag.
    1880s
  • chicken
    ( n ) Coward. Don't be a chicken.
    1940s
  • chicken out
    ( v ) To back out from cowardice. We were going to do some bungee jumping but my mom chickened out.
    1940s
  • chief
    ( n ) A big shot. He thinks he's the chief but he's just another nobody.
    1950s
  • chill
    ( v ) To relax, take it easy. Chill out, man; don't let them get you riled.
    1970s
  • chill
    ( v ) Spend time with talking. We're just going to chill at my place after class.
    1980s
  • chill out
    ( v ) To relax, take it easy. Chill out, man; don't let them get you riled.
    1980s
  • chillax
    ( v ) Spend time with talking. I was just chillaxing with the homies.
    1990s
  • chintzy
    ( adj ) Cheap. That really was a chintzy present you got him.
    1930s
  • chips
    ( n ) Money. I have to find a job somewhere because I need chips badly.
    1990s
  • chisel
    ( v ) To swindle or cheat The bum chiseled me out of $100!
    1800s
  • chizzil
    ( v ) To relax, take it easy. What are you doing? Ah, nothing. I'm just chizziling.
    1990s
  • choice
    ( adj ) Really cool, hot, attractive. That girl with the tight sweater is really choice.
    1340s
  • choke
    ( v ) To panic and be unable to function. Don't choke. We've still got time to study for the final.
    1950s
  • chonies
    ( n ) Underpants. My chonies were riding up all day.
    1990s
  • chop
    ( n ) A personal musical phrase used by a jazz musician. He not only has some great chord progressions, but his chops are out of sight.
    1960s
  • chop
    ( v ) To break down and sell the parts of a car. He worked in a chop shop until the police raided it.
    1970s
  • chop
    ( v ) To criticize. I got chopped for scratching my brother's bike.
    1990s
  • chopper
    ( n ) A customized motorcycle. On weekends Lawrence rides the highways with a herd of guys on choppers.
    1980s
  • chopper
    ( n ) A helicopter. Melvin always takes a chopper to the airport.
    1970s
  • chopper
    ( n ) Tooth. My dad's teeth were bad but he bought a new set of choppers last week.
    1940s
  • chops
    ( n ) Jaws, mouth. His chops are moving constantly.
    1610s
  • chow
    ( n ) Food. The chow in that restaurant is crappola.
    1850s
  • chow down
    ( v ) To eat. I need to find a place to chow down.
    1950s
  • chowderhead
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. Lorenz is such a chowderhead he calls his friends 'bra' not 'bro'.
    1830s
  • chrome-dome
    ( np ) A bald guy (offensive). The old chrome dome told me that grass doesn't grow where there is a lot going on.
    1940s
  • chrome-plated
    ( adj ) Dressed up. Madeleine came to the party chrome-plated.
    1980s
  • chuck up
    ( v ) To vomit. He chucked up most of his dinner on the porch.
    1940s
  • chump
    ( n ) A foolish or gullible person. The poor chump can't get a date for the big dance.
    1860s
  • chump-change
    ( n ) A small amount of money. $50 for this board? Man, that's chump-change.
    1960s
  • chumpy
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. That was a not just a good movie; it was the chumpy.
    1990s
  • church key
    ( np ) Can or bottle opener. I need to open a Coke; does anyone have a church key?
    1950s
  • circle
    ( v ) To marry. I hear Heddie and Clyde got circled last week.
    1990s
  • circus wagon
    ( np ) A car with an outlandish paint job. Hey, man, you have to repaint this circus wagon.
    1960s
  • clam
    ( n ) A dollar. Hey, this suit cost me 20 clams!
    1920s
  • clam up
    ( v ) To refuse to speak When I asked Joe Bones where he got the money for the car, he clammed up.
    1910s
  • class act
    ( n ) An excellent, outstanding person. My best buddy is a class act.
    1970s
  • classy chassis
    ( np ) Great female figure. She is a sassy lassie with a classy chassis.
    1950s
  • clean
    ( adj ) OK, alright. Have you seen his new wheels? They are clean, man.
    2000s
  • clean-shaven
    ( adj ) Upright, straight, dependable. Why don't you run around with some clean-shaven kids instead of those punk rockers?
    1960s
  • clear off
    ( v ) To leave. Clear off and don't come back!
    1820s
  • clear out
    ( v ) To leave. I don't like it here; I'm going to clear out
    1850s
  • clink
    ( n ) Jail or prison. You had better clean up your act or you will end up in the clink.
    1770s
  • clip
    ( v ) To steal. He clips something every time he goes into a store.
    1920s
  • clip
    ( v ) To kill. Da god fadda wants we should clip Johhny Two-Faces tonight.
    1940s
  • clock
    ( v ) To hit. Fred, you had better chill with that or I'm going to clock you in the grill.
    1980s
  • clod
    ( n ) A clumsy, unsophisticated person from the country. That new guy is a clod straight from the country.
    1700s
  • clod
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. What a clod Broderick is; he hasn't the sense to come in out of the rain.
    1990s
  • clodhopper
    ( n ) A clumsy, unsophisticated person from the country. There are days when I think we have nothing but clodhoppers in the office.
    1820s
  • clodhoppers
    ( n ) Heavy, coarse work shoes. Malcolm! Get your muddy clodhoppers out of my kitchen!
    1830s
  • close call
    ( np ) Near catastrophe, very dangerous situation. Buffy had a close call with the police when she ran a stoplight.
    1870s
  • clothes horse
    ( n ) Someone obsessed with clothing. Maureen is a clothes horse who spends most of her life shopping.
    1850s
  • clown
    ( v ) To make fun of. Man, are you trying to clown on me?
    1990s
  • clue in
    ( v ) Let someone in on something. Are you going to clue me in on what your plans are for tonight?
    1970s
  • clueless
    ( adj ) Having no idea what is going on. Don't rely on Bunny, she is clueless.
    1960s
  • clunker
    ( n ) A old, beat-up car. I can't go on a date in that old clunker.
    1950s
  • clutch
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That chocolate cake you brought to the office was clutch.
    1990s
  • Clyde
    ( n ) Term of address for males. Let it slide, Clyde; it isn't that important.
    1950s
  • coals
    ( n ) Cigarette. Be careful you don't sit on my coals.
    1980s
  • coals
    ( n ) Ashes from a cigar or cigaret. Hey, man, don't flip your coals on the carpet!
    1980s
  • cock-eyed
    ( adj ) Crazy, cockamamie. A solar-powered flashlight? What kind of cock-eyed idea is that?
    1940s
  • coin
    ( n ) Money. I need something to eat, dude; do you have any coin?
    1400s
  • coins
    ( n ) Money. It's going to take some serious coins to get us into that concert.
    1980s
  • cold
    ( adj ) Unemotional. I find Phillip rather cold.
    1170s
  • cold
    ( adv ) Completely, immediately. Marguerite stopped Paul cold with her question.
    1900s
  • cold
    ( adj ) That is no longer or can no longer be pursued. After 24 hours, all the leads in the case were cold.
    1940s
  • cold fish
    ( np ) An unresponsive person. My date for the dance was such a cold fish I left without him.
    1940s
  • collar
    ( v ) To capture or arrest. I knew they would collar the robber sooner or later.
    1970s
  • come onto
    ( vp ) To flirt with, try to seduce. He came onto me but I wasn't interested.
    1960s
  • come up for air
    ( vp ) Take a break. He has to come up for air or he will die from exhaustion.
    1970s
  • come up on
    ( vp ) To steal. I'm fixing to come up on that pack of chocolate muffins.
    1990s
  • comeuppance
    ( n ) Just reward. I hope Wimplesnatch gets his comeuppance for cheating all those people.
    1850s
  • commodore
    ( n ) A slow computer. I'll never finish my assignment on this commodore!
    1980s
  • communist
    ( adj ) Stupid or foolish. Man, this test is so communist.
    1990s
  • con
    ( v ) To swindle or cheat. Don't try to con me.
    1880s
  • confuddle
    ( v ) To confuse, befuddle. Oh, Buffy, all these figures just confuddle me! I don't know if I have enough money for a movie or not.
    2000s
  • conk
    ( v ) To hit. I think a brick must have fallen and conked Fuzzy on the noggin.
    1920s
  • conk
    ( v ) To hit. He threw the brick straight up in the air and when it came down, it conked him on the noggin.
    1820s
  • conniption
    ( n ) A fit, seizure. Now, Mabeleine, don't have a conniption, but I forgot the laundry.
    1830s
  • conversate
    ( v ) To converse. I saw Mick and Jagger standing on the corner conversating a minute ago.
    2000s
  • cook
    ( v ) To do something right. Now, you're cooking! Keep on doing it that way.
    1950s
  • cook with gas
    ( vp ) To do something right. As soon as he got the grip on his golf clubs right, he was cooking with gas.
    1940s
  • cook your goose
    ( vp ) Get you in trouble. As soon as he opened his mouth, he cooked his own goose.
    1840s
  • cookie
    ( n ) Guy or gal. He's a tough cookie.
    1940s
  • cookie-cutter
    ( adj ) Identical. The twins wear cookie-cutter clothes all the time.
    1960s
  • cool
    ( adj ) Slow, romantic (music). I like my jazz cool, not hot.
    1950s
  • cool
    ( adj ) Knowledgeable about the current scene. Jed is cool, man, you can talk to him.
    1950s
  • cool
    ( adj ) OK, alright. I'm cool with that.
    1950s
  • cool
    ( adj ) All told, every bit of. He made a cool million (dollars) in the animal waste business.
    1720s
  • cool
    ( v ) To kill. The mob cooled him a year or so ago.
    1930s
  • cool beans
    ( np ) Amazing, incredible. Man, that her apple pie is cool beans, I mean, really!
    1970s
  • cool down
    ( v ) To calm down. Things should cool down in a day or two.
    1940s
  • cool head
    ( np ) Someone in control. Look, the boat is sinking. We need a cool head in charge.
    1950s
  • cool it
    ( vp ) To calm down. If you guys don't cool it, the neighbors are going to complain.
    1960s
  • coolio
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Her new bikini is coolio, dog.
    2000s
  • cootie
    ( n ) A body louse. I wouldn't go out with him; they say he has cooties.
    1910s
  • cop
    ( n ) A policeman. The cop showed me his badge.
    1940s
  • cop
    ( v ) To steal. How did you get the road sign? I copped it.
    1870s
  • cop out
    ( v ) To give up or give in. We were going to do some bungee jumping but mom copped out.
    1960s
  • copacetic
    ( adj ) OK, alright. Everything between me and my baby is copacetic.
    1920s
  • copper
    ( n ) Policeman. Where are the coppers when you need one?
    1840s
  • corked
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. Lorimar is too corked to go home alone.
    1920s
  • corker
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. Boy, that storm last night was a real corker, wasn't it?
    1880s
  • corny
    ( adj ) Simple-minded, trite. I get so tired of Hugh Jeego's corny jokes I don't know what to do.
    1930s
  • couch potato
    ( np ) A lazy person who watches too much TV. He is a couch potato.
    1970s
  • couch-surf
    ( v ) To sleep on different couches each night. Hey man, where you staying? Dude, I'm couch surfing right now.
    1980s
  • cougar
    ( n ) An older woman dating a younger man. I saw Harold with a notorious cougar at the movies last night.
    2000s
  • cough up
    ( v ) To give up, stop holding back. I know you have my glove; now, come on, cough it up.
    1890s
  • cow
    ( n ) A fit. When she saw the damage to her car, she had a cow.
    1950s
  • cow
    ( n ) An obnoxious or misfortunate woman. Poor cow, having to live with that man.
    1860s
  • cow college
    ( np ) An agricultural college. He grew up on a farm and went to a cow college when he graduated from high school.
    1950s
  • cowboy up
    ( v ) To get strong, tough. Bo Dega cowboyed up at the bar last night and left with a black eye.
    2000s
  • crack
    ( adj ) Expert. Jeremy was a crack reporter for the Chronicle for years.
    1800s
  • crack
    ( n ) Rock cocaine. Crack isn't all it is cracked up to be.
    1970s
  • crack open
    ( vp ) To open a bottle. Let's crack open a bottle for his birthday.
    1940s
  • crack up
    ( ap ) Praise, be reputed. Rhoda isn't all she is cracked up to be.
    1820s
  • crack up
    ( v ) To make laugh. That Trudy cracks me up with her jokes.
    1940s
  • crackalack
    ( v ) To happen, take place. Hey dude, what's crackalacking?
    1980s
  • crackass
    ( adj ) Something bad or cheap. Her crackass boyfriend came to the formal in cut-offs.
    1980s
  • crackberry
    ( n ) A PDA someone is addicted to. You can't talk to Winne since she got her new crackberry.
    2000s
  • cracked
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. Lureen must be cracked to think that she can make the men's team.
    1700s
  • cracked out
    ( adj ) Out of touch. Francis puffed a little too much and is totally cracked out.
    1980s
  • cracker
    ( n ) A white person (offensive). That cracker just doesn't get jive.
    1930s
  • crackers
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. He offered me $250 for my Stutz-Bearcat. He must be crackers!
    1920s
  • crackhead
    ( n ) A person addicted to crack cocaine. He was a crackhead but now he is trying to get straightened out.
    1970s
  • crackhead
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. You hear Johnny jumped off his roof? Yeah, he's such a crackhead!
    1990s
  • crackpot
    ( n ) A crazy person with unworkable ideas. Thor Pearson has some crackpot idea about making powdered water.
    1910s
  • cram
    ( v ) To study hard. He didn't study all semester and had to cram before exams.
    1930s
  • crank
    ( n ) Irritable, short-tempered person; an eccentric person. That crank Josephine told me to buzz off when I asked her for a dollar.
    1830s
  • cranked
    ( adj ) Excited, enthusiastic. When do you want to start painting the house? I'm cranked to get hopping.
    1970s
  • cranky
    ( adj ) Irritable, short-tempered. Don't ask Marvin for a raise today: he got out of bed cranky and has remained that way.
    1850s
  • crap
    ( n ) Nonsense. Cut the crap and let's get to work.
    1890s
  • crappappella
    ( adj ) Bad, of poor quality. That flick was totally crappapella.
    1990s
  • crappola
    ( adj ) Bad, of poor quality. The chow here is totally crappola.
    1970s
  • crappola
    ( n ) Nonsense. Cut the crappola and let's get to work.
    1970s
  • crappy
    ( adj ) Bad, of poor quality. That cafe has the crappiest food in town.
    1840s
  • crash
    ( v ) Go to bed; go to sleep. I got to go crash; I'm so tired from partying all night.
    1960s
  • crash
    ( v ) Totally collapse. I came home from shopping all afternoon and just crashed on the sofa.
    1950s
  • crate
    ( n ) An old car or plane. You can always find some schnook to sell that old crate of yours to.
    1930s
  • Crazy!
    ( int ) An interjection of surprise. Their relationship crashed when he grew the beard.
    1960s
  • cream
    ( v ) To badly damage. He ran into a tree and totally creamed his dad's car.
    1960s
  • cream
    ( v ) To beat or defeat roundly. Our team creamed them when we played on our home court.
    1950s
  • creechy
    ( adj ) Eccentric, odd, peculiar. Her house was creechy with all those skeletons.
    1990s
  • creep
    ( n ) A mean, despicable person. That creep ran off with my girl.
    1940s
  • creep
    ( n ) A sneak thief. He was making a marginal living as a creep until the cops caught him at his trade.
    1910s
  • creep
    ( v ) To cheat on someone romantically. I've been creeping on my boyfriend.
    1990s
  • creepy
    ( adj ) Scary, repulsive. It is so creepy in our attic, I'm afraid to go up there.
    1950s
  • crewcut
    ( n ) A haircut so short that the hair stands straight up. All his friends have crewcuts; I only mess around with guys wearing duck tails.
    1950s
  • crib
    ( n ) Where you live. Have you found a crib yet?
    1980s
  • crib
    ( v ) To steal or plagarize. He cribbed most of his term paper from the Web.
    1740s
  • crib notes
    ( np ) Forbidden notes taken to an exam. Farnsworth couldn't past this test with crib notes.
    1940s
  • croak
    ( n ) To die. If I take another bite I am going to croak.
    1940s
  • croon
    ( v ) To sing (lovesongs) in the lowest range of the voice in a conversation al style Mike Raffone likes to croon a few toons now and then.
    1790s
  • crooner
    ( n ) A man who croons. (Bing Crosby was the first crooner.) That raspy-voiced Rusty Horne thinks he's a crooner!
    1930s
  • crop duster
    ( np ) A car with loud glasspacks. I can hear his crop-duster coming a mile away.
    1960s
  • crow
    ( v ) To brag, boast. Marlene can't stop crowing about her new boyfriend.
    1520s
  • crown
    ( v ) To hit someone over the head. Helen Highwater crowned her old man on the head with a frying pan.
    1940s
  • cruise
    ( v ) To drive around aimlessly and flirt. The skier was cruising down the hill.
    1950s
  • crumb
    ( n ) A mean, despicable person. The dirty crumb walked out and stuck me with the tab.
    1910s
  • crummy
    ( adj ) Bad, no good Where did you get such a crummy baseball mitt?
    1940s
  • crump
    ( adj ) Feeling good. I'm crump, man, let's have some fun.
    1990s
  • crunch
    ( n ) Climax, critical point. Bertie is someone you can count on in a crunch.
    1930s
  • crunk
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. The scene at the club last night was totally crunk.
    1990s
  • crush
    ( n ) An infatuation. She has a crush on her teacher and spends all day studying biology.
    1920s
  • crushed
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He came home crushed and his mom was waiting in the living room.
    1990s
  • crusty
    ( adj ) Dirty, grimy. Hey, man, how did you get so crusty?
    1980s
  • cube
    ( n ) An old-fashioned person. He's pretty cool but his rents are cubes.
    1970s
  • cuddle
    ( v ) To hug and kiss. Let's go over to my front porch and cuddle some.
    1930s
  • cup of tea
    ( np ) Something you like. Playing quoits on a Sunday afternoon is not quite my cup of tea.
    1930s
  • cupcake
    ( v ) To hug and kiss in public. I get so sick of seeing Phil Anders and Lucy Lastic cupcaking I don't know what to do.
    2000s
  • curtains
    ( n ) The end. If we don't win this game, it's curtains for the coach.
    1910s
  • cushy
    ( adj ) Easy, simple. He has a really cushy job with a septic tank cleaner.
    1910s
  • cut
    ( v ) To dilute. They cut the whiskey with water at that bar.
    1930s
  • cut
    ( v ) To miss, to not attend. Let's cut physics today and go to the library.
    1950s
  • cut
    ( v ) To record. She cut a new record last week.
    1940s
  • cut out
    ( v ) To leave. It is late; I have to cut out.
    1950s
  • cut-throat
    ( n, adj ) Cold, unemotional (person). Barb Dwyer is a cut-throat businesswoman.
    1560s

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