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Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

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150 Results in D (You are getting Clean results. Get Full Results for "D")

  • D. A.
    ( abb ) A man's long hair style with the sides combed to the back of the head, then parted with a downward stroke of the comb. He has gorgeous blond hair that he combs in a D. A..
    1950s
  • da bomb
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. That raked 'Vette of his is da bomb!
    1990s
  • dad-blamed
    ( adj ) An interjection of emphasis (euphemism for G. D.) That is none of your dad-blamed business.
    1940s
  • daddy
    ( n ) A rich male protector who usually expects favors from his female charge. Tillie has a (sugar) daddy who takes care of all her bills.
    1920s
  • daddy-o
    ( Int ) Term of address for males. OK, daddy-o, let's hit the road!
    1950s
  • damage
    ( n ) The cost. Lets get the bill and find out the damage.
    1960s
  • dame
    ( n ) A female (offensive). She's a swell dame; I like her a lot.
    1920s
  • damn straight
    ( int ) Absolutely correct. You're damn straight, I'm never going to ride with him again.
    1960s
  • dang
    ( int ) Emphatic adjective (euphemism for damn). I'll be dang if I didn't leave my watch at home!
    1940s
  • Dang nabbit!
    ( int ) An interjection of disappointment. Dang nabbit! I dropped my chewing gum.
    1940s
  • danged
    ( int ) Emphatic adjective (euphemism for damn). I'll be danged if I didn't leave my watch at home!
    1940s
  • darn
    ( adj ) Emphatic adjective (euphemism for damn). Why are you so darn quiet?
    1780s
  • darned
    ( adj ) Emphatic adjective (euphemism for damned). Why are you so darned quiet?
    1780s
  • date
    ( n ) A person of the opposite sex you go out with. I have a hot date tonight, so I won't be able to go out with you guys.
    1920s
  • date
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. He is such a soppy date, he should do well in politics.
    1910s
  • dead
    ( adj ) Quiet. This disco is really dead tonight.
    1930s
  • dead presidents
    ( n ) Money. Hey, ma, let me have some dead presidents.
    1980s
  • dead soldier
    ( n ) An empty beer bottle. They were in the living room surrounded by a case of dead soldiers.
    1920s
  • deadbeat
    ( n ) Someone who doesn't pay his or her bills. I wouldn't go out with that deadbeat; he will stick you with the bill every time.
    1860s
  • deal
    ( n ) To date only one person. She's and Chad are still dealing after 2 years.
    1990s
  • decent
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That car is really decent!
    1980s
  • deck
    ( v ) To knock down. He was decked in the fight.
    1950s
  • deck out
    ( adj ) Dress up. Fred was really decked out for his date with Wendy.
    1940s
  • deep pockets
    ( np ) Much money. Her boyfriend has deep pockets.
    1930s
  • dern
    ( int ) Emphatic adjective (euphemism for damn). Oh, heck! I locked the dern keys in the car!
    1770s
  • dibs
    ( n ) A claim. I have dibs on the shotgun seat.
    1930s
  • dicey
    ( adj ) Risky. Since the weather is a little dicey, I won't go today.
    1950s
  • dick
    ( n ) A private investigator. Sally hired a private dick to tail her husband.
    1920s
  • diddly-squat
    ( n ) A small, worthless amount. Leslie doesn't know diddly-squat about football.
    1960s
  • dig
    ( v ) To enjoy. Margie really digs jazz of the 40s.
    1970s
  • dig
    ( v ) To study hard. He spent the night digging and still failed the exam.
    1860s
  • dig
    ( v ) To understand. Can you dig this music, man?
    1960s
  • digits
    ( n ) Telephone number Give me your digits and I'll holla back when I get home.
    2000s
  • digs
    ( n ) Home or apartment. Let's go over to my digs and have a nightcap.
    1890s
  • dike
    ( n ) A prissy, well-dressed male. He is something of a dike, which puts many of the boys off.
    1850s
  • dilly
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. Lester Workwithe just bought a dilly of a car from
    1910s
  • dime
    ( n ) A 10-cent piece. I can't go anywhere; I don't have a dime in my pocket.
    1780s
  • dime
    ( n ) An attractive female. Lucy's I perfect dime; I really dig her.
    1990s
  • dinero
    ( n ) Money. Let's go with Fred; he has much dinero.
    1980s
  • ding-bat
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. Archie Bunker always called his wife a ding-bat.
    1910s
  • dingy
    ( adj ) Dirty, grimy. Leave your dingy clothes in the garage.
    1730s
  • dip
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. The guy who flunked four out of five classes is really a dip.
    1930s
  • dipstick
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. The dipstick has her dress on backwards.
    1960s
  • dirty
    ( adj ) Morally bad, dishonorable. I hear that the dirty rat went to a dirty movie last night.
    1590s
  • dis
    ( v ) To say something disrespectful. I went out of my way to help her but she dissed me anyway.
    1980s
  • dish
    ( n ) Pretty woman. Now, that Bobby Sue, she's a real dish!
    1940s
  • dish
    ( n ) Something you like. Playing quoits on a Sunday afternoon is not quite my cup of tea.
    1930s
  • dish (out)
    ( v ) To serve, to do something hard or harsh. Tommy isn't afraid of flamers; he can dish it out with the best of them.
    1930s
  • ditch
    ( v ) To leave someone who is with you. I'll ditch my younger brother with my grandmother.
    1940s
  • ditty
    ( n ) A short song. Since me a little ditty before you go to bed.
    1300s
  • ditty
    ( n ) A trinket. Give me that ditty, will you?
    1990s
  • ditz
    ( n ) A scatterbrain. The ditz drove her car through the back of the garage!
    1980s
  • ditzy
    ( adj ) Scatterbrained. She is a beautiful woman but a little ditzy.
    1980s
  • dive
    ( n ) A cheap bar. I wouldn't drink any of the hooch they serve in that dive.
    1920s
  • dive
    ( n ) A disreputable eating or drinking establishment. Prudence avoided the kind of low dives Curly liked to frequent.
    1870s
  • dizzy
    ( adj ) Goofy, crazy. Some dizzy blonde at the station sold me the wrong ticket and I ended up in Schenectady instead of New York.
    1500s
  • do in
    ( v ) To kill or destroy. His business was doing well until the hurricane destroyed his store and did him in.
    1900s
  • do-hickey
    ( n ) An object for which a name is unavailable. Gert, do you know what this do-hickey on my tricycle is for?
    1910s
  • docker
    ( n ) A party located in a remote area. Greg's having a docker on Saturday.
    1980s
  • dodge water under the bridge
    ( n ) Ruse, deceptive maneuver. He didn't use that old dodge about his old war wound preventing him from mowing the lawn, did he?
    1840s
  • dodge the bullet
    ( vp ) To luckily avoid misfortune. When the draft was around, I dodged the bullet because I was flat-footed and my dad was the mayor.
    1960s
  • doe
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. Which one of you does locked the keys in the car?
    1990s
  • dog
    ( n ) A foot. Boy, are my dogs tired!
    1920s
  • dog
    ( n ) A guy. He doesn't have much upstairs but I love the dog.
    1990s
  • dog
    ( n ) An ugly female (offensive). Nobody asks her out because she is such a dog.
    1970s
  • dog
    ( int ) Form of address to a male. Hey, dog, what cracking?
    1990s
  • dog
    ( np ) Problem. It's too bad she broke her leg but that's not my dog.
    1990s
  • dog
    ( v ) To follow relentlessly. She dogged me all the way home.
    1940s
  • dog-gone
    ( adj ) Emphatic adjective. I don't know a dog-gone thing about the girl.
    1850s
  • doggone
    ( int ) Emphatic adjective. I don't know a doggone thing about that.
    1850s
  • dogpack
    ( n ) A circle of male friends, a clique. Your dogpack always watches your back, no matter what you do.
    1990s
  • doke
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Your new car is doke!
    1990s
  • doll
    ( n ) An attractive female. Maria was quite a doll when she dressed up.
    1920s
  • doll up
    ( v ) Dress up, dress stylishly. So where are you going, all dolled up?
    1900s
  • dolly
    ( n ) A girl or a woman. He liked to pick up dollies at the local bars.
    1940s
  • dome
    ( n ) The head or skull. Look at old chrome dome (bald guy) over there.
    1940s
  • Don't take any wooden nickels
    ( phr ) Don't do anything stupid. When you go to the big city, Luke, don't take any wooden nickels.
    1920s
  • done for
    ( adj ) In big trouble, finished. I just let the car roll into the lake. I'm done for when the rents find out.
    1940s
  • doobs
    ( adj ) Bad, of poor quality. That song is totally doobs.
    1990s
  • doodad
    ( n ) Decorative article. Maybelle's house is full of fancy doodads she brought back from her world travels.
    1900s
  • doodly-squat
    ( n ) A small, worthless amount The president doesn't know doodly-squat about running a country.
    1930s
  • doofus
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. That doofus studied for the wrong exam and failed.
    1960s
  • doofus
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. Sunny Day is such a dufus; she thinks Minnesota is a soft drink.
    1960s
  • doohickey
    ( n ) An object for which a name is unavailable. There is something wrong with some little doohickey on my car engine.
    1910s
  • doozy
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. He came home with a doozy of a knot on his head.
    1920s
  • dope
    ( n ) A narcotic. There are a lot of dope dealers around here.
    1880s
  • dope
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. That dope doesn't know if he is coming or going.
    1850s
  • dope
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Check out this dope ride.
    1980s
  • dope
    ( n ) Information. So what's the latest dope on Jamie?
    1940s
  • dork
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. He is such a dork he spends his time downtown watching the parking meters.
    1970s
  • dotty
    ( adj ) Silly, crazy. Wearing a polka dot dress to a funeral is not surprising for someone as dotty as Maude Lynn Dresser.
    1880s
  • double-cross
    ( v ) To betray. He promised to pay me for painting his room but double-crossed me and didn't.
    1900s
  • douche bag
    ( np ) A weak, indecisive person. That old douche bag does whatever his wife tells him to do.
    1960s
  • dough
    ( n ) Money. Horace has a lot of dough, let's ask him to lend us some.
    1850s
  • down
    ( adj ) Agreeable to. I'm down for going to the movies tonight!
    1970s
  • down
    ( adj ) Depressed. I've been down ever since I got the 'D' in physics last week.
    1960s
  • down
    ( v ) To drink quickly, to gulp down. Let's go to a bar and down a few beers.
    1860s
  • down the tubes
    ( ap ) In deep trouble or out of business. My English grade is down the tubes; I missed the final.
    1950s
  • down to
    ( adv ) Up to, depends on, is their responsibility. I'm afraid the choice is down to you, now, Lucy.
    1970s
  • downer
    ( n ) A depressant. My life is enough of a mess; I don't need to take downers.
    1960s
  • downer
    ( n ) Something depressing or disappointing. Flunking my home ec test is such a downer!
    1960s
  • downsize
    ( v ) To fire people. They are downsizing the company by 1000 jobs.
    1980s
  • drag
    ( n ) A draw (on cigarette, cigar, pipe, etc.). Hey, man, give me a drag on that pipe so I can see if that tobacco is any good.
    1910s
  • drag
    ( n ) A squelcher. Sunny is such a drag I would never invite her to my parties.
    1850s
  • drag
    ( v ) To race another car a short distance. He loved to drag (race) until the cops picked him up.
    1950s
  • drag
    ( n ) Something depressing or disappointing. Sunny is such a drag I would never invite her to my parties.
    1950s
  • dragnet
    ( n ) A widespread seach. The police put out a dragnet for the guy who beat you up.
    1900s
  • dragon
    ( n ) Bad breath. Do you have a breath mint? I have a bad case of the dragon.
    1990s
  • dragster
    ( n ) A car designed for drag racing. You'll never beat his dragster on the quarter mile.
    1950s
  • drain
    ( n ) A place from which there is no return. I can see all my efforts to get into a good college going down the drain.
    1950s
  • drain
    ( v ) To tire, exhaust, wear out. That girl had totally drained me; I wish she'd leave.
    1950s
  • drape
    ( v ) To consume or overcome. I'm totally draped by this final project.
    1990s
  • Drat!
    ( int ) Interjection of frustration. Drat! I think I lost my lucky cat's foot!
    1810s
  • Drats!
    ( int ) Interjection of frustration. Drats! I just broke my watchband!
    1820s
  • dreamboat
    ( n ) An extremely attractive person. Buster is such a dreamboat he had Sally snowed on the first date.
    1940s
  • drill
    ( v ) To tease. I don't know why you are drilling me when you are wearing your little brother's shirt.
    1990s
  • drink
    ( n ) Large body of water: sea, ocean, lake, river. Gill and Fish were goofing off on the pier and fell in the drink.
    1830s
  • drip
    ( n ) A weak, indecisive person. That drip doesn't know how to tie his shoes.
    1930s
  • drop
    ( v ) To kill. Don't move or I'll drop you in your tracks.
    1940s
  • drop
    ( v ) To knock down. Say another word and I'll drop you.
    1930s
  • drop
    ( v ) To take drugs. Are you going to drop that pill or not?
    1960s
  • drop a dime
    ( vp ) To inform or tattle. Man, he dropped the dime on Tommy.
    1960s
  • Drop dead!
    ( int ) Absolutely not! Drop dead! I'll never go out with you.
    1930s
  • druthers
    ( n ) Preference, choice. If I had my druthers, I would stay home tonight.
    1880s
  • dry up
    ( v ) To stop talking. Why don't you dry up? Nobody cares what you think.
    1850s
  • dub
    ( n ) 20 inch chrome rims or wheels. I saw him riding on dubs yesterday.
    1970s
  • dubdub
    ( n ) WWW, the URL prefix. So yo, check Jenny McCarthy out at dubdub dot mtv dot com.
    1990s
  • duck
    ( n ) A snobbish, a conceited female. I can't stand that duck; I don't care how much money her dad has.
    1990s
  • duck soup
    ( np ) Crazy, insane. Man, you're duck soup if that's the way you think.
    1990s
  • duck soup
    ( np ) Excellent, outstanding. Wow, Granger is duck soup at everything he does.
    1970s
  • duck soup
    ( np ) Something easy. All her courses are duck soup.
    1910s
  • duckets
    ( n ) Money. That car must have cost somebody some serious duckets.
    1980s
  • duckies
    ( n ) Money. I'm low on duckies; can you loan me $5 till Friday?
    1990s
  • ducktail
    ( n ) A man's long hair style with the sides combed to the back of the head, then parted with a downward stroke of the comb. He is a cool cat with a ducktail, pegged pants, an blue suede shoes.
    1950s
  • ducky
    ( adj ) OK, alright. Everything was just ducky between them.
    1890s
  • dud
    ( n ) Something that doesn't work properly. He bought a new refrigerator but it is a dud--it doesn't keep anything cold.
    1940s
  • dude
    ( n ) A guy. The dudes are in the living room and the gals, in the kitchen.
    1970s
  • dude
    ( int ) Form of address to a male. Hey, dude, what's happening?
    1970s
  • duds
    ( n ) Clothes. I see you got some new duds for the dance.
    1930s
  • duffer
    ( n ) An incompetent person. Les Fairway is just a duffer when it comes to golf.
    1840s
  • Duh!
    ( int ) An interjection indicating the listeners must be stupid. You don't know Jenny McCarthy? Duh! Everybody knows who she is.
    1980s
  • dumb Dora
    ( np ) A stupid female. What a dumb Dora she is: when her husband asked if she like the new China, she replied, 'No, I hate the communists.'.
    1920s
  • dumps
    ( n ) Depression, melancholy. His girl left him and now he is in the dumps.
    1920s
  • dust
    ( v ) To kill. I could have you dusted (off) tomorrow, you rat.
    1940s
  • dust off
    ( v ) To kill. The mob dusted him off when he ratted on them.
    1940s
  • dust off
    ( v ) To reactivate, resurrect. Why not dust off your old tap dance routine for the show.
    1950s
  • dweeb
    ( n ) A studious, unsociable person. They only communicate by computer; they are the perfect dweeb couple.
    1980s
  • dyke
    ( n ) A prissy, well-dressed male. He is something of a dyke, which puts many of the boys off.
    1850s
  • dynamite
    ( n ) Heroine. He is a lovely man but they say he is addicted to dynamite.
    1920s
  • dynamite
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. His grandmother is really dynamite.
    1940s

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