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Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

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140 Results in F (You are getting Full results. Get Clean Results for "F")

  • fab
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. I think a fire on the hearth is simply fab.
    1960s
  • face
    ( adv ) To engage in something heavily or extremely. Tonight I am going to drink face.
    1980s
  • face time
    ( np ) A chance to meet people. There's some great face time on the quad.
    1980s
  • face-off
    ( n ) Confrontation. The two sides were headed for a nasty face-off.
    1970s
  • fade
    ( v ) To leave. I have homework to do, man, let's fade.
    1930s
  • faded
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. We got so faded from drinking beer at the Beta party.
    1990s
  • fag
    ( n ) A cigarette. Give me a fag, man; I'm having a nicotine fit.
    1940s
  • fag
    ( n ) A homosexual. It turned out to be a gay bar full of fags.
    1920s
  • fairy
    ( n ) A homosexual. The fairy was ironing his socks when I stopped to pick him up.
    1890s
  • fake out
    ( v ) To cheat or deceive. He faked me out when he told me the 'Vette was his.
    1960s
  • fall for
    ( v ) To be deceived, tricked. I told him that my dad was the President of the United States and he fell for it.
    1900s
  • fall for
    ( v ) Fall in love with. The moment Moine saw Phillippe she fell for him like a ton of bricks.
    1910s
  • fall guy
    ( np ) A scapegoat. They dumped all the evidence in Preston's locker, deciding to let him be the fall guy.
    1920s
  • fall out
    ( v ) To sleep. After working until midnight on homework, I fell out quickly.
    2000s
  • fantabulous
    ( adj ) Fantastic, fabulous. Billy did a fantabulous job on his science project.
    1950s
  • fantabulous
    ( adj ) Fantastic, fabulous. Gigi always throws fantabulous bashes.
    1950s
  • far out
    ( ap ) Amazing, incredible. That new pad of his is so far out you wouldn't believe it.
    1960s
  • fat city
    ( np ) A great thing or place; Happy. Ever since I got the new job I've been living in fat city.
    1970s
  • fat-head
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. The fat-head thought Moby Dick is a social disease.
    1940s
  • fathead
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. That fathead thought Moby Dick is a social disease.
    1940s
  • fazangas
    ( n ) Breasts. Did you see the fazangas on that girl?
    1950s
  • fed
    ( n ) FBI investigator. His dad made moonshine until the feds caught up with him.
    1910s
  • feddie
    ( n ) Money. He had a gang of feddies in his wallet!
    1990s
  • federal
    ( adj ) Out of the ordinary; extremely good. Those jeans of hers are purely federal.
    1990s
  • feel
    ( v ) To understand. You know me but do you feel me?
    1990s
  • feen
    ( v ) To crave. I'm feening for some chocolate ice cream today.
    1990s
  • fence
    ( n ) Dealer in stolen goods. Rocky couldn't find a fence to buy Elvis's underwear after he stole it.
    1700s
  • fess up
    ( v ) Confess, own up. Fess up, you love him, don't you?
    1950s
  • fiddle (with)
    ( v ) Try to do something to. Who's been fiddling with the TV? The picture is all red.
    1660s
  • fiddle (with)
    ( v ) Try to do something to. Who's been fiddling with the TV? The picture is all red.
    1660s
  • fiddle-de-dee
    ( int ) Nonsense! Fiddle-de-dee! You can't run a mile in four minutes!
    1780s
  • Fido!
    ( int ) An interjection of disgust. Fido! I don't ever want to talk to Percival again!
    1990s
  • fiend
    ( adj ) To need urgently. I'm fiending for something to drink.
    1990s
  • fierce
    ( adj ) Clumsy. That guy is so fierce, he stumbles over his own feet.
    1990s
  • fierce
    ( adj ) Excited. I'm fierce about that concert coming up this weekend.
    1990s
  • filch
    ( v ) To steal. He filched several items at the supermarket but they caught him in the parking lot.
    1560s
  • fin
    ( n ) 5-dollar bill. Hey, Wayland, loan me a fin until payday.
    1920s
  • finger
    ( v ) Stick up the middle finger. When I told him he favored his dog a little, he fingered me.
    1950s
  • fink
    ( n ) An informer, a tattle-tale. You're such a ratty little fink. Why do you always tell mom everything I do?
    1950s
  • fire extinguisher
    ( np ) A chaperone. Priscilla was so hot, she could never go out without a fire extinguisher.
    1920s
  • fire up
    ( v ) Get someone excited. OK! I'm all fired up to get this math homework done!
    1950s
  • fire up
    ( v ) Start your engine. OK, fire it up and let's ride.
    1940s
  • fish
    ( n ) A college freshman. Hey, guys, the freshman looks like a fish out of water; let's make him water the shrubbery in the rain.
    1920s
  • fishy
    ( adj ) Suspicious, There is something fishy about his offer to trade me his Mercedes for my Chevy Malibu.
    1840s
  • five finger discount
    ( np ) Shoplifting. She and her friend were nabbed taking a five finger discount at the drugstore.
    1990s
  • fix
    ( n ) A bribe, bribery. The cops never pick up Joey because the fix is in.
    1920s
  • fix
    ( n ) Dose of narcotics. The addict needs another fix.
    1940s
  • fix
    ( v ) To bribe. Barney fixed the judge in his case, so he got off Scot free.
    1920s
  • fix-up
    ( n ) Dose of narcotics. He is an addict that needs 2 fix-ups a day.
    1860s
  • flake
    ( n ) An oddball, eccentric. Why did you ask Ahmed to take notes for you? He's the biggest flake I know.
    1960s
  • flake off
    ( v ) To leave. I told my brother to flake off because he was bothering me.
    1960s
  • flake out
    ( v ) Start acting peculiar, odd, eccentric. He was a good philosophy teacher before he fell in love with a hippy and flaked out.
    1960s
  • flaky
    ( adj ) Eccentric, odd, peculiar. He is too flaky to do the work.
    1960s
  • flame
    ( v ) To make an inflammatory comment. Nobby Neese can't talk about politics without flaming the Democrats.
    1980s
  • flame
    ( n ) A girlfriend, boyfriend, or lover. Phil Anders has dozens of old flames but has never been burned.
    1640s
  • flap your lips
    ( vp ) To talk. You can flap your lips all night but I won't change my mind.
    1940s
  • flapper
    ( n ) An exciting woman in short, stylish skirts and short hair. In her youth Purity was one of the best known flappers in town.
    1920s
  • flash
    ( v ) To speak angrily. What's up? Mom was just flashing.
    1980s
  • flat
    ( adj ) Out of air. The cause of the jostling was a flat tire.
    1920s
  • flat
    ( adv ) To the limit. A month after losing his job, he found himself flat broke.
    1830s
  • flat out
    ( adv ) To the limit. He was running the car flat-out.
    1950s
  • flat tire
    ( np ) A stupid female. I took that flat tire out once--never again!
    1920s
  • flat-out
    ( adv ) Plainly, directly. He flat-out lied to me.
    1950s
  • flat-top
    ( n ) A short men's hair style cut flat across the top so all the hair stands up. He cut off his ducktail and now he has a flat-top.
    1950s
  • flat-top with fenders
    ( np ) A short men's hair style cut flat across the top so all the hair stands up but with long sides. He didn't cut off all his ducktail; he has a flat-top with fenders.
    1970s
  • flatfoot
    ( n ) A policeman or detective. We have a flatfoot walking a beat by our house every day.
    1940s
  • flattop
    ( n ) Men's hairstyle: a crewcut flat across the top. He cut off his ducktail and now he has a flattop.
    1950s
  • flee the scene
    ( vp ) To leave. Come on, dudes; it's time to flee the scene.
    1960s
  • fleece
    ( v ) To swindle or cheat. A couple of con men fleeced Bernie Madoff out of a million bucks.
    1570s
  • flex
    ( v ) To show off. Check out Geoff; he's flexing in that new Mustang.
    2000s
  • flick
    ( n ) A movie. I haven't seen a good flick in a long time.
    1950s
  • fling
    ( n ) A short affair or romance. Phil Anders and Constance Noring had a brief fling that ended on a sour note.
    1820s
  • fling
    ( n ) A try or attempt at something. Horace gave flipping burgers a fling but decided it was not his cup of tea.
    1550s
  • flip
    ( v ) To lose control of yourself, go crazy. When I told him I had seen his girl with another boy he totally flipped.
    1960s
  • flip out
    ( v ) To lose control of yourself, go crazy. He flipped out when he heard that his mother had been killed.
    1960s
  • flip side
    ( np ) The other side (of a record). What kind of music do you have on the flip side of the tape?
    1950s
  • flip the bird
    ( vp ) Stick up the middle finger. I told him his dad word panty-hose and he flipped me the bird.
    1970s
  • flip your wig
    ( vp ) To lose control of yourself, go crazy. Josh got so mad at his brother that he flipped his wig.
    1940s
  • flip-flops
    ( n ) Thongs (that went on your feet). The beach was so stony we had to wear flip-flops.
    1960s
  • flip-top
    ( n ) A convertible car. He got sunburned riding around in his flip-top.
    1970s
  • flivver
    ( n ) A broken down car. Stewart will never get me into that old flivver his father drives.
    1930s
  • flivver
    ( n ) A Model T Ford. Sure, he's hot: he took me out in his dad's flivver.
    1920s
  • flodge
    ( v ) To fake, pretend or perpetrate a fraud. She was trying to flodge with that cell phone, because it isn't even on!
    1990s
  • floor
    ( v ) Push the accelerator to the floor. The coast is clear: floor it!
    1950s
  • floor
    ( v ) To knock down; to astound. Delbert floored the horse with one punch to the head.
    1640s
  • floozie
    ( n ) A woman of loose morals Juan Carlos came to the party with some floozie he picked up at a bar.
    1910s
  • floozy
    ( n ) A woman of loose morals Juan Carlos came to the party with some floozy he picked up at a bar.
    1910s
  • floss
    ( v ) To show off. She's going to floss for the dance tonight.
    1990s
  • floss
    ( v ) To show off your wealth. I hate to see her flossing her bling around school.
    2000s
  • flower child
    ( np ) A member of the counterculture of the 60s. She was a flower child in the 60s; now she is a broker on Wall Street.
    1960s
  • flummox
    ( n ) A failure. Foster is the greatest flummox the world has every known.
    1860s
  • flush
    ( adj ) wealthy, having much money Hey, guys, let's head downtown; I just got paid and I'm flush!
    1600s
  • fly
    ( v ) Be workable Your idea doesn't have legs; it won't fly.
    1930s
  • fly boy
    ( np ) An aviator, someone in the Air Force. Prunella is going with some fly boy out at the base.
    1920s
  • fly low
    ( vp ) To be cautious and on guard. She was flying low when she walked in so they wouldn't notice her.
    1990s
  • fly the coop
    ( vp ) To leave, elope, or escape. When he saw you coming up the walk, he flew the coop.
    1930s
  • foine
    ( adj ) Attractive. That chick in the blue dress is foine.
    1990s
  • folded
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. Kat got folded at the party last night and now she's grounded for a week.
    1990s
  • for real
    ( pp ) In truth, truly, really. You have a new car? Is this for real?
    1970s
  • Forget it!
    ( int ) I won't do it! You want me to lend you $5 for the movies? Forget it!
    1950s
  • fork out
    ( v ) Give, hand over. I have three daughters; do you know how much I will have to fork out for their weddings?
    1830s
  • fork over
    ( v ) Give, hand over. Ok, fork over that twenty bucks you owe me before I lose my cool!
    1830s
  • four on the floor
    ( np ) Four-speed gear shift in a car. That sports car has four on the floor, man, cool!
    1950s
  • four-flusher
    ( n ) A person who bluffs and deceives others. That no-good four-flusher tried told me that old tin can of his once belong to Mario Andretti.
    1890s
  • fox
    ( n ) A sexy or seductive woman. Lucille is a fox from her head to her toenails.
    1960s
  • foxy
    ( adj ) Sexy, attractive. She is a foxy lady.
    1970s
  • fracture
    ( v ) To make someone laugh. He fractures me with all his jokes and antics.
    1940s
  • frame
    ( n ) To give false evidence. My best friend tried to frame me for flushing the cherry bomb down the john by putting the rest of them in my locker.
    1920s
  • freak
    ( n ) A fanatic. He is some kind of ecology freak that doesn't read because he doesn't want to use paper.
    1940s
  • freak
    ( n ) A strange person. There were a bunch of freaky freaks at that party.
    1950s
  • freak
    ( v ) To lose control of yourself, go crazy. She freaked when she found out she needed another math class.
    1970s
  • freak out
    ( v ) To lose control of yourself, go crazy. She freaked out when she found out she needed another math class.
    1960s
  • freaky
    ( adj ) Scary. I was a little freaky in his house with all the lights off.
    1960s
  • fream
    ( n ) Someone who doesn't fit in. Don't invite that fream; nobody will know what to say to her.
    1990s
  • freddie frat
    ( n ) A fraternity brother. I don't know what all those freddie frats were at a townie party.
    1950s
  • freebie
    ( n ) Something that costs nothing. The pen was a freebie I picked up at a show.
    1940s
  • frenemy
    ( n ) A friend who betrays you. That frenemy of Daphne's posted revealing pictures of her on the Internet.
    1950s
  • fried
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He was so fried we rolled him to the car and he never came to.
    1920s
  • frigging
    ( adj ) Emphatic adjective. What is that frigging idiot doing here?
    1590s
  • frisk
    ( v ) To search someone. Billy goes to a school where students are frisked at the front door.
    1790s
  • fro
    ( n ) An Afro haircut. I liked him better in his fro back in the 60s.
    1970s
  • frog
    ( n ) Frenchman (offensive). No matter what you say, the frogs still make the best wine.
    1770s
  • frog
    ( n ) Hoarseness. I can't make a toast tonight; I have a frog in my throat.
    1900s
  • from nowhere
    ( adv ) Bad, no good. His taste in women is from nowhere, man.
    1950s
  • fromage
    ( n ) Something bad or of poor quality. That car of his is pure fromage.
    1990s
  • front
    ( v ) To brag. That girl was fronting about her dad being a millionaire!
    1990s
  • frosted
    ( adj ) Angry, mad. Boy, does all that corruption in Washington leave me frosted!
    1980s
  • frosty
    ( adj ) Cool. Stay frosty, dude.
    1980s
  • fruit
    ( n ) Homosexual. He is a fruit but he is very sweet.
    1930s
  • fruity
    ( adj ) Homosexual. It looks so funny for you to date girls in such fruity clothes.
    1940s
  • fubar
    ( adj ) Confused by alcohol or otherwise. I was totally fubar at Philip's party last night!
    1940s
  • fugly
    ( adj ) Extremely ugly. Her date is flat-out fugly.
    1990s
  • funda
    ( n ) A fundamental, a basic. His fundas are good but he can't seem to get the advanced stuff.
    1990s
  • funk
    ( n ) Body odor. You have some bad funk, man; don't you ever shower?
    1620s
  • funk
    ( n ) Down-to-earth, original jazz. I think their music has too much funk in it; I prefer something more modern.
    1950s
  • funky
    ( adj ) Eccentric, odd, peculiar. The group was playing funky music that you either loved or hated.
    1960s
  • funky
    ( adj ) Musically down-to-earth, original. I love that funky New Orleans sound.
    1950s
  • funky
    ( adj ) Smelly. I'm thinking that the milk is too funky to drink.
    1620s
  • funny farm
    ( np ) Insane asylum. Mack has been acting crazy lately. Did he just get off the funny farm?
    1960s
  • fuzz
    ( n ) The police. The car thief was picked up by the fuzz.
    1960s

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