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Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

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178 Results in G (You are getting Full results. Get Clean Results for "G")

  • G
    ( n ) A grand, $1000. Purvis left town owing me a "G."
    1920s
  • g-man
    ( n ) FBI investigator. G-men broke up his still and sent him up the river for 5 years.
    1940s
  • gag me
    ( vp ) How disgusting! Look! His crack is showing above his pants--gag me with a spoon!
    1980s
  • galoot
    ( n ) A strong, soft-hearted man. The big galoot brought me flowers after chasing away that wolf Hans from next door.
    1860s
  • gam
    ( n ) A woman's leg. She has a great figure and even greater gams.
    1920s
  • game
    ( n ) A story told by men to attract women. You should hear his game; he really knows how to come on to a girl.
    1980s
  • game
    ( n ) Something attractive, charm, je-ne-sais-quoi. That girl has game.
    1990s
  • gander
    ( n ) A look. Take a gander at that beefcake over there.
    1910s
  • gank
    ( v ) To steal. Dude, you ganked my lighter.
    1980s
  • garbage
    ( n ) Nonsense. Everything you are saying is pure garbage!
    1950s
  • garden path, the
    ( np ) Misleading direction, deception. I'm afraid Grady has led you down the garden path, baby. You'll never get your money back.
    1920s
  • gas
    ( n ) A great time, something hilarious. The party last night was a real gas! ).
    1940s
  • gas
    ( n ) A joke. They played some kind of gas on her and made her mad.
    1910s
  • gas
    ( n ) Empty, boastful talk. Don't listen to Tommy; he's full of gas.
    1840s
  • gasser
    ( n ) A great time, something hilarious. The new comedy on TV is a real gasser.
    1930s
  • gat
    ( n ) A gun (from Gatling gun). Paul, is that a gat under your coat?
    1940s
  • gay
    ( n ) A homosexual. Gays are at last getting equal treatment in society.
    1950s
  • gay
    ( adj ) Homosexual. There is nothing wrong with being gay.
    1950s
  • gear
    ( n ) Clothes. The new gear I got is all that.
    1980s
  • geck
    ( n ) An eccentric individual. Wayne's in another world; he's a total geck.
    1510s
  • gee
    ( n ) Something attractive, charm, je-ne-sais-quoi. She had a lot of gee going for her.
    1990s
  • Gee whiz!
    ( int ) An interjection of surprise (euphemism for 'Jesus'). Gee whiz! I didn't know George was that rich!
    1880s
  • Gee!
    ( int ) An interjection of surprise (euphemism for 'Jesus'). Gee! I didn't know George was that rich!
    1890s
  • geedis
    ( n ) Everything required to be an expert at something. I studied all weekend and, man, I've got the geedis for that test.
    1990s
  • geek
    ( n ) A studious, unsociable person. He is a geek so he keeps pretty much to himself.
    1950s
  • geek
    ( n ) Computer expert or devotee. Our company has the best geeks in the business.
    1970s
  • geek
    ( v ) To become or cause to become panicky. I was geeked when he asked me to come over and meet his family!
    1990s
  • geeze
    ( v ) Act like an old person (offensive). My grandparents just sit around the house and geeze.
    1990s
  • geezer
    ( n ) An old person (offensive). Those old geezers up there are driving too slowly.
    1940s
  • geezer rock
    ( np ) Music of the 1950s. Dad's listening to his geezer rock again.
    1980s
  • geri
    ( n ) An old person (offensive). Those geris drive too slow.
    1990s
  • get a load of
    ( vp ) Look at. Get a load of Frankie's new car!
    1940s
  • get a wiggle on
    ( vp ) Speed up. We're going to be late for the ballet--get a wiggle on!
    1920s
  • Get bent!
    ( int ) Absolutely not! Play chicken with you? Are you kidding? Get bent, man!
    1990s
  • get down
    ( vp ) To be engaged in an enjoyable activity. Man we are getting down with a couple freaks after class today.
    1960s
  • get first base
    ( vp ) Have initial success trying to seduce someone. He couldn't get to first base with her, let alone score.
    1930s
  • get hooked up with
    ( vp ) To meet. He got hooked up with Cindy at a party I threw.
    1970s
  • get into
    ( v ) Became seriously interested in. I got into gardening in high school.
    1960s
  • get it
    ( vp ) To come to understand, catch on. I told her the joke twice but she just didn't get it.
    1950s
  • get it on
    ( vp ) To do something. You want to go for pizza? Let's get it on!
    1970s
  • get it on
    ( vp ) To have sexual relations. I think he may have gotten it on with Matilda.
    1960s
  • get lost
    ( int ) To leave, go away. Stop bothering me! Get lost!
    1940s
  • get off slim-slow
    ( vp ) To lose weight. I know she doesn't think she is cute; she needs to get off slim-slow.
    1990s
  • get off your back
    ( vp ) To stop annoying, bothering. Get off my back, man; I'm tired of listening to you.
    1950s
  • get on your nerves
    ( n ) To annoy, bother. Go play in another room; you are getting on my nerves.
    1910s
  • get ones jig on
    ( vp ) To dance. I went to Mona's party last night and got my jig on with her.
    1990s
  • Get out of here!
    ( phr ) You're kidding me; I don't believe you. You won $500 at the track? Get out of here!
    1950s
  • Get real!
    ( vp ) Think again, that is ridiculous. You think it will be cold in Florida? Get real!
    1970s
  • get schooled
    ( vp ) To learn a hard lesson. If you play him one-on-one, you're going to get schooled!
    1980s
  • get under your skin
    ( vp ) To annoy, bother, annoy. These Friday quizzes are getting under my skin.
    1940s
  • get with it
    ( vp ) Hurry up. If you don't get with it, we will never finish this work.
    1960s
  • get with it
    ( vp ) To come to understand, become aware of what is what. If Sofia doesn't get with it, she will never be popular.
    1980s
  • get with the program
    ( vp ) To do what is right, conform. You had better get with the program, Sonny, or you're off the team.
    1980s
  • ghetto
    ( adv ) Very. The party last night was ghetto fabulous.
    1990s
  • ghetto bird
    ( np ) A police helicopter. Get off the street! Here comes a ghetto bird.
    1990s
  • ghetto blaster
    ( np ) A large portable music box. Man, he's got the loudest ghetto blaster in the 'hood.
    1980s
  • ghetto buster
    ( np ) A large portable music box. Hey, man, turn down that ghetto buster.
    1990s
  • ghetto sled
    ( np ) An old, beat-up car. Check out the guy in that lime green ghetto sled!
    1980s
  • ghost
    ( adj ) Gone, disappeared. As soon as Guido got his money, he was ghost.
    2000s
  • giddy
    ( n ) A good time, a lot of fun. It was a party where everybody got their giddies.
    1990s
  • gig
    ( n ) A job, especially in music. I have a gig on Saturday night from 7:00 to 10:00.
    1960s
  • giggle-water
    ( np ) Liquor or other alcoholic beverage. He poured me a glass of some kind of giggle water and that's the last thing I remember.
    1920s
  • gigolo
    ( n ) A kept man who lives off women. His mother has a gigolo that she spends a lot of time with.
    1920s
  • gimmick
    ( n ) A fun thing to do. Let's go see if we can find a gimmick for the evening.
    1990s
  • gin mill
    ( np ) A bar. She dragged me down to some gin mill where her sister sang and hoofed.
    1920s
  • ginchy
    ( adj ) Sexy. She is the ginchiest girl I've ever seen.
    1930s
  • give it to
    ( vp ) To do something (unpleasant) to someone. If you don't behave, I'm going to give it to you.
    1940s
  • give me five
    ( vp ) Shake hands. You passed the test? Give me five!
    1950s
  • give me some skin
    ( vp ) Shake hands. You got your driver's license? Give me some skin!
    1970s
  • give the finger
    ( vp ) Stick up the middle finger. I told him his mother wears combat boots and he gave me the finger.
    1950s
  • glad rags
    ( np ) Dressy clothes. Hey, Daisy, put on some glad rags and I'll take you to a ritzy night club.
    1920s
  • glasspack
    ( n ) A muffler packed with fiberglass improve performance and/or increase noise. He just added dual glasspacks to his rod and doesn't it sound wicked!
    1950s
  • glitch
    ( n ) A fault or defect. This computer program has a glitch.
    1960s
  • glitterati
    ( n ) Rich, famous people who love bright lights and cameras. All the glitterati turned out for the Academy Awards.
    1940s
  • glitzy
    ( adj ) Luxurious, posh. This is a pretty glitzy hotel to be staying in.
    1960s
  • gnarly
    ( adj ) (Surfing) Big or difficult. He wiped out on a gnarly wave.
    1980s
  • gnarly
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. She does a really gnarly job at computer programming.
    1980s
  • go
    ( adj ) A turn, a try. Let me have a go at solving the problem.
    1820s
  • go
    ( v ) To say. I go, wasn't that great? And he goes, naw, I've done it all before.
    1830s
  • go all the way
    ( vp ) To have sex with. The petted a lot but she never went all the way with him.
    1970s
  • go ape
    ( vp ) To lose control of yourself, go crazy. He went ape when his friends dropped a frog down his collar.
    1950s
  • go ballistic
    ( vp ) To lose control of yourself, go crazy. Freida went ballistic when I gave her the ring.
    1960s
  • go bananas
    ( vp ) To lose control of yourself, go crazy. I am going to go bananas if I don't have a vacation soon.
    1930s
  • go belly up
    ( vp ) To fail or go bankrupt. The company went belly up under his management.
    1940s
  • go down
    ( vp ) To happen, take place. What is going down?
    1960s
  • go postal
    ( vp ) To lose control of yourself, go crazy. My old lady went postal when she found out about my new lady.
    1980s
  • go steady
    ( vp ) To date only one person. They went steady for a year, then broke up.
    1930s
  • go Titanic
    ( vp ) To fail, lose. We were planning on catching a flick, but that went titanic.
    1990s
  • gob
    ( n ) A wad, a lump, large amount. I here Jack Uzzi has gobs of money.
    1540s
  • god squad
    ( np ) A fanatical religious group. Don't go inside; the god squad is there.
    1980s
  • gold digger
    ( n ) A female after a man's money. She doesn't love him; she is just a gold-digger after his money.
    1920s
  • gold-digger
    ( n ) A woman trying to marry a wealthy man. Do you really love me or are you just another gold-digger after my money?
    1920s
  • goldang
    ( int ) An interjection of emphasis (euphemism for G. D.). I'll be goldang if he didn't wreck his new car!
    1880s
  • goldarn
    ( int ) An interjection of emphasis (euphemism for G. D.). Now just wait a goldarn minute!
    1830s
  • goldbrick
    ( n ) Someone who does not do his or her share of the work. That goldbrick sits in his office all day and doesn't do a lick of work.
    1910s
  • golden
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. He had a golden opportunity to invest in the company but turned it down.
    1400s
  • golden arches
    ( np ) A Macdonald's restaurant. Let's get a burger at the golden arches.
    1960s
  • Golly!
    ( int ) An interjection of emphasis (euphemism for 'God'). Golly, that was a good breakfast.
    1770s
  • goncha
    ( adj ) Grouchy. Why are you acting so goncha today?
    1990s
  • gone
    ( adj ) Knowledgeable about the current scene. He's a real gone cat.
    1940s
  • gone
    ( adj ) Totally carried away with. I think Martha's complete gone over him.
    1950s
  • goober
    ( n ) A peanut. He sat there all night eating boiled goobers.
    1830s
  • goober
    ( n ) An unsophisticated person, a country bumpkin. Look at that goober in those velvet pants.
    1980s
  • goof
    ( n ) A mistake, error. Making a pass at the boss's wife was a major goof.
    1950s
  • goof
    ( v ) Loaf, waste time. They used to goof on their way home from work.
    1930s
  • goof
    ( n ) Someone stupid or foolish. I am really a goof at times.
    1910s
  • goof
    ( v ) To make a mistake, error. If I called you 'Clarissa', I just goofed.
    1940s
  • goof off
    ( v ) Loaf, waste time. I am really a goof at times.
    1950s
  • goof-off
    ( n ) A loiterer, someone who wastes time. This company can no longer afford good-offs.
    1940s
  • goofy
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. He gone goofy over Alice.
    1920s
  • goon
    ( n ) A stupid thug or bodyguard. The mob boss was accompanied by a couple of his goons.
    1930s
  • goon
    ( v ) To fall or trip. I gooned on the library steps and broke my heel.
    1980s
  • goop
    ( n ) A stupid person. He is such a goop he eats his peas with his fingers.
    1900s
  • goop
    ( n ) A sloppy, viscous, soft substance. The ice cream had melted into a bowl of goop.
    1990s
  • goopy
    ( adj ) Sloppy, viscous, soft. The ice cream had begun to melt and had become all goopy.
    1990s
  • goopy
    ( adj ) Stupid or foolish. Don't be so goopy; go along with the others.
    1900s
  • goose
    ( n ) A poke between the buttocks. Somebody gave the rat fink a goose in the hall and he jumped so high he fell.
    1950s
  • goose
    ( v ) To poke someone between the buttocks. She goosed Freddy in class and he jumped halfway across the room.
    1950s
  • goose
    ( v ) To speed up, accelerate. Hey, they're catching up. Goose it!
    1950s
  • gorilla
    ( n ) A stupid thug or bodyguard. The mob boss came in with one of his gorillas on either side.
    1940s
  • gosh
    ( int ) An exclamation of surprise. Gosh, I didn't know that.
    1750s
  • got the dragon
    ( vp ) To have bad breath. Wait until I brush my teeth; I woke up with the dragon.
    1990s
  • gouge
    ( v ) To cheat by overcharging. He was gouging his customers on a regular basis until they caught on.
    1870s
  • gourd
    ( n ) Head. Use your gourd to figure out what is happening.
    1840s
  • grain
    ( n ) Money. Hey Mom, hook me up with some grain.
    1990s
  • grand
    ( n ) A thousand dollars. His salary is twenty grand a month.
    1920s
  • grass
    ( n ) Marijuana. Stay away from Booger's grass, man; it's bad news.
    1960s
  • gravy
    ( n ) Easy money. This job is pure gravy.
    1940s
  • gravy train
    ( np ) A source of easy money. Boy, I wish I were a computer geek and could ride that gravy train.
    1920s
  • grease
    ( v ) To bribe. Apparently, someone greased the guard and got the combination to the safe.
    1970s
  • grease
    ( v ) To kill. If that squeeler lets the cat out of the bag, I'll grease him!
    1950s
  • grease
    ( v ) To bribe. I can grease a few palms in city hall to fix the parking ticket.
    1520s
  • grease
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. May O'Naise is such a grease!
    2000s
  • grease-ball
    ( n ) (Offensive) A dark haired, olive skinned man. Melodie! Why do you go out with that grease-ball?
    1980s
  • grease-monkey
    ( n ) (Offensive) An automobile mechanic. Do you want be a grease-monkey all your life
    1920s
  • greaser
    ( n ) A guy that used too much oil on his hair. Tony is greaser that everyone loves.
    1960s
  • greaser
    ( n ) (Offensive) A dark-haired, olive-skinned person. Who was that greaser I saw you with yesterday?
    1840s
  • great gun
    ( np ) Important person. Several of the city's great guns were at the party.
    1810s
  • green
    ( adj ) New, inexperienced. He is just a green rookie.
    1540s
  • green
    ( adj ) Ecologically responsible. Management thinks our company is green because we use paper cups in the office.
    2000s
  • greenback
    ( n ) A dollar. He opened his wallet and I saw a thick bundle of greenbacks in it.
    1940s
  • grifa
    ( n ) Marijuana. I stay away from grifa raised in the states, man.
    1980s
  • grift
    ( v ) To run a con. I don't have any cash so we'll have to grift tonight.
    1910s
  • grifter
    ( n ) A con artist. John is such a grifter he runs cons on his mother.
    1910s
  • grill
    ( n ) Face. Check out her new grill.
    1990s
  • grill
    ( v ) Show your teeth. Don't look so sad, girl, show me some grill.
    1980s
  • grill
    ( v ) To interrogate intensely. The police picked him up and grilled him for an hour.
    1940s
  • grind
    ( n ) A studious, unsociable person. Flynn isn't coming; that grind has to do his homework.
    1890s
  • grind
    ( n ) A boring, repetitive routine. I need a break from the daily grind.
    1850s
  • grind
    ( n ) A sex act. So, you had a bit of a grind with him, did you?
    1890s
  • grip
    ( n ) A lot of money. Wow! That new game costs a grip and a half!
    2000s
  • grip
    ( n ) Money. I can't go to the beach this weekend; I don't have the grip.
    1990s
  • grody
    ( adj ) Dirty, grimy. Don't put those jeans on; they're all grody from fixing the drain pipe.
    1970s
  • grogan
    ( n ) Defecation. Where's the can? I have a grogan coming on.
    1990s
  • groove
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. The music those cats play is all groove.
    1970s
  • groove
    ( n ) A situation in which you feel comfortable, competent. I just can do this, man; I'm not in my groove.
    1930s
  • groovy
    ( adj ) Very cool. You got a new car? Groovy!
    1960s
  • gross
    ( adj ) Disgusting. Oh, gross! You aren't going to eat that fish with the head on it, are you?
    1970s
  • gross-out
    ( v ) To disgust. The party was a gross-out.
    1970s
  • groupy
    ( n ) Someone who follows a famous person or group. Estelle was a groupy following 'Mogen David and the Grapes of Wrath' for 5 years.
    1960s
  • groupy
    ( n ) Someone who follows a famous person or group. I don't care about music; I just want to be in a band famous enough to attract groupies.
    1960s
  • grouser
    ( n ) A complainer, a whiner. Doolittle is a constant grouser that everybody hates.
    1900s
  • grub
    ( n ) Food. Where is the best place to get some grub around here?
    1650s
  • grub
    ( v ) To hug and kiss. They were grubbing in his car when her parents came home.
    1980s
  • grub
    ( n ) A studious, unsociable person. Well, it is the grubs who end up running the world.
    1840s
  • grubby
    ( adj ) Dirty, grimy. Those clothes are too grubby to wear to the party.
    1840s
  • grungy
    ( adj ) Dirty, grimy. That is a really grungy jacket.
    1960s
  • guff
    ( n ) Bluster, threats. Do what you want to do; don't take any guff from Frankie.
    1880s
  • gumshoe
    ( n ) A private investigator. Sally hired a low-life gumshoe to tail her husband.
    1940s
  • gumshoe
    ( n ) Detective. Some gumshoe has been tailing me all afternoon.
    1860s
  • gun
    ( v ) To accelerate something suddenly. When Pedro saw Maria down the road, he gunned his old jalopy.
    1930s
  • gunsel
    ( n ) A stupid thug or bodyguard who carries a gun. You never see Robin Banks without a couple of gunsels with him.
    1940s
  • gussy
    ( v ) To dress up. Well, look at Maud Lynn Dresser! Isn't she all gussied up?
    1910s
  • gut
    ( adj ) Easy, simple. She only takes gut courses.
    1980s
  • guts
    ( n ) Courage. It takes a lot of guts to give the boss your true opinion.
    1930s
  • guy
    ( n ) A fellow. That guy's been in a lot of trouble, (bloke).
    1920s
  • gyalist
    ( n ) A woman-chaser. I'm not a womanizer I'm just a gyalist.
    1990s
  • gyp
    ( v ) To swindle or cheat. He gypped me out of five dollars.
    1880s

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