Word Frequency Lists Translation Services Word Databases
Alphadictionary.com

Our Sponsors

Technical Translation
Denver Colorado ArchitectWebsite TranslationClip Art
 

Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

Search For:

(Optional)
(Optional)
Clean Full
Or, browse by letter:

ABCDEFGH I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

201 Results in H (You are getting Clean results. Get Full Results for "H")

  • hack
    ( v ) To disgust, make angry. If you mess with my girl, you'll just hack me, Mack.
    1990s
  • hack
    ( v ) To make fun of. Why are you always hacking on me?
    1980s
  • hail-Mary
    ( n ) (Football) A desperation play, such as an extremely long pass. It all came down to a hail-Mary pass in the final 5 seconds of the game.
    1970s
  • hairy
    ( adj ) Dangerous, threatening. That was a hairy plane trip. I am glad the storm is over.
    1960s
  • hairy
    ( adj ) Crude, clumsy. Franklin made a hairy gesture and skiddooed.
    1920s
  • hairy
    ( adj ) Old, out-dated. I'm tired of listening to his hairy jokes that went out in the 20s.
    1940s
  • hammer
    ( n ) Accelerator. Put the hammer to the floor or we will be late for the wedding.
    1960s
  • hammer
    ( v ) To drink heavily. Put the hammer to the floor or we will be late for the wedding.
    1970s
  • hammered
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. I was totally hammered at that party last night.
    1970s
  • handcuff
    ( n ) An engagement ring. I love the woman but she'll never get the handcuff on me.
    1920s
  • hang
    ( v ) To spend time with. I'm going down to the pizza parlor and hang with the gang.
    1980s
  • hang
    ( n ) Knack, understanding. Hang! I just can't get the hang of tying my shoes.
    1840s
  • hang five
    ( vp ) To put five toes over the nose of a surfboard. What a hotdogger! He always hangs five when people are watching.
    1960s
  • hang in
    ( v ) To persist, not give up. Sue can make it if she just hangs in for a few more days.
    1960s
  • hang it on
    ( vp ) Say, tell. I didn't hear you. Hang it on me again.
    1960s
  • hang loose
    ( vp ) To relax, take it easy. Hang loose when you go to the police station; don't go off the deep end.
    1960s
  • hang out
    ( v ) To relax, take it easy. Joey likes to hang out with the guys down at the pool hall.
    1960s
  • hang ten
    ( vp ) To put ten toes over the nose of the surfboard. That guy is always trying to hang ten on the low waves.
    1960s
  • hang tough
    ( vp ) Stick with, keep going, don't give up. We need to hang tough on our decision.
    1970s
  • hang up
    ( vp ) To quit. I have decided to hang up my teaching job.
    1940s
  • Hang!
    ( int ) Interjection of frustration or emphasis. Hang! I can eat six hotdogs in in 10 minutes.
    1940s
  • hang-out
    ( n ) A gathering place. The soda shop was our old hang-out.
    1890s
  • hang-up
    ( n ) A problem to deal with. I like people with no hang-ups.
    1960s
  • hanger-on
    ( n ) Someone who follows a famous person or group. Lionel arrived late to the party with a host of hangers-on in tow.
    1550s
  • hanger-on
    ( n ) Someone who accompanies a famous person. Lord Amersey and five or six of his hangers-on arrived late.
    1540s
  • hanging
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That is a hanging new sweater Brenda bought her sister.
    1900s
  • happening
    ( n ) An event. There's going to be a happening at Mr. Natural's house tonight.
    1960s
  • hard
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Those new kicks are so hard.
    1990s
  • hard-boiled
    ( adj ) Tough and cold. Harry's a hard-boiled cop who doesn't take anything from anybody.
    1920s
  • hardcore
    ( adj ) Authentic, genuine. He is a hardcore Trekky--never missed an episode.
    1960s
  • hardcore
    ( adj ) Harsh, extreme. What you just said to me was totally hardcore.
    1970s
  • hardware
    ( n ) A gun. The police were surprised by all the hardware the gang members had.
    1950s
  • hare-brain
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. Who was the hare-brain who put chewing gum on my seat?
    1550s
  • hare-brained
    ( adj ) Stupid or foolish. Whose hare-brained idea was it to spike granny's lemonade?
    1560s
  • has-been
    ( n ) Someone who is jaded or no longer effective in what he does. He once was a great actor but now he is just another washed-out has-been.
    1600s
  • has-been
    ( n ) Someone whose career has ended. Wiley Slider is a has-been who'll never play baseball again.
    1780s
  • hassle
    ( v ) To annoy, bother. Don't hassle me now; I'm busy.
    1960s
  • hassle
    ( v ) To fight. Look at those two guys arguing; they look like they are about to hassle.
    1980s
  • have a cow
    ( vp ) Throw a fit. I thought mama would have a cow when she saw the damage to the car.
    1950s
  • have a hissy
    ( vp ) Throw a fit. Mama had a hissy when she saw me in the tank top and miniskirt.
    1950s
  • have a shaft
    ( vp ) To find someone attractive. I have a shaft for that new girl.
    1990s
  • have arms
    ( vp ) To have a party. We got arms tonight!
    1990s
  • have it all together
    ( vp ) In good mental or psychological condition. Recently, I don't seem to have it all together.
    1960s
  • have legs
    ( vp ) Be workable. Your idea doesn't have legs; it won't fly.
    1950s
  • hawkshaw
    ( n ) Detective. Mildred hired some two-bit hawkshaw to follow me around and make sure I'm not seeing someone else.
    1900s
  • hayburner
    ( n ) A gas-guzzling car. He has a cool set of wheels but his dad drives a hayburner.
    1920s
  • hayburner
    ( n ) A horse that never wins a race. Don't talk to me; I just lost a week's salary on a hayburner at the track.
    1920s
  • hayseed
    ( n ) A clumsy, unsophisticated person from the country. That hayseed thinks a fox is some kind of forest animal.
    1850s
  • head
    ( n ) A person. Yo, there were some mad heads over at the six joint.
    1990s
  • head
    ( n ) Bathroom, toilet. Hold the game, boys, I have to go to the head.
    1950s
  • head honcho
    ( np ) The person in charge, the boss. Who is the head honcho of this company?
    1970s
  • heap
    ( n ) An old, beat-up car. That old heap of his couldn't make it to the beach.
    1950s
  • heat
    ( n ) A gun. Watch out for John, he's strapped with heat.
    1920s
  • heat
    ( n ) The police. Keep a look out for the heat.
    1970s
  • heater
    ( n ) A gun. The mobster had a lump in his coat that suggested a heater.
    1920s
  • heave
    ( v ) To vomit. Nadine heaved her whole dinner under the table.
    1600s
  • heave-ho
    ( n ) An ejection, throwing out physically. Frothingschloss became so rambunctious in the bar that they gave him the old heave-ho.
    1940s
  • heavy
    ( adj ) Carrying a gun. If you are heavy, you can't come in.
    1990s
  • heavy
    ( adj ) Serious, profound. I'm really not into heavy rap sessions.
    1960s
  • heazy
    ( pp ) The current location. I don't see Marvin but he is in the heazy.
    2000s
  • hecka
    ( adv ) Very. That's a hecka good-looking bicycle you have there, Otis.
    1980s
  • hector
    ( int ) An interjection of disgust. Oh, hector! I left my report card at school.
    1990s
  • heebie-jeebies
    ( n ) Nervousness. Just thinking about the dentist gives me the heebie-jeebies.
    1920s
  • heel
    ( n ) A loser, a jerk. What a heel! He left is wife and kids for the circus.
    1910s
  • heinz
    ( n ) A dog of mixed breed. Spot isn't a purebred; he's just a heinz.
    1960s
  • heist
    ( n ) An armed robbery. There was a heist at the bank today.
    1920s
  • hella
    ( adv ) Very. That movie was hella cool.
    1980s
  • Hello?
    ( int ) An interjection of surprise that the speaker is so stupid. Who is buried in Grant's tomb? Hello?.
    1980s
  • hep
    ( adj ) A part of the current musical culture. That cat is hep to all the dives with cool jazz.
    1900s
  • hep cat
    ( np ) A cool jazz-lover. Nathan is the hep cat who took me to Birdland for the first time.
    1930s
  • hero
    ( n ) Strong man, show off. That hero tried to lift 200 pounds.
    1990s
  • hick
    ( n ) A clumsy, unsophisticated person from the country. Patsy is dating some hick who wears a straw hat.
    1920s
  • hickey
    ( n ) Bruise on the skin left by sucking. They must have at least petted last night; she cam to work today with a hickey on her neck.
    1950s
  • high
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated on drugs. He was expelled for getting high.
    1960s
  • high
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. I was so high I could only count 9 fingers on my hands.
    1960s
  • high-five
    ( n ) HIV. Homer got the high-five from some skank down the block.
    1990s
  • high-five
    ( n ) Slapping someone else's palm stretched over the head. They gave each other a high-five after winning the sack race.
    1980s
  • high-five
    ( v ) To slap someone else's palm stretched over the head. Jan and Jo-Jo high-fived each other when they won the sack race.
    1980s
  • high-hat
    ( v ) To snub someone. When I asked her out, she high-hatted me and walked away.
    1920s
  • high-strung
    ( adj ) Tense, nervous. Amanda Lynn has been a little high-strung since her instrument cracked when she left it in the car.
    1860s
  • highside
    ( v ) To show off. Thomas was just highsiding when he said he was getting a new car.
    1990s
  • highsider
    ( n ) A show-off. Thomas is a complete highsider.
    1990s
  • hillbilly
    ( n ) A clumsy, unsophisticated person from the country. Willy Earl tells everyone he is in computing but he is just a hillbilly who works in the stockroom of a computer warehouse.
    1900s
  • hinky
    ( adj ) Nervous. Riding so fast in a car driven by a knucklehead left Clara a little hinky.
    1950s
  • hinky
    ( adj ) Questionable, suspicious; unreliable, out of whack. The car got hinky and Chad had to put in a new radiator.
    1960s
  • hip
    ( adj ) Knowledgeable about the current scene (variant of 'hep'). Don't worry, Nelson is hip to all that's going on these days.
    1960s
  • hip-shooter
    ( n ) Always talking without thinking. He is such a hip-shooter his foot spends more time in his mouth than in its shoe.
    1960s
  • hippie
    ( n ) A member of the counterculture of the 60s. Stacy Olde is an old hippie who never grew up.
    1960s
  • hipster
    ( n ) A member of the counterculture of the 40s (Origin of 'hippie'). He was a cool hipster you saw in all the jazz joints back in the 40s.
    1940s
  • hissy
    ( n ) A fit. She threw a hissy when she saw him with another girl.
    1950s
  • history
    ( adj ) Over, done with. I don't have any idea where my old boyfriend is. He's history.
    1930s
  • hit
    ( n ) A murder. The mob made another hit last night.
    1960s
  • hit
    ( n ) A paid assassination. The mob ordered hits on the heads of the opposing gang.
    1970s
  • hit
    ( n ) A successful event. Your proposal was a hit with the boss.
    1810s
  • hit
    ( v ) To kill. He was hit by the mob for blabbing.
    1970s
  • hit man
    ( n ) A hired killer. Olga hired a hit man to off her husband but her contact turned out to be a police officer.
    1950s
  • hit me on the hip
    ( vp ) Page me. If I'm not at home when you call, hit me on the hip. OK?
    1990s
  • hit on all sixes
    ( vp ) To perform perfectly. We lost last night because our star player was not hitting on all sixes.
    1920s
  • hit the books
    ( vp ) To study. Cut the gabbing; it's time to hit the books.
    1950s
  • hit the road
    ( vp ) To leave. Man, it's 11 o'clock; time for us to hit the road.
    1920s
  • hit the sack
    ( vp ) Go to bed. Is it 11 o'clock already? Time for me to hit the sack.
    1950s
  • hitch
    ( v ) To marry. Did you hear? Buffy and Lance got hitched last night.
    1940s
  • hock
    ( v ) (1) Being pawned. (2) Debt. Hardy Spender went into hock to buy that new car of his.
    1860s
  • hock
    ( v ) To pawn. Billy hocked his guitar to get his watch out of hock.
    1900s
  • hodad
    ( n ) A non-surfer. Look at him hotdogging for the hodads on the beach.
    1960s
  • hold
    ( vp ) Borrow. Let me hold 5 bucks; you know I will pay you back.
    1940s
  • hold on
    ( v ) Wait a minute. Don't go now; hold on a second.
    1840s
  • hold up
    ( v ) To rob. He ended up in the hoosegow for holding up a stage coach.
    1880s
  • Hold your horses!
    ( np ) Wait a minute. Hold your horses! We have plenty of time.
    1840s
  • hole up
    ( v ) Hide. I had to hole up for three days because the police were looking for me.
    1870s
  • holla
    ( v ) Call on the telephone Give me your digits and I'll holla back when I get home.
    2000s
  • holler
    ( v ) To talk to. That chickenhead was trying to holler at my man.
    1990s
  • Holy mackerel!
    ( int ) An interjection of surprise. Holy mackerel! We won the lottery!
    1940s
  • Holy moly!
    ( int ) An interjection of surprise. Holy moly! I just won the jackpot!
    1950s
  • home skillet
    ( n ) A close friend. Harry's my home skillet.
    1990s
  • home slice
    ( n ) A close friend. Ben's my home slice.
    1990s
  • homey
    ( n ) A neighborhood friend or acquaintance. All the homeys were waiting for me when I got home from school.
    1980s
  • honcho
    ( n ) An important person. The honcho says that we are going to have to give up two days of our vacation.
    1990s
  • honcho
    ( n ) The boss, commanding officer. Who is the head honcho around here?
    1940s
  • honey
    ( n ) An attractive female. There were a lot of honeys at the bar last night.
    1940s
  • honk around
    ( v ) To spend time with talking. We're going over to my crib and honk around.
    1990s
  • honkin
    ( adj ) Very, extremely. Lance Sterling has a honkin big condo in Scranton.
    2000s
  • hoo-ha
    ( n ) An uproar, commotion. Why all the hoo-ha over calling my secretary "Sweetie-pie"?
    1930s
  • hoo-ride
    ( n ) An excellent, outstanding car. Check out my partner in his hoo-ride.
    1980s
  • hooch
    ( n ) Liquor, bootleg liquor. Where did you get this rotgut hooch?
    1890s
  • hooch up
    ( v ) To hug and kiss. I saw you and your cutie hooching it up in the car.
    1990s
  • hoochie
    ( n ) A promiscuous female. She's just a hoochie without a clue.
    1990s
  • hood
    ( n ) Juvenile delinquent. Those hoods stole our hubcaps.
    1990s
  • hood
    ( n ) The neighborhood or a certain side of tow. Meet me in the hood tonight.
    1980s
  • hood
    ( n ) A hoodlum, gangster. It is a nice neighborhood except for a couple of hoods who live down the block.
    1920s
  • hoodie
    ( n ) A hooded shirt or coat. It's cold; have you got an extra hoodie I can borrow.
    1990s
  • hoodrat
    ( n ) A female of ill repute in the neighborhood. I don't mess with that hoodrat; she's dangerous.
    1990s
  • hooey
    ( n ) Nonsense. All that stuff about inheriting a million dollars is just a lot of hooey.
    1920s
  • hoofer
    ( n ) A dancer. He's dating some hoofer at Radio City Hall.
    1920s
  • hook
    ( v ) To addict. They say Zelda is hooked on heroine.
    1920s
  • hook
    ( v ) To steal. He hooked a book on criminal justice and it turned his life around.
    1980s
  • hook
    ( n ) To get someone addicted to. I think Melvin is hooked on Gwendolyn; I saw her wearing his Yankees cap this morning.
    1920s
  • hook
    ( n ) The ordinary. Wow, Millie! Those new jeans are off the hook!
    2000s
  • hook up
    ( v ) To get together. After the party, she hooked up with Spongy and they went to a drive-in.
    1970s
  • hookey
    ( n ) Truancy. Maynard played hookey from school today and missed the quiz.
    1840s
  • hooky
    ( n ) Truancy. Maynard played hooky from school today and missed the quiz.
    1840s
  • hoops
    ( n ) Basketball. Hey, man, let's go shoot some hoops after school.
    1980s
  • hoopty
    ( n ) An old, beat-up car. That old hoopty of Jules can't make it home.
    1980s
  • Hoopty-doo!
    ( int ) An interjection of celebration. Hoopty-doo! Fred got a promotion and a big raise!
    1920s
  • Hoopty-doo!
    ( int ) An interjection of dismissal (sarcastic). You got a dollar tip? Well, hoopty-doo!.
    1960s
  • Hooray!
    ( int ) An interjection of celebration. Hooray! I just won the lottery!
    1890s
  • hoosegow
    ( n ) Jail or prison. You had better be careful that you don't end up in the hoosegow.
    1910s
  • hoot
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. Wasn't that party last night a hoot, though?
    1970s
  • hooyah
    ( int ) An interjection of confidence in oneself. Hooyah! I'm invincible!
    2000s
  • hooyah
    ( adj ) Self-confident. I have hooyah power!
    2000s
  • hop up
    ( v ) Increase the power and speed of a car. His wheels are faster since he hopped up the engine and installed dual glasspacks.
    1950s
  • hop-head
    ( n ) Someone high on drugs and restive. Some hop-head mugged me in the park.
    1960s
  • hopped up
    ( adj ) High on drugs and restive. Don't ever come in here again when you are hopped-up.
    1960s
  • hops
    ( n ) The ability to jump high. Look at that guy jump; he has hops.
    1990s
  • hork
    ( v ) To vomit. I drank so much, I horked on my shoes.
    1980s
  • hork
    ( v ) Gulp, gobble, swallow whole. Don't just hork it down; savor it!
    2000s
  • horn
    ( n ) Telephone. Lester will talk to you later; he's on the horn with Rochelle right now.
    1970s
  • horny
    ( adj ) Sexually aroused; randy. I haven't been horny since I started taking that antidepressant.
    1950s
  • horse
    ( n ) A large, strong man with a big appetite. Reilly is a horse; you had better fix him a big dinner.
    1950s
  • horse
    ( v ) To play with carelessly. I don't have time to horse around; let's get down to business.
    1920s
  • horse feathers
    ( int ) Nonsense. Horse feathers! You never dated Clara Bow!
    1920s
  • hose
    ( v ) To harm greatly. If my parents find out about this, I'm hosed.
    1970s
  • hosed
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. I got really hosed last night at the party.
    1960s
  • hot
    ( adj ) Sexy, attractive. That girl is hot!
    1950s
  • hot
    ( adj ) Stolen. The police stopped them because they thought the car was hot.
    1930s
  • hot
    ( adj ) Fast (music). I like my jazz hot, not cool.
    1920s
  • hot
    ( adj ) Angry, mad. Dudley is a bit hot under the collar from your insult.
    1220s
  • hot
    ( adj ) Electrically charged or radioactive. He accidentally picked up a hot wire and got a shock.
    1920s
  • hot
    ( adj ) Electrically charged or radioactive. He accidentally picked up a hot wire and got a shock
    1920s
  • hot and bothered
    ( ap ) Irritated. Don't get all hot and bothered about a parking ticket.
    1950s
  • Hot diggity dog!
    ( int ) An interjection of surprise. Hot diggity dog! Bonzo brought home the Marilyn Monroe movie.
    1940s
  • Hot dog!
    ( int ) An interjection of surprise. Hot dog! I got second base on the baseball team.
    1940s
  • hot minute
    ( np ) Fast or quick. I'll be with you in a hot minute.
    1990s
  • hot potato
    ( np ) Something potentially exposive, dangerous. The assistant district attorney was given all the hot potatoes that no one else woud touch with a ten-foot pole.
    1840s
  • hot seat
    ( np ) The electric chair. Marcus got the hot seat for murder.
    1920s
  • hot seat
    ( np ) A critical position with great pressure for success. Dwayne is in the hot seat now: if he doesn't make his quota, he is history.
    1930s
  • hot to trot
    ( ap ) Sexy, seductive (a female). Selma seemed hot to trot last night.
    1950s
  • hotdog
    ( v ) To show off. Yeah, he's good at right field but he hotdogs too much.
    1960s
  • hotdogger
    ( n ) A show-off. Yeah, he's good at right field but he is too much of a hot-dogger.
    1960s
  • hotfoot (it)
    ( v ) Move quickly. When Mel heard Lance was visiting his Mel's girlfriend, he hotfooted it over to her place.
    1890s
  • hothead
    ( n ) Easily angered person. Reba is such a hothead she flew off the handle when I told her she was gaining weight.
    1660s
  • hotrod
    ( n ) A souped-up car. Oliver's been working on that old hotrod of his for two years, now.
    1940s
  • hots
    ( n ) Strong desire for a person of the opposite sex. Wendy told me that Fran Tastik has the hots for Gordon Lowe.
    1940s
  • hotshot
    ( adj ) Expert. Malcolm, they say, is a hotshot reporter for a big newspaper up north.
    1940s
  • hotshot
    ( n ) A person who thinks he is very important. Look at Bud with his collar up; he thinks he is such a hotshot.
    1930s
  • hotsy-totsy
    ( adj ) Seemingly excellent, outstanding. He thinks that just because he drives some hotsy-totsy Stutz Bearcar, he's the cat's meow.
    1920s
  • hottie
    ( n ) An attractive female. She is a hottie but they say she is a hoodrat, so I avoid her.
    2000s
  • huffy
    ( adj ) Arrogant, rude. I will do it soon so please don't get huffy.
    1680s
  • humbug
    ( n ) Nonsense. Everything she says is just a lot of humbug.
    1750s
  • humdinger
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. That new baseball bat of Glen Gary's is a humdinger!
    1900s
  • humongous
    ( adj ) Really huge. If she could get over her humongous ego, she could be a groovy chick.
    1970s
  • hunk
    ( n ) A well-built man. Say, Serafima, who is that hunk you are talking to?
    1970s
  • hunky-dory
    ( adj ) OK, alright. Is everything here hunky-dory?
    1860s
  • hustle
    ( v ) Hurry. If you don't hustle, we will be late again.
    1810s
  • hustle
    ( v ) To swindle or cheat. If he wants you to pay cash for the car, he is just hustling you.
    1960s
  • hype
    ( n ) Exaggerated advertising. Don't believe the hype about Rhonda; she isn't all she is cracked up to be.
    1960s
  • hype
    ( n ) Hypodermic needle. If you aren't on drugs, why are all these hypes in your room?
    1920s
  • hype
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Joe got a new drum kit; it's really hype.
    1990s
  • hype
    ( v ) To build interest using exaggerated advertising (from 'hyperbole'). Lotta Bolloni isn't such a good actress but her films are hyped so she is popular.
    1960s
  • hype
    ( v ) To swindle by overcharging or short-changing. I think they hyped me back there at the store.
    1920s
  • hyper
    ( adj ) Overexcited (from 'hyperactive'). Don't get hyper about what she told you. You know it isn't true.
    1970s

Do you like our Slang Dictionary?

You will probably like these other features of our website.