Word Frequency Lists Translation Services Word Databases
Alphadictionary.com

Our Sponsors

Technical Translation
Denver Colorado ArchitectWebsite TranslationClip Art
 

Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

Search For:

(Optional)
(Optional)
Clean Full
Or, browse by letter:

ABCDEFGH I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

71 Results in J (You are getting Full results. Get Clean Results for "J")

  • J-Crew clone
    ( np ) Fraternity brother. Don't go in that bar; it's full of J-Crew clones.
    1980s
  • jack
    ( v ) To steal. Somebody
    1990s
  • jack
    ( n ) Money. He's a nice-looking guy but he doesn't have enough jack for me.
    1920s
  • jack up
    ( adj ) Raise a car's rear end. Hey, man, your rod looks cool jacked up like that.
    1970s
  • jacketed
    ( adj ) Dating only one person. Forget her; she's jacketed.
    1990s
  • jail bait
    ( np ) A girl too young for sexual advances. Don't hit on her; she's only 15 and jail bait.
    1950s
  • jake
    ( adj ) Alright, OK. Who made all that noise? Is everything jake out here?
    1910s
  • jalopy
    ( n ) An old, beat-up car. Where did you get that old jalopy?
    1920s
  • jam
    ( v ) To leave. The music's getting too loud; I'm jamming.
    1980s
  • jam
    ( v ) To make music informally. After the gig last night, the group went over to Tooter's and jammed the rest of the night.
    1950s
  • jam on the one
    ( vp ) To be excellent, outstanding. That song she's singing is jamming on the one.
    1990s
  • jammed
    ( adj ) Upset, angry. I was totally jammed over that D in bio.
    1990s
  • jane
    ( n ) Any female. He picked up some jane at the bar last night.
    1920s
  • janked up
    ( adj ) Confused, messed up. Everything was so janked up we didn't know if we were coming or going.
    1990s
  • jankety
    ( adj ) In bad condition. I always wear jankety kicks so nobody wants to steal them.
    1990s
  • janky
    ( adj ) In bad condition, ugly. Rodriquez, we aren't riding in your anky old car any more.
    1990s
  • janky
    ( adj ) Suspicious, not quite honest. That girl in the trench coat and dark glasses looks janky.
    1990s
  • java
    ( n ) Coffee. Give me a cup of java and one of your week-old doughnuts.
    1920s
  • jazz
    ( v ) To enhance, make more decorative. He
    1920s
  • jazz
    ( adj ) To excite, enthuse. This is going to be a great reunion. I'm really jazzed about going.
    1910s
  • jazzed
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. Get him out of here; he's totally jazzed.
    1920s
  • jelly roll
    ( np ) Men's hair style combed up and forward on both sides to a point in the middle of the forehead. Floyd looks like a jerk in that jelly roll of his.
    1960s
  • jerk
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. The jerk left his date at the party.
    1940s
  • jerk
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. The jerk kept hitting on my girl while I was in Iraq.
    1930s
  • jerk around
    ( v ) Mislead. Recently it seems like everyone is jerking me around.
    1950s
  • Jesus freak
    ( np ) Missionary Christians. There's a bunch of Jesus freaks in my philosophy class.
    1970s
  • jet
    ( v ) To leave. I have homework to do; let's jet.
    1990s
  • jets
    ( n ) Smarts, brains. She is good-looking but she doesn't have much jets.
    1990s
  • jewels
    ( n ) An excellent pair of shoes. Hey man, where did you come across those awesome jewels?
    1990s
  • jiggy
    ( adj ) Jittery, fidgety. Sit still and don't be so jiggy.
    1890s
  • jiggy
    ( adj ) Sexy, attractive. She is a jiggy woman, the way she dresses.
    1990s
  • jimmies
    ( n ) Stretch shorts worn under another pair of shorts. Did you remember to wear your jimmies?
    1990s
  • jinx
    ( n ) Something or someone that brings bad luck. For a long time sailors thought that a woman on board ship was a jinx.
    1910s
  • jit
    ( n ) An inexperienced person. We got a bunch of jits on the team.
    1990s
  • jitney
    ( n ) A nickel, a 5-cent piece. He didn't have a jitney on him at the time.
    1900s
  • jitterbug
    ( n ) A nervous person. Calm down, Donny, don't be such a jitterbug.
    1930s
  • jitterbug
    ( n ) A dance to fast big band jazz. Boogie-woogie, bebop, jitterbug, I love all the fast dances.
    1940s
  • jive
    ( n ) Fast jazz of the 20s-30s. I know a little club where they play jive until 2 in the morning.
    1920s
  • jive
    ( v ) To make sense, fit. Nothing you say jives with what your wife told me.
    1940s
  • jive
    ( v ) To mislead, deceive. Don't try to jive me, man. I know what's what.
    1920s
  • jive
    ( v ) To play fast jazz of the 20s-30s. He had a group that would jive all night.
    1920s
  • jive
    ( n ) Worthless, crazy, or unpleasant talk. Don't talk that jive to me, turkey; I don't believe a word you say.
    1920s
  • jock
    ( n ) An athlete. He likes to hang out at jock bars and talk sports all the time.
    1950s
  • jock
    ( v ) To flirt. I think that guy is trying to jock you?
    1990s
  • Joe
    ( n ) Form of address to an unknown male. Hey Joe, what's up.
    1840s
  • joe
    ( n ) Coffee. Give me a cup of joe, Joe, and a piece of Mabel's crabapple pie or whatever it is.
    1920s
  • Joe Blow
    ( np ) An ordinary, average person. Joe Blow doesn't buy many yachts in his lifetime.
    1950s
  • Joe Sixpack
    ( np ) An ordinary, average person. No, you wouldn't expect Joe Sixpack to drive around in a Bugatti.
    1970s
  • john
    ( n ) Bathroom. The john really smells.
    1950s
  • john
    ( n ) A toilet or the toilet. When he flushed the john, he was surprised to see his cap disappearing down the hole.
    1920s
  • John Law
    ( n ) The police. Watch out for John Law.
    1950s
  • johnson
    ( n ) The male organ. [Use your imagination].
    1940s
  • joint
    ( n ) A marijuana cigarette. He is good at rolling joints.
    1960s
  • joint
    ( n ) An opium den. Where is the closest joint to here.
    1850s
  • joint
    ( n ) Jail or prison. He claims that he did time in the joint.
    1950s
  • joint
    ( n ) A prison, jail. When he got out of the joint, he went legit.
    1940s
  • joint
    ( n ) A questionable establishment. He took her to a joint he wouldn't want his mother to even know about.
    1910s
  • jone
    ( v ) To criticize. He was joning me all night.
    1990s
  • juice
    ( n ) Liquor or other alcoholic beverage. I hear Harry is on the juice again.
    1820s
  • juice
    ( n ) Electricity. There is a plug here but it doesn't have any juice.
    1890s
  • juice
    ( n ) Influence. Marty has enough juice in city hall that he never pays a parking ticket.
    1960s
  • juice
    ( n ) Electricity. Plug the mixer in and give it the juice.
    1890s
  • juice joint
    ( n ) A speakeasy. For five years Myrtle ran a juice-joint until they caught her for selling bootleg hootch.
    1920s
  • juiced
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. Orville got pretty juiced at the party last night.
    1950s
  • juiced
    ( adj ) Overexcited. Man, I was hella juiced at summer jams.
    1990s
  • Jump in the lake!
    ( phr ) Don't bother me; you're crazy. You want me to loan you $5? Go jump in the lake!
    1920s
  • jump the couch
    ( vp ) To lose control of yourself, go crazy. Maureen jumped the couch when she heard that Craig had left town with Sue.
    2000s
  • junkie
    ( n ) Drug addict. She works at the hospital helping junkies kick the habit.
    1920s
  • just off the boat
    ( pp ) Naive. He acts like he is just off the boat.
    1900s
  • juvie
    ( n ) Juvenile court or detention center. Then they hauled me into juvey.
    1960s
  • juvie
    ( n ) Juvenile delinquent. Those juvies are always stealing things.
    1940s

Do you like our Slang Dictionary?

You will probably like these other features of our website.