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Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

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53 Results in K (You are getting Full results. Get Clean Results for "K")

  • ka-ching
    ( n ) Much money (the sound of an old-fashioned cash register). I can hear the ka-ching my book is going to bring in now.
    1970s
  • ka-ching
    ( n ) Much money (the sound of an old-fashioned cash register). I can hear the ka-ching my book is going to bring in now.
    1970s
  • keen
    ( adj ) Wanting to, excited about {British}. I'm keen to go to the motion pictures.
    1930s
  • keen
    ( adj ) Attractive or appealing. She was a keen girl, with nice gams and figure.
    1910s
  • keen-o
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That is a totally keen-o hairdo.
    1990s
  • keep your cool
    ( vp ) Remain calm. He kept his cool when his house burned down.
    1960s
  • kegger
    ( n ) A beer party. I hear there is a five-kegger at John's house tonight.
    1980s
  • keister
    ( n ) The buttocks. Llewelyn slipped on the wet floor and fell on his keister.
    1930s
  • key
    ( adj ) Important, crucial. That scarf is key for that outfit.
    1960s
  • kibosh
    ( n ) A stop (to something). The rents put the kibosh on the party Saturday night.
    1940s
  • kick
    ( n ) Enjoyment. I get a kick out of watching him paint.
    1940s
  • kick it
    ( v ) To leave. Well, I have to write a paper tonight so I better be kicking it.
    1990s
  • kick it
    ( v ) To spend time with talking. I found Bryan just kicking it with his friends.
    1990s
  • kick out
    ( v ) To dismiss or expel. He was kicked out of office for malfeasance.
    1690s
  • kick the habit
    ( vp ) To end an addiction. If you don't kick the ice cream habit you're going to buy the farm.
    1950s
  • kick-off
    ( n ) The beginning. The kick-off of his political campaign is tonight.
    1850s
  • kickass
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That new bar is kick-ass.
    1980s
  • kicker
    ( n ) A sudden twist or pitfall. Fritz loaned me the 5 bucks I needed but the kicker is, he wants me to pay him interest.
    1970s
  • kicker
    ( n ) A sudden twist or pitfall. Fritz loaned me the 5 bucks I needed but the kicker is, he wants me to pay him interest.
    1970s
  • kicking
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That band was kicking!
    1990s
  • kicks
    ( n ) Fun. She gets her kicks by going to the beach.
    1940s
  • kicks
    ( n ) Shoes. Those are some really cool kicks!
    1990s
  • kid
    ( int ) A young person. Hey kid, where are you going?
    1690s
  • kid
    ( n ) Child, young person. She was married and had 5 kids.
    1590s
  • kill
    ( v ) To really impress. His jokes just killed them.
    1630s
  • kill
    ( v ) To turn off, switch off. Kill the lights and let's look at the Christmas tree in the dark.
    1880s
  • kill
    ( v ) Waste (time). I killed two hours in a movie today.
    1720s
  • killer
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Their company just released a killer application that he helped hack.
    1980s
  • killer
    ( n ) Something or someone excellent, outstanding. That new book by her mother is a real killer.
    1900s
  • killer
    ( n ) Tough, difficult. All of her courses are killers.
    1960s
  • killjoy
    ( n ) A squelcher. My parents are killjoys who don't want me to wear so many beads.
    1920s
  • king-size
    ( ap ) Really huge. That Caddy his dad has is king size.
    1940s
  • kipe
    ( v ) To steal. I think Brady kiped that cap he's wearing.
    1990s
  • kiss up to
    ( v ) To toady. Anna Belle's always kissing up to the teacher; no wonder she gets good grades.
    1970s
  • kisser
    ( n ) Mouth. Watch what you say, Bub, or I'll pop you one in the kisser.
    1920s
  • kite
    ( n ) Money. How much kite you got?
    1990s
  • klutz
    ( n ) A clumsy, awkward person. He is a real klutz.
    1960s
  • knock
    ( v ) Criticize, insult. Hey, don't knock my new hat!
    1950s
  • knock off
    ( v ) To copy. Boris can knock off a half dozen Picassos before lunch.
    1960s
  • knock off
    ( v ) To kill. Bugsy finked on the mob and they knocked him off.
    1940s
  • knock off
    ( v ) To quit. He knocked off work early today.
    1940s
  • knock out
    ( v ) To deeply impress. His report knocked them out.
    1590s
  • knock up
    ( v ) To get someone pregnant. He knocked up his girl friend and had to marry her.
    1810s
  • knock-off
    ( v ) An illegal copy. He was caught selling knock-offs of Picasso drawings.
    1960s
  • knocked out
    ( adj ) Asleep. Lem is knocked out; he worked all night long.
    1940s
  • knockout
    ( n ) A very beautiful female. Who was that knockout I saw you with last Friday?
    1890s
  • knockout
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. It was a knockout of a car; I couldn't pass it up.
    1960s
  • knuckle sandwich
    ( np ) A punch in the mouth. Shut up or I'll give you a knuckle sandwich.
    1940s
  • knucklehead
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. That knucklehead can't read his own name without moving his lips!
    1940s
  • kook
    ( n ) An eccentric, non-conformist. The kook thinks he's making a fashion statement wearing his shirt backwards.
    1950s
  • kooky
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. What happened to your kooky friend?
    1950s
  • kosher
    ( adj ) Fair. Well, the deal to trade your car for his motorcycle doesn't sound kosher to me.
    1920s
  • kryptonite
    ( n ) A weakness. Boy, that girl is my kryptonite.
    1980s

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