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Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

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69 Results in L (You are getting Clean results. Get Full Results for "L")

  • l's
    ( n ) Driver's license. Hey Alethia, did you get your l's yet?
    1990s
  • lackey
    ( adj ) Bad, lazy, worthless. Her attitude is so lackey.
    1990s
  • laid-back
    ( adj ) Calm and relaxed. You need to be more laid-back.
    1960s
  • lame
    ( adj ) Weak, inadequate. That is really a lame excuse.
    1960s
  • lame
    ( adj ) Bad, of poor quality. What a lame excuse!
    1950s
  • lame-brain
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. This lame-brain thinks it is the Umpire State Building in New York.
    1930s
  • lame-brained
    ( adj ) Stupid or foolish. I've never heard such a lame-brained idea in my life.
    1930s
  • later
    ( int ) Good-bye. Later, dude; I have to go.
    1960s
  • lay a patch
    ( vp ) To screech your tires pulling out. Hilda just left; I heard her lay a patch pulling out.
    1950s
  • lay a strip
    ( vp ) To screech your tires pulling out. Heidi just went home; I heard her lay a strip pulling out.
    1950s
  • lay off
    ( v ) To fire (temporarily). The company laid off 100 people this week.
    1910s
  • lay off
    ( v ) To quit. Hey, lay off bothering me!
    1900s
  • lay on
    ( v ) To tell. OK, lay the bad news on me; I'm ready.
    1950s
  • lay rubber
    ( vp ) To screech your tires pulling out. Let's get out of here; lay some rubber, man!
    1950s
  • lay some scratch
    ( vp ) To screech your tires pulling out. He lays some scratch every time he pulls away in that car of his.
    1980s
  • lead sled
    ( np ) A car with extensive body work. That lead sled of his can't drag for the weight.
    1960s
  • lean on
    ( v ) To apply pressure, threaten. Fritzy wouldn't pay Tommy Gunn the $100 he owed him, so Tommy brought a couple of his friends to lean on Fritzy a little.
    1950s
  • leave holding the bag
    ( vp ) To be made a scapegoat. When the hand grenade exploded beneath the cow, Beulah was left holding the bag.
    1860s
  • left
    ( adj ) Angry, mad. When Maria walked in and caught her parents reading her diary, she got left.
    1990s
  • legit
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That party last night was totally legit!
    1990s
  • Let her rip!
    ( vp ) Start it up, release it. OK, put her in gear and let her rip!
    1850s
  • Let it all hang out.
    ( phr ) To lose your inhibitions. We're going to have a party this weekend where you can let it all hang out.
    1960s
  • Let someone have it
    ( vp ) To shoot someone. If you don't stop grabbing for my gun, I'm going to let you have it.
    1940s
  • level
    ( n ) Honest, truthful. Level with me: did you really take Jeanette MacDonald out?
    1920s
  • libes
    ( n ) The library. He really gives off good vibes.
    1980s
  • lick
    ( n ) A bit, the smallest amount. He doesn't have lick of sense.
    1900s
  • lick
    ( n ) A criticism, insult. Lorraine took her share of licks in the papers as she made her way up to stardom.
    1970s
  • lick
    ( n ) A short musical improvisation. He isn't that creative a trumpeter; he gets most of his licks from others.
    1930s
  • lift
    ( v ) To steal. He was picked up for lifting hubcaps.
    1950s
  • lifted
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. Darlene got a little lifted on the rum and fell off the bench.
    1980s
  • light
    ( v ) To ignore. I was so lighted by my boyfriend yesterday.
    1990s
  • light out
    ( v ) Move quickly, leave suddenly. When Mel heard Lance was there, he lit out for Megan's place.
    1860s
  • lightweight
    ( n ) Someone who cannot get things done. You don't want to give a job this important to a lightweight.
    1930s
  • like
    ( int ) Speech punctuation. Hey, man, why are you, like, trying to, like, get me, like, to do something, like, I don't like.
    1960s
  • like crazy
    ( pp ) Really fast. We're studying like crazy for the exam tomorrow.
    1940s
  • line
    ( n ) An untrue story or statement. Cornelius shot me some line about being an Eskimo who wandered too far south.
    1940s
  • line
    ( n ) Flirtatious talk designed to pick up a date. He fed me this line about how many banks he owned which didn't work when I saw the jalopy he was driving.
    1920s
  • lingo
    ( n ) Speech, language dialect. Cherokee sure is a strange lingo.
    1660s
  • link card
    ( np ) Food stamps. Link cards are not accepted in this club.
    1980s
  • lit
    ( adj ) Angry, mad. I was fully lit after he dissed me like that.
    1990s
  • lit
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He came home lit and fell into bed like a rock.
    1920s
  • live
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That party was live last night!
    1990s
  • live wire
    ( n ) An exciting, energetic person. Isn't that Merrill Lynch a live wire? Did you see him wearing that lampshade like a hat at the party?
    1890s
  • live-park
    ( v ) To park with the motor running. Jump out. I'll live park while you get the sodas.
    1980s
  • live-wire
    ( np ) An exciting person. Maisy is a live-wire everyone wants at his or her party.
    1900s
  • loaded
    ( adj ) Drunk; intoxicated. He partied all night and came home loaded.
    1890s
  • loaded
    ( adj ) Rich, wealthy. I hear Leroy's parents are loaded.
    1900s
  • lock up
    ( v ) To fight. If you keep talking jive, we're going to lock up.
    1980s
  • lockup
    ( n ) Jail or prison. He was picked up on a DUI and spent the night in the lockup.
    1950s
  • lollapalooza
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. Boy, that storm last night was a real lollapalooza, wasn't it?
    1900s
  • loony
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane, lunatic. Mike Hunt is so loony he thinks Turkey is the capital of Greece.
    1870s
  • loony bin
    ( np ) Insane asylum. Loan you $5? You should be locked up in a loony bin!
    1910s
  • loopy
    ( adj ) Drunk; intoxicated. He partied all night and then came to the final loopy.
    1980s
  • loot
    ( n ) Money. Yo man, I don't have any loot; hook me up.
    1990s
  • loot
    ( n ) Stolen goods or money. The robbers were caught red-handed still holding the loot.
    1780s
  • lop
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. You are such a lop; can't you even park a car?
    1990s
  • loser
    ( n ) A person who cannot succeed. John is a loser who has never held a job for a year.
    1950s
  • louse
    ( n ) A mean, despicable person. I won't have anything to do with that louse Ivan Oder.
    1900s
  • love handles
    ( np ) Rolls of fat on the sides. I exercise every day, but I can't get rid of these love handles.
    1970s
  • low
    ( adj ) Secret, confidential. I'll tell you who she's seeing but you have to keep this low.
    1990s
  • low
    ( adj ) Sad, depressed. I just flunked chem and I'm feeling really low.
    1740s
  • low-key
    ( adj ) Relaxed, quiet, inconspicuous. I prefer a low-key approach to negotiations.
    1970s
  • low-keyed
    ( adj ) Relaxed, quiet, inconspicuous. I prefer a low-keyed approach to negotiations.
    1960s
  • lug
    ( n ) A thug; a dumb but nice guy. The big lug never forgets my birthday.
    1930s
  • lug
    ( n ) Coercion, pressure. He wouldn't pay until we put the lug on him.
    1920s
  • lulu
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. That shot he made outside the 3-point zone was a lulu!
    1940s
  • lunachick
    ( n ) A crazy female. She's such a lunachick she went postal when he took her parking place.
    1990s
  • lunch
    ( v ) To lose control of yourself, go crazy. She lunched when she found out she needed another math class.
    1990s
  • lush
    ( n ) An alcoholic. Ferdie's dad was a lush but he turned out alright.
    1890s

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