Word Frequency Lists Translation Services Word Databases
Alphadictionary.com

Our Sponsors

Technical Translation
Denver Colorado ArchitectWebsite TranslationClip Art
 

Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

Search For:

(Optional)
(Optional)
Clean Full
Or, browse by letter:

ABCDEFGH I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

83 Results in M (You are getting Clean results. Get Full Results for "M")

  • machine
    ( n ) A car (hot-rodders). You should see that boss machine of his.
    1900s
  • Mack
    ( int ) Form of address for a male. Hey, Mack, where is the nearest truck stop?
    1930s
  • mack (on)
    ( v ) To flirt with, try to seduce. That guy was macking on her, but she wasn't interested.
    1990s
  • mack (on)
    ( v ) To take advantage of. Yo. free pizza? I'm going to mack on some of that!
    1990s
  • mack-daddy
    ( n ) Someone good at flirting with women. You are the mackdaddy of them all; why don't you have a date for the prom?
    1990s
  • made in the shade
    ( vp ) Success guaranteed. Since Hoodad got that job, he has it made in the shade.
    1950s
  • mail
    ( n ) Money. I have to pick up a job so I can get some mail.
    2000s
  • make a pass
    ( vp ) To flirt with, try to seduce. He made a pass at me but I wasn't interested.
    1940s
  • make it
    ( v ) To leave. When are you going to make it?
    1990s
  • make no nevermind.
    ( vp ) To not matter. It makes no nevermind to me what she does.
    1950s
  • make out
    ( v ) To hug and kiss. Their parents caught them making out on the couch in the living room.
    1950s
  • make the scene
    ( vp ) To attend an event or activity. Hey, man, I'm going to be too busy to make the scene tonight.
    1960s
  • make tracks
    ( vp ) To leave. When are you going to make tracks?
    1950s
  • make waves
    ( vp ) Cause trouble. Try not to make waves around the office.
    1960s
  • make whoopee
    ( v ) To hug and kiss. They were making whoopee in his Model-T Ford.
    1920s
  • make-believe
    ( n, adj ) Pretence, imagination. You can't live your whole life in a make-believe world.
    1790s
  • malarkey
    ( n ) Nonsense. He said he aced the chem exam. What malarkey!
    1930s
  • mama's boy
    ( np ) A sissy who is overly attached to his mother. Ben Dover is such a mother's boy he won't go to the movies without calling home first.
    1860s
  • man
    ( n ) From of address to a male in the North. Hey, man, why are you doing that?
    1950s
  • Man!
    ( n ) An emphatic interjection. Man, that was a hard test!
    1950s
  • mao
    ( v ) Gulp, gobble, swallow whole. Wow, dude, you really maoed that pizza down!
    1990s
  • marinate
    ( v ) To relax, take it easy. I'm sitting around watching TV, just marinating in my own juices.
    1990s
  • mark
    ( np ) Likely victim or target. The Japanese are an easy mark for muggers because they carry cash.
    1550s
  • mash
    ( v ) To hug and kiss. I saw them mashing in the cafeteria.
    1990s
  • masher
    ( n ) A man who makes improper advances to women. Mike Hunt is a masher who doesn't develop lasting relationships with girls.
    1870s
  • masher
    ( n ) A young man who makes improper advances to women. Mike Harden is a masher always on the make.
    1870s
  • mass
    ( adv ) A lot. You're going to get in mass trouble!
    1990s
  • match
    ( v ) Set fire to, to commit arson. Morty Gusting matched his own house to get the insurance money.
    1970s
  • maul
    ( v ) To hug and kiss. I saw her mauling this other guy and her boyfriend has no idea.
    2000s
  • max out
    ( adj ) To go to the limit. I am maxed out at my work and need to rest.
    1980s
  • mean
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Rusty Carr's rod is the meanest car in town.
    1950s
  • meat
    ( n ) A male. That new freshman looks like mean meat.
    1980s
  • meatball
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. So then the meatball leans over and let's his cigarette drop into the open carburetor.
    1940s
  • meathook
    ( n ) A hand. Get your meathooks off me!
    1910s
  • meeper
    ( n ) A party. Are you going to the meeper tonight?
    1990s
  • mega
    ( adj ) Large. I have mega tomatoes in my garden this summer.
    1970s
  • megabucks
    ( n ) A lot of money. He made megabucks when he sold his company.
    1940s
  • megillah
    ( n ) A tediously detailed account. You don't have to give me the whole megillah, just the highlights.
    1940s
  • mellow
    ( adj ) Calm and relaxed. Campenella is a mellow fellow who doesn't let anything get on his nerves.
    1970s
  • mellow
    ( v ) To calm down. You need to mellow (out) and enjoy life.
    1970s
  • meltdown
    ( n ) Total collapse. There has been a meltdown in the relationship between my parents and me.
    1980s
  • melvin
    ( n ) A person the speaker dislikes. One who acts immature. What a melvin that guy is!
    1990s
  • melvin
    ( n ) Pulling someone's pants up sharply to wedge them between the buttocks. I snuck up behind Jimmy the Fink and gave him a melvin.
    1960s
  • mess
    ( v ) Associate or mix with. Don't mess (around) with people like that; they will get you in trouble.
    1790s
  • mess
    ( v ) Bother, annoy. Don't mess with me right now, I'm in a bad mood.
    1850s
  • mess
    ( n ) Bunch, group, a lot of. A mess of kids hang out at Taco's.
    1800s
  • Mickey-Mouse
    ( adj ) Easy, simple. The homework the teacher gave us was mickey mouse.
    1950s
  • Mickey-Mouse
    ( adj ) Minor, unimportant. Boswell ran some Mickey-Mouse radio station in Florida for a few years.
    1930s
  • Midas touch
    ( np ) Ability to make money, be successful. Donny has the Midas touch; everything he does makes him money.
    1650s
  • midnight auto supply
    ( np ) Obtaining auto parts through theft. These hubcaps are too cheap; they must have come from midnight auto supply.
    1950s
  • mint
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. We have a mint algebra teacher.
    1980s
  • minxy
    ( adj ) Alluring, seductive. She is a totally minxy fox.
    1930s
  • mirror warmer
    ( n ) A piece of pastel fabric from your girl tied around the rear view mirror. He was using one of her handkerchief's as a mirror warmer.
    1950s
  • Mo
    ( n ) Momentum, especially in a political campaign, favorable reaction. Once the mo was flowing in Eugene's favoar, the other candidates could not catch up.
    1980s
  • mob
    ( v ) To beat somebody up. That chick stole my guy; I'm going to go mob her!
    1990s
  • mob
    ( n ) An organized criminal syndicate. I heard the mob ordered a hit on Robin Banks.
    1820s
  • moby
    ( adj ) Exceptionally large. His house was really moby.
    1990s
  • mojo
    ( n ) Voodoo magic power, personal power, inner strength. The president used his mojo to guarantee sunny weather for commencement.
    1920s
  • moll
    ( n ) A mob doll, mobster's girlfriend. They say she was Capone's moll for a month or two.
    1820s
  • Monday morning quarterback
    ( np ) Someone who offers advice when it is too late. Fritz is a Monday morning quarterback who is never there when you need him.
    1930s
  • mondo
    ( adj ) Huge, humongous. Davy gave Santa a mondo list of toys he wants for Christmas.
    1960s
  • money
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That new band is money, daddy-o.
    1990s
  • monkey
    ( v ) To play carelessly. Don't monkey with the switch; you might start it up.
    1870s
  • moof
    ( v ) To sleep from drunkenness or intoxication. Murray had too much to drink and is now moofing on the couch.
    1990s
  • moolah
    ( n ) Money. This guy Seamus Allgood has mucho moolah.
    1940s
  • moon
    ( n ) Smooth, domed hubcap. Your car looks great with that new set of moons.
    1980s
  • moon
    ( v ) To drop your pants, bend over, and show your rear end. Just as he was mooning me, the principal walked by.
    1960s
  • move on
    ( v ) To flirt with, try to seduce. I am going to try to move on Sarah next Saturday.
    1960s
  • movie
    ( n ) A motion picture. I do enjoy a good movie after dinner.
    1900s
  • Mrs. Grundy
    ( np ) A priggish or prudish person. She is such a Mrs. Grundy that she refuses to go into the water.
    1920s
  • mud
    ( n ) An ugly female (offensive). If I ever kick it to a mud, just shoot me!
    1990s
  • mug
    ( n ) Face. Get out and don't let me see your mug in her again.
    1940s
  • mug
    ( v ) To make faces. He loves to mug with hit grandchildren.
    1940s
  • mug
    ( v ) To rob at gunpoint. He was mugged in Central Park for $40 and a ham sandwich.
    1960s
  • mug
    ( v ) To hug and kiss. I caught them mugging in the living room.
    1890s
  • mug
    ( n ) Guys of questionable intentions. Who are these mugs?
    1790s
  • mug (up)
    ( v ) To study hard. Did you mug up on your physics over the weekend?
    1840s
  • mug down
    ( v ) To hug and kiss. Eric and I were mugging down in the living room when the rents came in.
    1990s
  • mule
    ( n ) A carrier of illegal drugs. The cartel uses her as a mule to get their drugs into the country.
    1930s
  • mullet
    ( n ) A man's hairstyle with the hair cut short on the sides and in the front, but long and flowing down the back of the neck. Martin let his hair grow out and styled it into a mullet.
    1970s
  • mush
    ( n ) Nonsense. That is total mush and you know it.
    1990s
  • mush
    ( n ) Sentimentality. The movie was full of romantic mush.
    1910s
  • mutt
    ( n ) A dog. Hey, Fritz, what is your mutt barking at now?
    1900s

Do you like our Slang Dictionary?

You will probably like these other features of our website.