Word Frequency Lists Translation Services Word Databases
Alphadictionary.com

Our Sponsors

Technical Translation
Denver Colorado ArchitectWebsite TranslationClip Art
 

Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

Search For:

(Optional)
(Optional)
Clean Full
Or, browse by letter:

ABCDEFGH I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

74 Results in N (You are getting Full results. Get Clean Results for "N")

  • nab
    ( v ) To capture or arrest. They nabbed the robber within a block of the robbery.
    1680s
  • nab
    ( v ) To steal. Somebody nabbed my coat while I was in the meeting.
    1790s
  • nacho
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Wow! That party was nacho!
    1990s
  • nada
    ( n ) Nothing. We searched her car and found nada.
    1940s
  • nail
    ( v ) To have sex. [Use your imagination].
    1960s
  • narc
    ( n ) Narcotics officer. Watch out for the narks in the airport.
    1960s
  • nark
    ( n ) An informer, a tattle-tale. I saw the little nark coming out of police headquarters.
    1850s
  • natch
    ( adv ) Naturally, of course. Did I take him up on the offer? Natch, it was too good to pass up.
    1940s
  • navigate
    ( v ) To leave. It's late; lets navigate.
    1990s
  • neat
    ( adj ) OK, alright, suitable. That was a neat idea that you had.
    1970s
  • neat-o
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Martin's new hairdo is neat-o.
    1970s
  • neatnik
    ( n ) A person too concerned with neatness. Priscilla is such a neatnik she sorts her socks by color in their drawer.
    1960s
  • neck
    ( n ) A difficult person. Jimmy is acting like a neck.
    1990s
  • neck
    ( v ) To hug and kiss. There isn't enough room in my Beetle to neck.
    1950s
  • negative
    ( adv ) No, a negative answer. You want to go in? Negative, no one is allowed.
    1960s
  • negative
    ( n ) Something bad. There are too many negatives about the company merger.
    1620s
  • negatory
    ( adv ) No, a negative answer. That's negatory on the request for more money, son.
    1970s
  • nelly
    ( n ) Male homosexual That sweet old nelly wouldn't hurt a fly.
    1930s
  • nerd
    ( n ) A studious, unsociable person. See if you can get the nerd to leave his computer long enough to go for coffee.
    1950s
  • nerd
    ( n ) Computer devotee. Forget the nerd; he's connected to that computer by an umbilical cord.
    1980s
  • nerts
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. You are completely nerts if you think I will go with you.
    1920s
  • nerve
    ( n ) Audacity. You have some nerve telling me what to do!
    1940s
  • nest
    ( n ) A hair-do. Who did your new nest, Chucky?
    1990s
  • nest egg
    ( np ) A savings account for retirement. When he retired, he had a tidy little nest egg in the bank.
    1700s
  • Nice going!
    ( int ) Interjection of congratulations. Nice going on that 3-pointer you just shot.
    1940s
  • nick
    ( v ) To capture or arrest. The police nicked the shoplifter as he was leaving the store.
    1640s
  • nick
    ( v ) To steal. The shoplifter nicked the cop's badge as he was dragged out of the store.
    1620s
  • nickel
    ( n ) A 5-cent piece. Do you have a nickel for the parking meter?
    1850s
  • nickel-and-dime
    ( v ) To niggle away, eat a way bit by bit. These telephone bills are nickel-and-diming me something awful.
    1910s
  • nifty
    ( adj ) OK, alright, suitable. What a nifty gadget Prunella's electric fork is!
    1860s
  • nifty
    ( adj ) Neat, cute. She was wearing this really nifty, low-cut dress with a fringe around the hem.
    1950s
  • night owl
    ( np ) A person who stays out late. Bertram is a night owl who seldom gets up before noon.
    1920s
  • nip
    ( n ) A quick drink. He took a nip out of the bottle.
    1730s
  • nipper
    ( n ) A little boy. He has to stay home and take care of the little nipper today.
    1850s
  • nipper
    ( n ) A pickpocket. Some nipper nabbed my wallet at the market today.
    1830s
  • nippy
    ( adj ) Chilly. Better put on a coat; it is a little nippy outside today.
    1890s
  • nitnoid
    ( adj ) Trivial, picky. You really don't have to bring every little nitnoid problem to me.
    1990s
  • no clue
    ( np ) No idea. I have no clue as to what Rolly is doing tonight.
    1970s
  • No dice!
    ( int ) An interjection of rejection. I ask him for $10 but he said: No dice!
    1940s
  • No diggity?
    ( np ) An interjection of dismissal. Bill Gates is wealthy? No diggity.
    1990s
  • No joke!
    ( int ) An interjection of dismissal. The vote was along party lines? No joke!.
    1950s
  • No joke!
    ( int ) An interjection of emphasis. No joke! Ronnie really did let the air out of the tires of the squad car.
    1950s
  • no sweat
    ( np ) No problem. It's no sweat to have the report in to you by Monday.
    1950s
  • no way
    ( adv ) Absolutely not No way am I going to lick that frozen steel pole!
    1980s
  • No way!
    ( int ) Absolutely not! Let you borrow my car? No way!.
    1960s
  • No way, Jose!
    ( int ) Absolutely not! Let you borrow my car? No way, Jose!.
    1970s
  • no-brainer
    ( n ) An easy problem. Now, let me see, do I want to go to the show in Erie, PA or the one in Las Vegas? That's a no-brainer.
    1970s
  • no-brainer
    ( n ) Something easy to figure out and do. Aw, assembling this bike is a no-brainer.
    1970s
  • nobby
    ( adj ) Fashionable. What a nobby hat you have there!
    1850s
  • nod
    ( v ) Drift in and out of consciousness. He's been dropping acid; that's why he is nodding.
    1960s
  • noggin
    ( n ) The head. Francine ran into the door and got a knot on her noggin.
    1760s
  • nogoodnik
    ( n ) A bad or worthless person. So then the nogoodnik tramped across my clean kitchen floor in his muddy boots.
    1930s
  • nonce
    ( n ) A weak, indecisive person. You are nothing but a nonce!
    1980s
  • noodle
    ( n ) The head. Ow! I just bumped my noodle on that pipe up there.
    1910s
  • nook
    ( n ) A problem. You're facing a tough nook; how are you going to solve it?
    1990s
  • nooky
    ( n ) Female genitalia. [Use your imagination].
    1950s
  • nope
    ( adv ) No, a negative answer. Nope, I don't use dope.
    1880s
  • nose
    ( n ) An ability to detect. Lucy Lastik has a nose for good night spots.
    1870s
  • nose
    ( v ) An informer, a tattle-tale. The coppers had their noses all around town.
    1780s
  • Not a chance!
    ( int ) An interjection of rejection. Loan you $20? Not a chance!.
    1950s
  • Nothing doing!
    ( int ) An interjection of rejection. You want me to lend you $5 for the movies? Nothing doing!.
    1960s
  • Now you're on the trolley!
    ( phr ) Now you have caught on. Yeah, Yeah! Monday comes BEFORE Tuesday. Now you're on the trolley!
    1920s
  • nowhere
    ( adv ) Bad, no good. That song is nowhere.
    1980s
  • nudnik
    ( n ) An irritating person. Get that nudnik out of here; I can't stand her.
    1920s
  • nugget
    ( n ) The head. I don't know how you got that idea in your nugget.
    2000s
  • nuggets
    ( n ) Loose change. Hey, man, do you have any nuggets in your pocket?
    1990s
  • nuke
    ( n ) A nuclear weapon. Does that attack plane have any nukes?
    1960s
  • nuke
    ( v ) To attack with nuclear weapons. If they don't do what we tell them to do, why don't we nuke them?
    1960s
  • nuke
    ( v ) To heat up in the microwave. I'll nuke our dinner in a few minutes.
    1980s
  • number one
    ( np ) Yourself. I'm taking care of number one and you guys can fend for yourselves.
    1950s
  • nut
    ( n ) A crazy person. I think that he is a nut.
    1900s
  • nuts
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. You are completely nuts if you think I will go with you.
    1940s
  • Nuts!
    ( int ) An interjection of disappointment. Nuts! I dropped my glasses down the sewer drain.
    1910s
  • nutty
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. You must be nutty to think I would join the choir.
    1890s

Do you like our Slang Dictionary?

You will probably like these other features of our website.