Word Frequency Lists Translation Services Word Databases
Alphadictionary.com

Our Sponsors

Technical Translation
Denver Colorado ArchitectWebsite TranslationClip Art
 

Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

Search For:

(Optional)
(Optional)
Clean Full
Or, browse by letter:

ABCDEFGH I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

45 Results in O (You are getting Full results. Get Clean Results for "O")

  • obese
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That movie is beyond phat; it is totally obese!
    2000s
  • odd ball
    ( np ) An eccentric. Freddie is a sort of odd ball who likes to take walks in the park.
    1930s
  • off
    ( v ) To kill. The mobbed offed the squealer before he got home from the police station.
    1970s
  • off
    ( v ) To make angry, mad. My parents are going to be offed when they see my grades.
    1990s
  • off the deep end
    ( pp ) To lose control of yourself, go crazy. Billy Ray went off the deep end when his wife left him.
    1920s
  • off the hook
    ( pp ) Exceptionally good. Did you see John's new kicks? They are off the hook.
    1980s
  • off the hook
    ( pp ) Exonerated, cleared of guilt. I'm glad Lloyd confessed to blowing the toilet; that let's me off the hook.
    1940s
  • off the wall
    ( pp ) Crazy, insane. Most of what he says is off the wall.
    1950s
  • offie
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. You can't talk to that offie; don't even try.
    1990s
  • ogle
    ( v ) Stare at. Stop ogling the girls, Stanley, and help me fix the car!
    1680s
  • oil can
    ( n ) A stupid female. I took that oil can out once--never again!
    1920s
  • old lady
    ( n ) Mother. My old lady burned the pancakes.
    1940s
  • old man
    ( n ) Father. His old man won't let him drive the car.
    1920s
  • on cloud nine
    ( pp ) Really happy. She's been on cloud nine ever since she got her new car.
    1960s
  • on cloud seven
    ( pp ) Really happy. She's been on cloud seven ever since she got her new car.
    1950s
  • on edge
    ( pp ) Nervous. All this waiting to hear from the doctor has me on edge.
    1930s
  • on fire
    ( pp ) Excellent, outstanding. Leroy was on fire last night.
    1550s
  • on the lam
    ( pp ) Fleeing from the law. Morgan was on the lam for five years, then spent five more in the joint.
    1920s
  • on the level
    ( pp ) Honest, truthful. On the level, now, did you take Mary Pickford out to supper?
    1920s
  • on the make
    ( pp ) Flirting, looking for someone to seduce. The way she is talking to all the men looks like she is on the make.
    1920s
  • on the make
    ( pp ) Looking for profit or advantage. His words with me suggested that he is on the make for a promotion.
    1860s
  • on the make
    ( pp ) Flirting, making advances on people of the opposite sex. Clara Belle was down at the bar last night on the make.
    1910s
  • on the make
    ( pp ) Ambitious, out to succeed. Elroy dressed like a man on the make in the financial world.
    1860s
  • on the nose
    ( pp ) Exactly. Boy, are you right on the nose when you say gas prices are high.
    1940s
  • on the rag
    ( pp ) Having one's menstrual period. I'm not in the mood; I am on my rag.
    1950s
  • on the stick
    ( pp ) Bright, prepared. This new freshman is always on the stick when it comes to homework.
    1950s
  • on the take
    ( pp ) Taking bribes. You'll have to find a judge on the take to get out of this one.
    1930s
  • on the up and up
    ( pp ) Honest, truthful. I think he is on the up and up when he says he owns 27 banks.
    1920s
  • one-upmanship
    ( n ) Showing off by trying to be better than everyone else. Every thing that Polly Graf says about herself is colored by her constant one-upmanship.
    1950s
  • one-upsmanship
    ( n ) Showing off by trying to be better than everyone else. Every thing that Polly Graf says about herself is colored by her constant one-upsmanship.
    1950s
  • oneupmanship
    ( n ) Showing off by trying to be better than everyone else. Every thing that Polly Graf says about herself is colored by her constant oneupmanship.
    1950s
  • oomph
    ( ) Spirit, strength, power. You need to sing that song with a little more oomph to get it across.
    1930s
  • ornery
    ( adj ) Mean. Arnold had an ornery bull that no one could approach.
    1850s
  • ossified
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He was so ossified we had to drag him to the car.
    1920s
  • out
    ( adj ) Out of fashion. Hoop skirts have been out for fifty years.
    1960s
  • out
    ( adj ) Unacceptable, out of the question. Skipping that class is out.
    1960s
  • out of it
    ( pp ) Unknowledgeable, unaware of what is what. He's so old he's out of it.
    1960s
  • out of sight
    ( pp ) Excellent, outstanding. Hey Kalen, that tie-dyed top your wearing is out of sight.
    1960s
  • out of this world
    ( pp ) Excellent, outstanding. Maggie's gown for the prom is out of this world.
    1930s
  • out to lunch
    ( pp ) Having no idea what is going on. Do you understand what I'm saying or are you out to lunch?
    1970s
  • out-the-gate
    ( pp ) Excellent, outstanding. You're going to cut your hair? That's out-the-gate!
    1980s
  • over the edge
    ( pp ) Crazy, insane. I think another bit of bad news would push Billy Ray over the edge.
    1920s
  • over the hill
    ( pp ) Too old. My dad can't understand a word I way; he's over the hill.
    1960s
  • owled
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He was so owled we had to drag him to the car.
    1920s
  • oyster
    ( n ) A jolly good fellow. Horace set me up with a beautiful blind date. Quite an oyster, that Horace.
    1880s

Do you like our Slang Dictionary?

You will probably like these other features of our website.