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Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

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151 Results in P (You are getting Full results. Get Clean Results for "P")

  • P. I.
    ( abb ) A private investigator. Serena hired a P. I. to tail her husband.
    1930s
  • pad
    ( n ) Where you live. Have you found a pad yet?
    1960s
  • pain in the ass
    ( np ) Annoyance. Having to redo my homework is a real pain in the ass.
    1950s
  • pain in the neck
    ( np ) Annoyance. My wife's best friend is a pain in the neck.
    1940s
  • palooka
    ( n ) A strong male. I'm just waiting for the right palooka to come along and sweep me off my feet.
    1920s
  • pan
    ( v ) To criticize severely. Lucy Lastik's ice-skating routine was panned by the judges.
    1900s
  • pantywaist
    ( n ) A weak, indecisive person. Gordon is such a pantywaist he does everything his girlfriend tells him.
    1890s
  • paper
    ( n ) Money. I have to get me some paper if I'm going to the movies tonight.
    1980s
  • paper chase
    ( np ) Reading and recording everything on paper. I've escaped the paper chase and now do all my research electronically.
    1970s
  • paper-pusher
    ( n ) Bureaucratic office workers. My office is filled with paper-pushers.
    1960s
  • paper-shaker
    ( np ) Cheerleader or pom-pom girl. He's been dating one of the paper-shakers named Fawn.
    1980s
  • park
    ( v ) To hug and kiss in a parked car. Freddie and Mayola love to park up on Mulholland Drive.
    1950s
  • parlay
    ( v ) To talk flirtatiously. Check out Reggie parlaying with Shana.
    1980s
  • party animal
    ( np ) Someone who loves parties. You're too old to be a party animal.
    1970s
  • party-hearty
    ( adj ) Parties, loves parties. We need to party-hearty because we just got a raise in salary.
    1980s
  • party-pooper
    ( n ) A squelcher. Don't be a party-pooper and leave so early.
    1950s
  • passion pit
    ( np ) Drive-in movie theatre. We made out in the passion pit last night.
    1950s
  • paste
    ( v ) To hit. When he called me a 'wuss', I pasted him one on the kisser.
    1830s
  • paste
    ( v ) To hit. When he called me a 'wuss', I pasted him one on the kisser.
    1830s
  • patootie
    ( n ) The buttocks. Get out of here before I kick you in the patootie!
    1950s
  • patsy
    ( n ) A scapegoat. Roy stole the horse and left me behind to be the patsy.
    1940s
  • paw
    ( n ) Hand. Get your paws off of my body!
    1940s
  • payola
    ( n ) A bribe to promote a song on radio or TV. It is hard to believe that most of the songs we sing are popular only because disc jockeys received payola.
    1930s
  • peace
    ( n ) Good bye. Peace, everyone; I'll see you all tomorrow.
    1960s
  • peace out
    ( v ) To make a farewell greeting. Porky was here most of the night but he peaced out about a half hour ago.
    1990s
  • peanuts
    ( n ) Little money. I am not going to work for peanuts.
    1940s
  • pearl
    ( v ) To leave. I'll catch you later. I'm about to pearl.
    1990s
  • pecker
    ( n ) The male organ. [Use your imagination].
    1920s
  • pee off
    ( v ) To make angry, mad. Why are you peed off with me? I didn't scratch your fender.
    1950s
  • peel out
    ( v ) To screech your tires pulling out. Ferlin just left; I heard him peel out.
    1960s
  • peep
    ( n ) Person. The street was full of peeps
    2000s
  • peepers
    ( n ) Eyes. Cast your peepers at the hottie over by the door.
    1940s
  • peepers
    ( n ) Glasses. He can't see his fingers without his peepers.
    1690s
  • peeps
    ( n ) People, workers. I'll have my peeps talk to your peeps and we'll close this deal.
    2000s
  • peg
    ( v ) To throw (a ball). Snidley was pegged out sliding into second base.
    1790s
  • peg
    ( v ) Figure out, come to understand. I've got Randolph pegged: he's a dirty, rotten rat!
    1920s
  • pegged pants
    ( np ) Pants tapering to a narrow opening at the cuff. He was all decked out in a ducktail haircut and a pair of pegged pants.
    1950s
  • peggers
    ( n ) Pants tapering to a narrow opening at the cuff. He always wore peggers and a T-shirt to class.
    1950s
  • percolate
    ( v ) Operate, get on, function. How are things percolating around here?
    1960s
  • perk
    ( n ) Perquisite, benefit on a job. The only perk that comes with this job is a key to the bathroom.
    1860s
  • perky
    ( adj ) Lively in a cutesy way. Kay Largo is a perky as a cheerleader.
    1810s
  • perpetrate
    ( v ) To pretend. Why is that wigger always perpetrating?
    1990s
  • pet
    ( v ) To hug and kiss. They must be in love; I saw them petting at the drive-in last night.
    1920s
  • phat
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That group's music is hella phat.
    1960s
  • phatty
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. She is a phatty fatty.
    1960s
  • pick up
    ( v ) To try to get a stranger of the opposite sex to go home with you. Hey, let's go to the football game tonight and pick up a couple of girls.
    1920s
  • pick-up
    ( n ) You can always find pick-ups at a Hot 101 concert. You can always find pick-ups at a Hot 101 concert.
    1920s
  • pickle
    ( n ) Jam, trouble. She is such an airhead, getting in one pickle after another.
    1950s
  • pickle
    ( pp ) Trouble. Pedro forgot that he had invited Remona to the party and got himself in a pickle when he invited Kristin, too.
    1950s
  • pickled
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He gets pickled after only one beer.
    1950s
  • piece
    ( n ) A gun. I hope you aren't carrying a piece.
    1970s
  • piece
    ( n ) Female genitalia. [Use your imagination].
    1780s
  • piece
    ( n ) Girl (offensive). She is a pretty piece, don't you think?
    1960s
  • piece of cake
    ( n ) Something easy. Working on a computer for me is a piece of cake.
    1930s
  • pig
    ( n ) An ugly female (offensive). She is such a pig no one will ask her out.
    1970s
  • pig
    ( n ) Glutton. He is a pig at parties.
    1920s
  • pig
    ( n ) A policeman. Beat it! The pigs are coming!
    1960s
  • pig out
    ( v ) Overeat. Let's go to the restaurant and pig out.
    1970s
  • pigeon
    ( n ) A gullible person. He is a con man looking for a pigeon to fleece.
    1590s
  • pigeon
    ( n ) An ugly female (offensive). The gym looked like a pigeon coop with all the dogs there.
    1990s
  • piker
    ( n ) Cheapskate. That piker wouldn't pay more than $5 for a meal.
    1870s
  • piker
    ( n ) A cheapskate. The piker always makes me pay for the gas.
    1920s
  • pill
    ( n ) A basketball. Throw me the pill; I have a shot!
    1980s
  • pill
    ( n ) An unlikable person. She is a bitter pill to take with her uppity attitude and all.
    1920s
  • pill
    ( n ) Anything difficult. Paying $1200 in taxes is a tough pill to take.
    1930s
  • pimp
    ( n ) Manager of prostitutes. He was driving in a chrome-plated caddy a pimp would be proud to drive.
    1600s
  • pimp
    ( v ) To flirt, try to seduce. Look at him pimping that manikin; he's smashed.
    1990s
  • pinch
    ( v ) To capture or arrest. I heard Sedgewick got pinched for shoplifting.
    1920s
  • pip
    ( n ) A difficult person. Hulda is quite a pip; she likes to do things her way.
    1950s
  • pip
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. Gwendolyn always pays the bill; she's a pip.
    1920s
  • pipe down
    ( v ) Be quiet. Pipe down! I want to hear what the president is saying.
    1920s
  • pipes
    ( n ) The voice. Bertha D. Blues had a gorgeous set of pipes.
    1560s
  • pistol
    ( n ) A dynamic person. Martha's in every organization in town: she's a real pistol.
    1940s
  • pit stop
    ( np ) Stop for a bathroom. Let's make a pit stop at the next rest area.
    1970s
  • place
    ( n ) Where you live. Why don't you come over to my place sometimes?
    1340s
  • plastered
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He was so plastered we had to roll him down the embankment to the car.
    1920s
  • play chicken
    ( vp ) A head-on race between two cars in which the first to pull to the side loses. Manny was seriously injured playing chicken with his friend.
    1950s
  • play hooky
    ( vp ) To miss, to not attend. Are you going to school today or playing hooky?
    1850s
  • plonk
    ( n ) Cheap wine, wine of poor quality. Mable, we can't serve plonk with these bugers; they deserve better.
    1930s
  • plug
    ( v ) To shoot someone. The body had been plugged twice.
    1830s
  • plug
    ( n ) A worn-out horse. I would be ashamed to put a plug like yours in a horse show.
    1860s
  • plug for
    ( v ) To promote, advance. Maudie brought the boss presents every day when she was plugging for a promotion.
    1900s
  • plugged nickel
    ( np ) Something worthless. That car of his isn't worth a plugged nickel.
    1930s
  • plugola
    ( n ) A bribe to promote someone or something. Anyone can become famous if they pay enough plugola.
    1950s
  • plunk
    ( v ) To strum, to pick a stringed instrument. Billy Joe was plunking away on his banjo when I came in.
    1800s
  • plunk
    ( v ) To shoot or hit with a flying object. As soon as I saw that big fat turkey, I plunked him!
    1880s
  • plunk down
    ( vp ) To pay. I plunked down two hundred bucks for this car; it had better be good.
    1890s
  • po
    ( n ) The police. The po was posted on the corner waiting to bust the party.
    1990s
  • po-po
    ( n ) The police. Watch out! It's the po-po!
    1990s
  • pokey
    ( n ) Jail or prison. When his brother got out of the pokey, he went right back to making book.
    1910s
  • pony up
    ( v ) To pay up your share. Dad finally ponied up $500 so I could get the guitar.
    1820s
  • pony-tail
    ( n ) Long hair tied in back with a rubber band. The professor thought he was cool, wearing a pony tail.
    1950s
  • pooch
    ( n ) A dog. Hey, man! Where'd you get the cool pooch?
    1920s
  • pooch out
    ( v ) Stick out, protrude. Millie, why is your stomach pooching out like that?
    1930s
  • poodle
    ( n ) Inferior female. Check out that poodle over there by herself!
    1990s
  • poop out
    ( v ) Get tired. He pooped out after we started to do the hard work.
    1950s
  • pooper
    ( np ) A squelcher. Don't invite Marvin; he is such as pooper he'll ruin the party.
    1950s
  • pop
    ( v ) To hit. Shut up or I will pop you.
    1920s
  • pop
    ( v ) To kill. The boss said to pop anyone who squeals.
    1970s
  • pop for something
    ( vp ) Pay for. It is my turn to pop for the doughnuts.
    1970s
  • poppins
    ( adj ) Perfect. She thinks she is so poppins.
    1990s
  • port-holer
    ( np ) A 57 Thunderbird. Lucky guy! His dad owns a port-holer.
    1970s
  • port-sider
    ( n ) A left-hander. Lefty is a port-sider that right-handed batters can't hit.
    1890s
  • poser
    ( n ) Someone who pretends to be important. Greeley is a straight up poser.
    1990s
  • posh
    ( adj ) Luxurious. Larry, Harry, Barry, and Mary stayed in the poshest hotel in Paris.
    1910s
  • posse
    ( n ) A clique, circle of friends. I'll stick to my posse; you stick to yours.
    1990s
  • post
    ( adj ) To position in a particular place. The po was posted on the corner waiting to bust the party.
    1980s
  • post up
    ( n ) To position in a particular place. I was posted up all day on the corner.
    1980s
  • postal
    ( adj ) Out of control. Don't go postal, now, just because I stepped on your toe.
    1990s
  • posy
    ( n ) A flower or bouquet of flowers. Is the poor baby sick? Let's send him some posies.
    1500s
  • potent
    ( adj ) Fine or good. That new car of his is potent, man.
    1990s
  • potted
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He was so potted we had to drag him to the car.
    1920s
  • potty
    ( adj ) Slightly crazy, insane. You must be potty to go out with that geek
    1920s
  • pound
    ( v ) Beaten up. Marlow got pounded by a gang on the way home from school.
    1790s
  • pound
    ( v ) Drink a lot. He pounded too many beers last night.
    1980s
  • preppy
    ( adj ) Someone who dresses like a conformist at a private (prep) school. Nobody likes her because she dresses so preppy.
    1970s
  • primed
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He was so primed we had to pull him to the car in my kid brother's wagon.
    1920s
  • primo
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Hey, man, those kicks are primo.
    1970s
  • Princeton cut
    ( np ) Close haircut. That Princeton cut makes him look too preppy.
    1950s
  • props
    ( n ) Admiration for something well done. She has props from friends and family but still can't pull it all together.
    1990s
  • psych
    ( v ) To influence mentally. I'm really psyched for cleaning up my room this weekend.
    1960s
  • psycho
    ( n ) A crazy person. Lila is a psycho who should be in a hospital.
    1950s
  • pug-ugly
    ( adj ) Very ugly. Luella and her pug-ugly friend came to the party late.
    1910s
  • puke
    ( v, n ) To vomit. I feel like I am going to puke.
    1930s
  • pull
    ( n ) A draw on a pipe, cigarette, etc. Hey, dude, give me a pull on that coffin nail; I'm having a nicotine fit.
    1860s
  • pull
    ( n ) A swallow. Hey, man, give me a pull on that iced tea.
    1980s
  • pull
    ( n ) Influence. Ask Fred to help you; he has a lot of pull at city hall.
    1940s
  • pull rank
    ( vp ) To force someone to do something because you have the authority to do so. I didn't want to go but the boss pulled rank on me and made me.
    1920s
  • pull up stakes
    ( vp ) To move to a new home. When Bubberly lost his job, he pulled up stakes and moved to Italy.
    1700s
  • pull your chain
    ( vp ) To annoy, bother. Boyd has been awfully quiet lately; let's pull his chain and ask how he is doing with that girl who just left him.
    1980s
  • pump
    ( v ) To enthuse. I love chemistry exams and I'm pumped for this one.
    1970s
  • pump up
    ( v ) To enthuse. Harry pumped everyone up to go to the beach.
    1970s
  • punch-drunk
    ( adj ) Brain-damaged from boxing. He had to quit the ring when he became to punch-drunk to focus his eyes.
    1910s
  • punch-drunk
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. Don't listen to that punch-drunk bum; he's crazy.
    1930s
  • punk
    ( n ) A young hooligan. All the punks in the neighborhood hang out at the pool hall.
    1920s
  • punk
    ( n ) Incense. What kind of punk are you burning, man?
    1960s
  • punk
    ( v ) To embarrass. It really punked me, when he told everyone my chemistry grade.
    2000s
  • punk
    ( v ) To steal. I heard Gena's car got punked.
    1990s
  • punk out
    ( v ) To back out from cowardice. We were going over Niagara Falls in a barrel but Jason punked out.
    1920s
  • push off
    ( v ) To leave. I am going to push off now.
    1950s
  • pushover
    ( n ) A person easily convinced. Ask Zelda for 5 bucks: she's such a pushover, she'll give it to you.
    1920s
  • Put 'em up!
    ( vp ) To raise your hands. Drop that gun and put 'em up!
    1930s
  • put a bee in your bonnet
    ( vp ) Tell something interesting. Why are you grinning? You look like somebody's put a bee in your bonnet.
    1930s
  • put a cork in it
    ( vp ) To stop talking. You talk too much; put a cork in it.
    1970s
  • put down
    ( v ) To criticize. You put down everything I do!
    1970s
  • put on
    ( v ) To deceive or gull. I don't believe a word you say; you have to be putting me on.
    1960s
  • put on the Ritz
    ( vp ) To do something in high style. I just got my bonus--tonight we're putting on the Ritz.
    1920s
  • put out
    ( v ) To intentionally allure men. Mavis was at the party putting out, as usual.
    1950s
  • Put that on!
    ( vp ) An interjection of surprise. Sterling has a new car. Put that on!.
    1990s
  • put the moves on
    ( vp ) To flirt, try to seduce. Victor put the moves on me at the game last night but I ignored him.
    1970s
  • put-on
    ( n ) A deception. It was an elaborate put-on which I almost believed.
    1930s

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