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Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

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117 Results in R (You are getting Clean results. Get Full Results for "R")

  • rabbit ears
    ( np ) Indoor television antennae. He can't get diddledy on his TV with those rabbit ears.
    1950s
  • rack
    ( n ) Bed. I have to hit the rack by ten or I'll be tired in the morning.
    1960s
  • rack out
    ( v ) To sleep. I am going to rack out for two hours.
    1950s
  • rad
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Her new spiked doo is positively rad.
    1980s
  • radical
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Her new book is positively radical.
    1970s
  • radioactive
    ( adj ) Very popular. You'll never get her to go out with you: that chick's radioactive.
    1990s
  • raft
    ( n ) A large number. He had a whole raft of chickens in the back yard.
    1830s
  • rag
    ( n ) Newspaper. We get very little international news in our local rag.
    1920s
  • rag
    ( v ) To make fun of, tease. My brother is always ragging me about my girlfriend.
    1940s
  • rag doll
    ( np ) A compliant person. Terry is such a rag doll; she never says no.
    1970s
  • rage
    ( n ) A great party. The last rage of the year was a major blast!
    1980s
  • raggedy
    ( adj ) In bad condition. Get your raggedy ride out a here poser!
    1890s
  • ragtop
    ( np ) A convertible car. There were a lot of ragtops at the auto show.
    1950s
  • rah
    ( n ) A rich person. Check out the rah in the Beemer.
    1990s
  • rail
    ( n ) A high-speed dragster. How fast is your rail?
    1960s
  • rake
    ( n ) A lowered front end on a hotrod. He just gave his rod a rake and twice pipes; nice.
    1950s
  • rake
    ( v ) To lower the front end of a hotrod. It doesn't look like much now but when I rake it, it will be hot stuff.
    1950s
  • ralph
    ( v ) To vomit. Like Mike? I almost ralph every time I see him.
    1980s
  • rank
    ( v ) To back out from cowardice. The girl said she was going to come over to my house and beat me up but she ranked out.
    1990s
  • rap
    ( n ) An accusation. Eustace has a rap sheet as long as your arm.
    1900s
  • rap
    ( v ) To talk informally. I went to Grunelda's last night and we rapped for hours.
    1960s
  • rap session
    ( np ) An informal conversation. We had a rap session over at the prof's last night.
    1960s
  • raspberry
    ( n ) Blowing air through the closed lips to make a disgusting sound. I guess the date didn't go very well; she gave me a raspberry rather than a kiss when I took her home.
    1890s
  • rasta
    ( int ) Good-bye. Rasta, baby; I have to jet.
    1990s
  • rat
    ( n ) A contemptible person. The little rat won't do anything I tell him.
    1900s
  • rat
    ( n ) An informer, a tattle-tale. The little rat told the principal!
    1900s
  • rat
    ( v ) To inform or tattle. Little Augie ratted out the godfather.
    1960s
  • rat fink
    ( np ) An informer, a tattle-tale; nasty person The rat fink went to the cops.
    1960s
  • rat hole
    ( np ) A nasty, dirty place. Mortimer lives in a rat hole.
    1810s
  • rat hole
    ( np ) A place from which there is no return. Buying this old car would be throwing your money down a rat hole.
    1960s
  • Rats!
    ( int ) An interjection of disappointment. Rats! We're out of gas.
    1880s
  • rattle
    ( v ) To upset, agitate. Nothing rattles her; she is a cool as a cucumber.
    1780s
  • rattle your cage
    ( vp ) To annoy, bother. If the suspect won't talk, let's file some charges against him and rattle his cage.
    1960s
  • rattletrap
    ( n ) Old, broken-down car. Rudy will never make it to the beach in that old rattletrap of his.
    1820s
  • rattletrap
    ( n ) Old, broken-down car. Rudy will never make it to the beach in that old rattletrap of his.
    1820s
  • ratty
    ( adj ) In bad condition. She was in an old pair of jeans and a ratty sweater.
    1860s
  • ratty
    ( adj ) Unfair. He got a ratty assignment in Java.
    1900s
  • raunchy
    ( adj ) Dirty, grimy. Get out of those raunchy clothes and take bath.
    1930s
  • raunchy
    ( adj ) Risqué, bawdy. He can't tell a joke that isn't raunchy.
    1960s
  • raw
    ( adj ) New, inexperienced. The raw office workers were not getting much done.
    1560s
  • rays
    ( v ) Sunshine for a sun tan. Let's catch some rays before class.
    1970s
  • razz
    ( v ) To tease, make fun of. The baseball fans started to razz the umpire.
    1920s
  • razzle-dazzle
    ( n ) Something fancy. She's all razzle-dazzle but without substance.
    1880s
  • razzmatazz
    ( n ) Something fancy. There is too much razzmatazz in his church services for my taste.
    1890s
  • Reach for the ceiling!
    ( phr ) Raise your hands. Drop that gun and reach for the ceiling!
    1910s
  • Reach for the roof!
    ( phr ) Raise your hands. Drop that gun and reach for the roof!
    1910s
  • Reach for the sky!
    ( phr ) Raise your hands. Drop that gun and reach for the sky!
    1940s
  • read the riot act
    ( vp ) To scold, chastise severely. When mom saw the condition of my room, she read me the riot act.
    1900s
  • real
    ( vp ) Excellent, outstanding. That scene was real.
    1980s
  • real
    ( adj ) Smart, intelligent. Get real! You can't drive home in your condition.
    1960s
  • real gone
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. The Fonz is a real gone cat.
    1960s
  • ream out
    ( v ) To scold, chastise. The boss really reamed him out for his bad report.
    1950s
  • recognize
    ( v ) To respect. Boy you better recognize me!
    1990s
  • red hot
    ( ap ) Exciting. Your idea is really red hot.
    1920s
  • redneck
    ( n ) A clumsy, unsophisticated person from the country. Some redneck in a pickup with a gun rack tried to run me off the road.
    1830s
  • reject
    ( n ) A stupid person. The new kid on the block is a total reject.
    1960s
  • rentals
    ( n ) Parents. The rentals are coming out for a visit next weekend.
    1990s
  • rents
    ( n ) Parents. My rents just sent me a thousand bucks!
    1970s
  • represent
    ( v ) Trying achieve respect. I'm just trying to represent.
    1990s
  • retard
    ( n ) A stupid person. All the retards gather at that bar; I never go there.
    1970s
  • retread
    ( n ) An old performer making a comeback. It was supposed to be a great show but it was just a bunch of retreads doing old stuff.
    1940s
  • rev
    ( adj ) Revolting, ugly. That dress is so rev; take it off!
    1990s
  • rev
    ( v ) To excite. I am totally revved about going to Maui!
    1980s
  • rhubarb
    ( n ) Argument, squabble. Harry Batten was thrown out of the game for getting in a rhubarb with the umpire behind homeplate.
    1940s
  • ricky
    ( n ) A stupid person; a jerk; a loser. That guy thinks he's cool, but he's a just another ricky.
    1990s
  • ride
    ( n ) A car or other vehicle. That's a pretty rusty ride you have their, Lester.
    1950s
  • ride low
    ( v ) To annoy, bother. Selma is riding me low asking me for my phone number.
    1990s
  • Right on!
    ( int ) An interjection of agreement. You want to raise collards in the garden? Right on!.
    1950s
  • righteous
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That new baseball bat of his is righteous, man.
    1970s
  • rightsize
    ( v ) To fire people. They are rightsizing the company by 1000 jobs.
    1990s
  • rinky-dink
    ( adj ) Run-down, old, old fashioned. The circus was really rinky-dink.
    1910s
  • riot
    ( n ) A great time, something hilarious. The comedy program was a real riot.
    1930s
  • rip off
    ( v ) To steal. You can't leave anything on the sidewalk because it will be ripped off.
    1960s
  • rip-city
    ( n ) Fun, excitement. All of Sally's parties are rip-city.
    1990s
  • rip-off
    ( n ) A scam. $7.50 for a cup of latte is a rip-off.
    1960s
  • rip-snorter
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. His party last night was a rip-snorter.
    1930s
  • rip-snorting
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Let me tell you, it was a rip-snorting party.
    1930s
  • ripped
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He's so ripped he can't find his pocket.
    1950s
  • ripped
    ( adj ) Muscular. His body is more ripped than any dude's in school.
    1980s
  • rise up
    ( v ) To back away, back off. Man, you had better rise up off me!
    1990s
  • ritzy
    ( adj ) Luxurious. She expected to be taken to a ritzy uptown club, not to a dive in the Bronx.
    1920s
  • road hog
    ( np ) Someone who takes up to much of the road. I can't pass because the driver ahead of me is a road hog.
    1950s
  • roadie
    ( n ) An ugly female (offensive). That party was just full of roadies.
    1990s
  • rock
    ( n ) A diamond or other precious stone. Whenever Arlene complains about being a kept woman, Mortimer gives her another rock and she shuts up.
    1940s
  • rock
    ( n ) Fast music, rock and roll. I don't like jazz or rap--I'm a straight rock guy.
    1960s
  • rock
    ( v ) To be excellent, outstanding. It rocks that the library is going to be open on weekends.
    1970s
  • rock
    ( v ) To dance wildly to the rock and roll music of the 60s and 70s. Man, I really dig this music; let's rock!
    1960s
  • rock out
    ( v ) To be excellent, outstanding. About midnight the party was really rocking out.
    1980s
  • rocket
    ( n ) A fast car. What a bogus race: a rocket against a stone.
    1960s
  • rocks
    ( n ) Ice. Would you like your whiskey on the rocks?
    1940s
  • rod
    ( n ) A car (hot-rodders). Delmar has the hottest rod on the block.
    1950s
  • roid
    ( n ) A steroid user in sports Three home runs in one game? Is he on roids?
    1970s
  • roll
    ( v ) To leave. Eleven o'clock? It's time to roll!
    1950s
  • roll
    ( v ) To spend time talking. I'm rolling with the homies.
    1990s
  • roll
    ( v ) To rob someone drunk or sleeping. He got plastered last night and some woman he met in the bar rolled him.
    1870s
  • roll out
    ( v ) To leave. It's getting late; we are about to roll out.
    1980s
  • rook
    ( v ) To cheat or deceive. You paid $5 for that? You've been rooked.
    1590s
  • root
    ( v ) To cheer for. He always roots for the home tema.
    1880s
  • roscoe
    ( n ) A handgun. Gimme yer roscoe, Roscoe; I can't crack this walnut with my teeth."
    1910s
  • rot-gut
    ( n ) Bad quality liquor. I never drink that rot-gut hooch Harold buys from his uncle.
    1730s
  • rough rider
    ( n ) A person with an excellent car. That dude she goes with is a rough rider with a really slick rod.
    1990s
  • roughhouse
    ( v ) To play rough. OK, you guys. No roughhousing in the living room.
    1940s
  • royal shaft
    ( np ) A great destructive unfair act. He got the royal shaft from the principal for cutting so many classes.
    1950s
  • rub out
    ( v ) To kill. Several members of the competing gang were rubbed out.
    1940s
  • rubber
    ( n ) A loser, a jerk. Why you being such a rubber?
    1990s
  • rube
    ( n ) A clumsy, unsophisticated person from the country. I must have looked like some rube when I signed the contract to buy the Brooklyn Bridge.
    1920s
  • rubes
    ( n ) Money. I have to stay home tonight: no rubes.
    1920s
  • rubin
    ( n ) One of the large, new US bills. I got a rubin at the ATM yesterday.
    1990s
  • rug
    ( n ) A toupee, a wig. Is that a rug on his head?
    1940s
  • rug rat
    ( n ) A small child. I'm just not ready for a steady job and a house full of rug rats.
    1970s
  • rug rat
    ( np ) Small child. Pam is married now, with two rug rats.
    1970s
  • ruined
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. We pounded a case of beer last night and, man, was I ruined.
    1990s
  • rule
    ( v ) To be excellent, outstanding. Leather rules when it comes to car interiors.
    1980s
  • run around
    ( v ) To associate with. Rodney runs around with a shady crowd.
    1880s
  • run off at the mouth
    ( vp ) To talk too much. He is always running off at the mouth.
    1950s
  • run out of gas
    ( vp ) To lose interest or momentum. The politician ran out of gas during the campaign.
    1940s
  • rush
    ( n ) A sudden pleasant surge of the senses. I don't get much of a rush from shelling peas.
    1970s

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