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Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

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354 Results in S (You are getting Full results. Get Clean Results for "S")

  • saccharin
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That's so saccharin!
    1990s
  • sack
    ( n ) Bed. When did you hit the sack last night?
    1950s
  • sack
    ( v ) To fire. Jake got sacked for smoking in his office.
    1840s
  • sack out
    ( v ) To sleep. Peeby sacked out over at Frieda's last night.
    1960s
  • salty
    ( adj ) Disrespectful. Don't get all salty with me!
    1990s
  • salty
    ( adj ) Risqué, bawdy. He likes to sing salty songs.
    1860s
  • sano
    ( n ) Very clean, pristine. Ron did a sano job on his '56 Chevy.
    1970s
  • sap
    ( v ) To hit, to club. The police sapped all the strikers and chased them away.
    1920s
  • sap
    ( v ) To study. Renfrow saps all night; no wonder he makes such good grades.
    1830s
  • sap
    ( n ) A stupid person. Don't be a sap! If it looks too good to be true, it isn't.
    1920s
  • sappy
    ( adj ) Gullible. He is so sappy I'm surprised he hasn't bought the Brooklyn Bridge.
    1940s
  • sappy
    ( adj ) Overly sentimental. I hate those sappy movies where everyone gets married and lives happily ever after.
    1940s
  • sashay
    ( v ) To go. Why don't you sashay over to the store and get some bottled water?
    1830s
  • sauce
    ( n ) Liquor. I hear her dad is on the sauce.
    1960s
  • sauce
    ( n ) Steroids. Look at those biceps; that guy's on the sauce.
    1980s
  • sauced
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. Man we got sauced last night at that party.
    1940s
  • savvy
    ( n ) Brains, intelligence Ask Jean-Phillippe; he has a lot of savvy when it comes to car engines.
    1930s
  • sawbuck
    ( n ) 10-dollar bill. Give me a sawbuck til Friday, Lionel, I'm flat broke.
    1850s
  • Say my name!
    ( int ) A threatening An interjection. Say my name, you moron!
    1990s
  • Say what?
    ( int ) Are you serious. Malik got shot last night. Say what?!
    1950s
  • Says you!
    ( int ) An interjection of disbelief. It's going to rain tomorrow? Says you!
    1920s
  • scadoodle
    ( n ) Heap, large amount. See if you can't get some marbles from Enrico; he has scadoodles of them.
    1860s
  • scads
    ( n ) Heap, large amount. I heard LaVerne has scads of money.
    1860s
  • scag
    ( n ) An ugly female (offensive). He was seen last night in a sketchy part of town with a scag.
    1930s
  • scalp
    ( v ) To sell for a much higher price than expected. He scalped all the tickets for the World Series that he had.
    1970s
  • scam
    ( n ) A swindle, a con. Don't lose your money in some kind of scam.
    1960s
  • scam
    ( v ) To swindle or cheat. Some con artist scammed him out of his tuition money.
    1960s
  • scarf (down)
    ( v ) Devour, eat quickly. Since he hadn't eaten in a week, he scarfed down everything on his plate.
    1970s
  • scene
    ( n ) A scandal, uproar. She caused a scene at the restaurant when she was served cold coffee.
    1760s
  • scene
    ( n ) Where it is happening. I have to make that scene: all the cool cats will be there.
    1960s
  • scenester
    ( n ) Someone who is always where it is happening. He is such a scenester he never gets any studying done.
    1980s
  • schmuck
    ( n ) A jerk. What a stupid schmuck.
    1890s
  • school
    ( v ) To teach someone a lesson. Man, give me that ball, I'm going to school you!
    1590s
  • scooby doos
    ( n ) Good shoes. I need a pair of scooby doos before I can go out dancing.
    2000s
  • scoop
    ( n ) An alert on a good news story. Rhoda Book always gets scoops on the honeymoon of the Hollywood stars.
    1870s
  • scoot
    ( v ) To leave, go. Wow! Is it that late? I have to scoot.
    1750s
  • scope
    ( v ) Look at, examine, ogle. Hey, scope the hunk and his friend over there.
    1980s
  • scope out
    ( v ) Look at, examine, ogle. Hey, scope out that blond over there.
    1970s
  • score
    ( v ) Get, buy or steal. Go score some drinks.
    1960s
  • score
    ( v ) To have sex with. He said he scored with her but she says he never got to first base.
    1960s
  • Score!
    ( int ) An interjection of celebration. You got an A? Score!.
    1980s
  • scot free
    ( ap ) Without any penalty or damage at all. The rest of us had to pay a fine but Matilda got off scot free.
    1530s
  • scrag
    ( v ) To kill. Maxi got scragged in a car accident
    1930s
  • scram
    ( v ) To leave. You're getting on my nerves, so. scram!
    1920s
  • scrap
    ( n ) A fight. He got into a scrap with a motorcycle gang and had his nose bitten off.
    1840s
  • scrap
    ( v ) Cancel. We had to scrap plans to go to the beach when we saw the weather report.
    1900s
  • scrap
    ( v ) To fight. He's a well-intended boy but he scraps with the neighborhood kids too much.
    1870s
  • scratch
    ( n ) Money. I need a burger; does anyone have any scratch?
    1910s
  • scratch off
    ( v ) Screech your tires pulling out. Nathan just left; I heard him scratching off.
    1950s
  • scream
    ( v ) Go fast. He has a screaming rod, man.
    1960s
  • screamer
    ( n ) A hot rod. His new wheels are a real screamer.
    1960s
  • screw
    ( v ) To harm greatly. He got screwed by a used-car dealer.
    1900s
  • screw
    ( v ) To have sex with. [Use your imagination].
    1930s
  • screw around
    ( v ) To have love affairs. [Use your imagination].
    1970s
  • screw around
    ( v ) Waste time. If you screw around all day at this work, you will have to come back again.
    1970s
  • screw up
    ( v ) To make a mistake, error. He screwed up when he bought that car.
    1940s
  • screwup
    ( n ) A mistake, error. His marriage turned out to be one great screwup.
    1950s
  • scrill
    ( n ) Money. I'm short on scrill: could you help me til Friday?
    2000s
  • scrilla
    ( n ) Money. Yo, man, what's up with that scrilla you owe me?
    2000s
  • scrooch
    ( v ) To shrink or tighten up. Scrootch up, everyone, we have to fit one more person in the car.
    1880s
  • scrooched
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. You came home totally scrooched last night; don't ever talk to me again.
    1920s
  • scrub
    ( n ) A dirty looking object or person. Man, I'm not hanging with those scrubs.
    1990s
  • scrub
    ( v ) Cancel. We decided to scrub the trip when we saw the weather report.
    1820s
  • scrubby
    ( adj ) Dirty, grimy. She's so scrubby.
    1990s
  • scum
    ( n ) A worthless, repulsive person. Policemen have to deal with the scum of the earth.
    1580s
  • scumbag
    ( n ) A worthless, repulsive person. The scumbag took my sister out to dinner and made her pay for the meal.
    1970s
  • scurvy
    ( adj ) Worthless, repulsive. That girl in the sloppy sweater sure is scurvy.
    1990s
  • scuzz
    ( n ) A worthless, repulsive person. Don't hang around with scuzz like her; you will get in trouble.
    1960s
  • scuzz-bag
    ( n ) A worthless, repulsive person. Velma is the worst scuzz-bag I've ever known.
    1980s
  • scuzz-bucket
    ( n ) A worthless, repulsive person. I think Red is a scuzz-bucket who drives a scuzz-bucket.
    1980s
  • scuzzball
    ( n ) A worthless, repulsive person. Todd is nothing but a scuzzball who will stab you in the back.
    1980s
  • scuzzy
    ( adj ) Worthless, repulsive. He bought the car from some scuzzy guy who probably stole it.
    1960s
  • section
    ( v ) To lowered a car by removing a section through the body. He sectioned his hotrod and, boy, is it cool now.
    1960s
  • see the dinosaur
    ( v ) To completely misunderstand. If you don't explain it to her she's just going to see the dinosaur.
    1990s
  • See you later, alligator
    ( int ) Good-bye. See you later, alligator. (After while, crocodile.).
    1950s
  • seed
    ( n ) A child, offspring. She took her seed with her to class?
    1990s
  • sell buicks
    ( v ) To vomit. Todd sold his buicks in the bathtub.
    1990s
  • sell out
    ( v ) To betray someone. He wouldn't sell me out; he's my closest friend.
    1940s
  • send packing
    ( vp ) To fire. He fingered the boss's secretary and they sent him packing.
    1820s
  • senior moment
    ( np ) Something causing forgetfulness. She had a senior moment and put the remote control in her purse instead of her mobile phone.
    1990s
  • set
    ( n ) A series of good waves in surfing. Man, did I catch a great set this morning.
    1970s
  • sex-pot
    ( n ) A sexy or seductive woman. She thinks she is a sex pot when she wears those low-cut blouses.
    1950s
  • shack
    ( v ) To sleep at someone else's house. I was toast so I shacked at Bob's last night.
    1980s
  • shack up
    ( v ) To sleep with someone at a hotel or motel. Claudia shacked up with her husband's business partner.
    1920s
  • shacker
    ( n ) Someone who frequently sleeps at someone else's house. Lizzy is such a shacker; I don't know why she has an apartment.
    1990s
  • shades
    ( n ) Sunglasses. Did you buy some new shades?
    1970s
  • shady
    ( adj ) Suspicious, not quite honest. He got in trouble hanging out with some shady characters in the pool hall.
    1860s
  • shaft
    ( n ) A double-cross. I sent her out to buy a car but she gave me the shaft and skipped with the money.
    1950s
  • shaft
    ( v ) To double-cross. I was shafted by best friend!
    1950s
  • shag ass
    ( v ) To leave. This library sucks; let's shag ass.
    1950s
  • shagadellic
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. What a show! It was totally shagadellic!
    1990s
  • shake the spot
    ( vp ) To take the center of attention. Casey really shook the spot at Tiffany's birthday party last night.
    1990s
  • shammered
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He went to the bar and got shammered last night.
    1990s
  • shank
    ( n ) Crudely made knife. They caught him with a shank and gave him 5 more years in prison.
    1960s
  • sharp
    ( n ) An expert. He was taken in by a couple of card sharps who drifted into town.
    1840s
  • sharp
    ( adj ) Attractive or appealing. Who was the sharp guy I saw her out with last weekend?
    1950s
  • sharp
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. I've heard the new night club is really sharp.
    1940s
  • sharp
    ( adj ) Smart, intelligent. He is very sharp with numbers.
    1690s
  • shasta
    ( adj ) Unattractive (female). She's is so shasta no good-looking airhead is interested in her.
    1990s
  • Sheba
    ( n ) A sexy or seductive woman. She is just the Sheba I've been waiting for.
    1920s
  • shebang
    ( n ) A set of facts or things. Baldwin sold the store, the stock, the grounds--the whole shebang.
    1860s
  • sheik
    ( n ) A sexy man. Who is the sheik I saw her with last Friday?
    1920s
  • sheisty
    ( adj ) Questionable, unacceptable. The fries they give you in the caf are hella sheisty.
    1990s
  • shell
    ( and ) Crazy, insane. That waitress with the greasy purple hair and orange lipstick is definitely shell!
    1990s
  • shell out
    ( v ) To pay unwillingly. I had to shell out $220 for a new water pump on my car.
    1810s
  • shife
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. His new kicks are definitely shife.
    1990s
  • shifty
    ( adj ) Deceitful, untrustworthy. The guy is too shifty for me; I don't like him.
    1830s
  • shine
    ( v ) To deceive or gull. Don't try to shine me, man; I've been there.
    1960s
  • shite
    ( v ) To make a mistake, error. He shites the ball and misses the shot.
    1990s
  • shite
    ( adj ) Worthless, disgusting. It was a shite situation I just wanted to get out of.
    1990s
  • shiv
    ( n ) A knife. If you are popular, why do you think you have to keep a shiv in your pocket all the time?
    1920s
  • shiznit
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. It was a shiznit party last night.
    2000s
  • shiznit
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. Ridnour is shiznit on the free-throw line.
    2000s
  • shizzle
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. Did you see Dudley play last night? He was the shizzle of the game.
    1990s
  • shizzy
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. Marlin thinks he is hella shizzy with his new wheels.
    1990s
  • shlong
    ( n ) The male organ. [Use your imagination].
    1970s
  • shoot down
    ( v ) To reject. Everyone shot down my idea.
    1950s
  • shoot from the hip
    ( vp ) To talk without thinking. He always shoots from the hip and regrets it later.
    1960s
  • shoot hoops
    ( vp ) Play basketball. Let's shoot some hoops during lunch break.
    1970s
  • Shoot!
    ( int ) An interjection of disappointment (euphemism for s - - -). Shoot! I just ripped my pants.
    1930s
  • short
    ( n ) A street car. He used to ride the shorts to work.
    1910s
  • short
    ( n ) A car. He was trying to sell a hot short to a salesman on a car lot.
    1930s
  • shorty
    ( n ) An attractive female. Look at that sexy shorty over there.
    1990s
  • shorty
    ( n ) Girl friend. My shorty doesn't want to go to the dance this weekend.
    2000s
  • shot
    ( n ) A try, turn, go. I'll give the puzzle another shot.
    1940s
  • shot
    ( adj ) Tired, exhausted; worn out, broken down. I can't go anywhere tonight: me and my car are shot.
    1930s
  • shot
    ( n ) A swallow or single portion. Hey, give me a shot of that stuff you're drinking.
    1920s
  • shotgun
    ( n ) A place of honor in the front seat of a car beside the driver. Why do you always get to ride shotgun? It's my turn!
    1950s
  • shotgun wedding
    ( np ) A wedding forced by pregnancy. The marriage didn't last because it started out in a shotgun wedding.
    1930s
  • shove
    ( v ) Keep (contemptuous rejection). You can take your job and shove it.
    1940s
  • shuck
    ( v ) To cheat or deceive. Don't try to shuck me with your jive talk, man; I know what you're up to.
    1950s
  • shucked
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He came home shucked and his wife locked him out.
    1950s
  • shuckster
    ( n ) A deceiver, liar, or cheat. I've learned my lesson: never buy a car from a shuckster.
    1950s
  • shut-eye
    ( n ) Sleep. I've been working all day long; I have to get some shut-eye.
    1940s
  • shysty
    ( adj ) Slick, sly, or devious. That was really shysty of you to jack his dictionary.
    1990s
  • sicko
    ( n ) A pervert. This guy who cuts off puppy-dog tails is a sicko.
    1970s
  • sicko
    ( adj ) Perverted. This guy who cuts off puppy-dog tails is sicko.
    1970s
  • side
    ( n ) A vinyl record. He has a great collection of sides at home.
    1950s
  • side-kick
    ( n ) Someone who always accompanies someone else. You never see Pedro without his side-kick, Manuel.
    1900s
  • sig
    ( v ) To spend time talking. Stop sigging, it's time to hit the books.
    1990s
  • simoleon
    ( n ) A dollar. I don't have a simoleon to my name.
    1890s
  • simp
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. That simp doesn't know how to tie his shoes!
    1910s
  • sing
    ( v ) To inform or tattle. If Malcolm sings to the cops, they'll get us all.
    1940s
  • sinker
    ( n ) A doughnut. Hey, Joe! Give me a cup of joe and a couple of those week-old sinkers over there.
    1920s
  • skank
    ( n ) An ugly female (offensive). Check out that nasty skank over there.
    1980s
  • skanky
    ( adj ) Ugly, nasty. She is a little bit skanky but nothing you can't deal with.
    1970s
  • skeevy
    ( adj ) Shady, unsavory, icky. This club looks a little skeevy to me; let's go somewhere else.
    1990s
  • skeezer
    ( n ) An unattractive, promiscuous female (offensive). I don't see what you see in that skeezer.
    1990s
  • sketch
    ( n ) A questionable person. Don't hang around with sketches like her; they will get you in trouble.
    1980s
  • sketchy
    ( adj ) Questionable. Sketchy people hang out in the hood at night.
    1970s
  • skiddoo
    ( v ) To leave. Come on, kiddo, time for us to skiddoo.
    1900s
  • skidoo
    ( v ) To leave. Come on, kiddo, time for us to skidoo.
    1900s
  • skin
    ( v ) To swindle or cheat. Derwin got skinned in the land development deal.
    1810s
  • skin
    ( v ) Cheat by copying on an exam. Marvin skinned the answers on the existentialism exam by looking into the soul of the girl sitting next to him.
    1830s
  • skin
    ( v ) Cheat out of something. Ben Dover got skinned by a con man who sold him some real estate in Utah.
    1810s
  • skinner
    ( n ) A policeman. The skinner took us to the police station.
    1990s
  • skinny
    ( adj ) Greedy; selfish. Taking the last cookie was a hella skinny thing to do.
    1990s
  • skinny
    ( n ) Information. Hey, what's the skinny on Murphy.
    1960s
  • skip
    ( v ) To leave with someone in pursuit. She took the money and skipped town.
    1940s
  • skip
    ( v ) To miss, to not attend. Let's skip chemistry today and go to the library.
    1930s
  • skippy
    ( adj ) OK, alright. Is everything skippy here?
    1990s
  • skirt
    ( n ) A girl or a woman. Hey, Rube, take a gander at the legs on that skirt over there.
    1950s
  • skootchie
    ( n ) An ugly female (offensive). Her date is just a tired old skootchie.
    1990s
  • skunk
    ( v ) To fail to meet an obligation. He skunked the restaurant after complaining about the meal.
    1850s
  • skunk
    ( v ) To hold scoreless. We skunked them 5-0 in baseball.
    1940s
  • skunk
    ( v ) To swindle or cheat. Mortimer skunked Phil out of $5.
    1890s
  • slammer
    ( n ) Jail or prison. The police threw them both in the slammer.
    1950s
  • slamming
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. I saw her at the game in a totally slamming outfit!
    1980s
  • slap-happy
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. Roland has been slap-happy ever since he left the ring.
    1930s
  • slave
    ( n ) A job, particularly a new job. Yo, home boy, I just got me a new slave.
    1990s
  • slay
    ( phr ) Be very funny. What a story! You just slay me, Ferdie!
    1920s
  • sleep around
    ( v ) To have love affairs. I hear Natalie sleeps around a lot.
    1920s
  • sleep with
    ( v ) To have sex with. Morgan says that he has never slept with anybody.
    1000s
  • slew
    ( n ) A large number, many. We saw a slew of crappies at the west end of the lake this weekend.
    1830s
  • slick
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Isn't his Vette slick?
    1830s
  • slug
    ( v ) To hit. Don't talk to me that way unless you want to be slugged in the chops.
    1940s
  • slum
    ( v ) To go to a bad side of town. So what brings you to this side of town? Are you slumming?
    1920s
  • slummy
    ( adj ) Like the slums. I am living straight slummy since the rents stopped sending me money.
    1990s
  • slush fund
    ( np ) Money for questionable activities. Robin Banks has a slush fund for his private parties on the company yacht.
    1870s
  • slut
    ( n ) A promiscuous female. She is a slut who makes it with all the guys.
    1400s
  • smack
    ( n ) Heroine. He was so high on smack he didn't know what he was doing!
    1960s
  • smack
    ( v ) To hit or slap. She smacked him in the chops when he insulted her.
    1830s
  • smack
    ( v ) To kiss. And then she smacked him right on the lips.
    1570s
  • smarts
    ( n ) Brains, intelligence. Roy is good-looking and has a lot of smarts.
    1970s
  • smashed
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. Try not to get smashed at the beer party.
    1960s
  • smoke
    ( n ) Cigarette. Do you have some smokes?
    1880s
  • smoke
    ( v ) To kill. The mob didn't like him muscling in on their territory, so they smoked him.
    1920s
  • smoke out
    ( v ) Force out, make come out. The cops smoked the shooter out of the house with tear gas.
    1940s
  • smoke-eater
    ( n ) Fireman. My father is a smoke eater.
    1990s
  • smokey
    ( n ) Highway patrolman. I would have been here sooner the but the smokies were out in force.
    1970s
  • smooch
    ( v ) To hug and kiss. I guess they are going steady; I saw them smooching on the porch last night.
    1940s
  • smoother
    ( n ) Someone who can persuade. Watch out for James; he's a smoother and always gets his way.
    1990s
  • snafu
    ( n ) A mistake, error. Sending your gripe to everyone in the company was a major snafu.
    1950s
  • snap
    ( n ) Something easy. Mowing our lawn in an hour is a snap.
    1870s
  • snaps
    ( n ) Money. I'm low on snaps; can you loan me twenty?
    1990s
  • snarf
    ( v ) Gulp, gobble, swallow whole Ted snarfed down the hamburger as though he hadn't eaten in a month.
    1950s
  • snarky
    ( adj ) Irritable, short-tempered. Don't be so snarky; I only asked a question.
    1900s
  • snazzy
    ( adj ) Smart, stylish, nice looking. Did you see that snazzy new car Sue Barew is driving around in?
    1930s
  • snockered
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. Baldwin was so snockered, he couldn't find the bathroom.
    1950s
  • snooker
    ( v ) To cheat or deceive. I don't know how I got snookered into referring the game.
    1950s
  • snookums
    ( n ) Female term of endearment. Hello, snookums, how did your day go?
    1910s
  • snoopy
    ( n ) A date. Yo, Christie and I are going to have a snoopy Friday night.
    1990s
  • snoot
    ( n ) Nose. She popped him on the snoot.
    1930s
  • snow
    ( v ) To make someone adore you. Olga has Percy snowed; he can't live without her.
    1950s
  • snuff
    ( v ) To hit; to punch. He snuffed me when I turned around to walk away!
    1980s
  • snuff
    ( v ) To kill. He ratted on the mob and they snuffed him.
    1960s
  • So what?
    ( int ) I don't care. So, Nellie got into Smith. So what?.
    1930s
  • sock it to
    ( vp ) To do something (unpleasant) to someone. The IRS really socked it to Margie's father.
    1960s
  • solid
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That bash at her house was solid!
    1930s
  • something else
    ( np ) Excellent, outstanding. That new dance is something else.
    1960s
  • sosh
    ( n ) A person who is stuck-up, snooty. She is such a sosh, with all her money.
    1990s
  • sounds
    ( n ) Music. When you come tonight, bring some sounds.
    1980s
  • soup up
    ( v ) Increase the power and speed of a car. Sure, he wins the drag races: his car is souped up.
    1930s
  • souse
    ( n ) A drunk. All I saw coming home was a couple of souses lying on the sidewalk in front of the bar.
    1940s
  • soused
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He came home soused and his wife locked him out.
    1930s
  • southpaw
    ( n ) A left-hander. Johnny Batts can't hit a southpaw pitcher.
    1880s
  • space out
    ( v ) To detach (oneself) from reality. Dan is so spaced out he doesn't know what planet he is on.
    1960s
  • spacey
    ( adj ) Eccentric, odd, peculiar. I'm not sure she can handle the job; she's a little spacey.
    1960s
  • spang
    ( v ) To ask for spare change. I'm so broke I'm going to have to spang somebody for lunch money.
    1990s
  • spanking
    ( adv ) Very. He was in some spanking fine kicks!
    1880s
  • spark
    ( v ) Hug and kiss. I saw ma and pa out sparking on the front porch swing.
    1800s
  • spark
    ( n ) Elegantly dressed young man or a boyfriend. Manuel Override thinks he's quite the spark at school.
    1600s
  • speakeasy
    ( n ) An illicit bar selling bootleg liquor. Ebenezer ran a speakeasy until the cops discovered it and broke it up.
    1920s
  • sped
    ( n ) A moron (offensive). Don't tell that sped anything; he'll tell the world.
    1970s
  • speedo
    ( n ) Speedometer. The speedo was showing 35 mph but we seemed to be going much faster.
    1930s
  • Speedos
    ( n ) Men's tight-fitting swimming trunks. When he entered the water, his Speedos shrunk and had to be removed surgically.
    1980s
  • spent
    ( adj ) Tired, exhausted. I played ball all day; I'm spent.
    1590s
  • spew
    ( v ) To vomit. He barely made it to his car, then spewed through the sun roof.
    1940s
  • spew one's guts out
    ( v ) To tell everything one knows. When the cops picked him up, he spewed his guts out.
    1940s
  • spifflicated
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. You're so spifflicated you can barely walk; you certainly can't drive.
    1920s
  • spiffy
    ( adj ) Dressed up. What a spiffy pair of shoes you have on, Roland.
    1850s
  • spit and image
    ( np ) An identical copy. Rodney is the spit and image of his father.
    1890s
  • spit nails
    ( vp ) To get angry, mad. He was spitting nails over the damage to his bike.
    1970s
  • spitball
    ( v ) To guess, estmate. Can you spitball the crowd at the concert last night.
    2000s
  • spiv
    ( n ) Slick con man. Some worthless spiv married Myrtle, took her money, and left her.
    1930s
  • spivvy
    ( adj ) Dressed up. (See spiffy, too) Boy, don't we look spivvy today?
    1940s
  • spliff
    ( n ) A marijuana cigarette. They raided his crib and found a bunch of spliffs.
    1990s
  • split
    ( v ) To leave. It is time to split and go see the movie.
    1950s
  • sponge
    ( n ) A parasite. You are such a sponge. Why don't you get a job?
    1670s
  • sponge
    ( n ) One big need. That girl is my only sponge now.
    1990s
  • sponge
    ( v ) To live like a parasite off others. He sponged off his brother for two years.
    1670s
  • sponger
    ( n ) A parasite. You are such a sponger. Why don't you get a job?
    1680s
  • spoogy
    ( adj ) Wet, damp, sticky. The weather today is sort of spoogy.
    1990s
  • spook
    ( n ) A spy. Word has it, Melvin was a spook for the CIA in his youth.
    1940s
  • spook
    ( v ) To frighten. The cows were spooked by the howling of the wolves.
    1940s
  • spook
    ( v ) To scare, frighten. A snake spooked the horse and he threw his rider.
    1930s
  • spoon
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That movie was spoon.
    1980s
  • spoon
    ( v ) To hug and kiss. They love to spoon by the moonlight.
    1880s
  • sport
    ( n ) A liberal, understanding guy. Rodney's a good sport; he won't tell on us.
    2000s
  • spot
    ( v ) To loan. Could you spot me $10 until payday?
    1930s
  • spring
    ( v ) Let out, let loose. Somehow he got sprung from jail.
    1940s
  • spring (for)
    ( v ) To pay for. It is my turn to spring for the doughnuts.
    1950s
  • spruce off
    ( v ) To avoid a duty by deception. Mike Hunt will tell you he is going to do something then spruce off just when you need it done.
    1910s
  • spruce up
    ( v ) To dress up. Reilly doesn't look so hot until he gets spruced up.
    1670s
  • sprung
    ( adj ) Obsessed with. Vanessa's so sprung on Todd, he's all she talks about.
    1990s
  • spud
    ( n ) Potato. Do you want rice or spuds for dinner?
    1840s
  • spumoni
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. That new dress is spumoni!
    1990s
  • spunk up
    ( v ) To stand up to, assert oneself. Don't be afraid of him; spunk up to him.
    1850s
  • squad car
    ( np ) Police car. There is no way out; the house is surrounded by squad cars.
    1930s
  • square
    ( n ) An old-fashioned person. Good grief, Lloyd, are your parents squares!
    1960s
  • square
    ( n ) Cigarette. Hey man, you got any squares on you?
    1990s
  • square
    ( adj ) Old-fashioned, not cool. My father looks square in his jacket.
    1960s
  • squat
    ( n ) A small, worthless amount Farnsworth doesn't know squat about women.
    1970s
  • squat
    ( n ) A small, worthless amount. Farnsworth doesn't know squat about women.
    1970s
  • squeaker
    ( n ) A close game. We won, but it was a squeaker.
    1960s
  • squeal
    ( v ) To inform or tattle. He squealed on his buddies and got them in trouble.
    1840s
  • squeeze
    ( n ) Girlfriend. Brady's new squeeze looks terrific!
    1980s
  • squeeze
    ( v ) To put pressure on someone. Don't try to put the squeeze on me, buddy; I don't squeeze easily.
    1700s
  • squeeze
    ( n ) Girlfriend. Stay away from Maisy, man; she's Percy's main squeeze.
    1980s
  • squeeze
    ( v ) To pressure, blackmail. How can we squeeze some money out of your 'rents?
    1880s
  • squirrel
    ( n ) An attractive female. Check out that squirrel over there.
    1980s
  • squirrel
    ( n ) The female genitalia. [Use your imagination].
    1950s
  • squirt
    ( n ) Petty, immature brat. That little squirt still doesn't know his right hand from his left.
    1840s
  • stack it
    ( v ) To fall over. Hannah stacked it again last night on those heels she wears.
    1990s
  • stack up
    ( v ) To wreck. He's already stacked up two cars and his dad isn't giving him the dough to buy a third.
    1960s
  • stacked
    ( adj ) Having a nice female figure. She was polite, pretty, and really stacked.
    1940s
  • stand up
    ( v ) To not show up for a date. Hortense said that she would meet me for dinner but she stood me up.
    1900s
  • steady
    ( n ) Boyfriend or girlfriend. Natalie's steady is a hunk who works as a lifeguard at the beach.
    1920s
  • steam up
    ( v ) To excite, agitate. They tried without success to steam up his courage.
    1910s
  • steam up
    ( v ) To make angry, mad. Don't get so steamed up over the issue.
    1920s
  • step
    ( v ) To back away, back off. You better step before you get in trouble!
    1990s
  • step off
    ( v ) To back away, back off. You better step off before you get in trouble!
    1980s
  • stick
    ( v ) Force someone to do something unpleasant. He left early and stuck me with cleaning up the house.
    1930s
  • stick
    ( v ) Keep (contemptuous rejection). You can take your job and stick it.
    1920s
  • Stick 'em up!
    ( phr ) Raise your hands. Drop that gun and stick 'em up!
    1920s
  • stick around
    ( v ) Stay. The atmosphere was cozy, so I decided to stick around for a while.
    1940s
  • stick up
    ( v ) To rob at gun point. He stuck up a grocery store and got caught.
    1880s
  • stick-up
    ( n ) An armed robbery. I was in the liquor store when the stick-up took place.
    1880s
  • stickleroo
    ( n ) A cool person; a hip person. Why don't you go out with Jason? He's a stickleroo!
    1990s
  • sticks
    ( n ) Way out in the country. Delbert lives somewhere way out in the sticks.
    1940s
  • stiff
    ( n ) A corpse. They took the stiff to the morgue.
    1860s
  • stiff
    ( v ) To leave the bill for someone else to pay. He invited me out then stiffed me with the bill.
    1950s
  • stink
    ( np ) A scandal, uproar. The citizens made a big stink about the new nuclear power station.
    1850s
  • stir
    ( n ) Prison. Stay away from Booger, man; he just got our of stir.
    1960s
  • stir-crazy
    ( adj ) Crazy for being cooped up. I'm getting stir-crazy lying in bed all day .
    1900s
  • stog
    ( n ) Cigarette. Give me a drag on that stog, man.
    1980s
  • stoke
    ( v ) To excite. Nothing stokes me like a good basketball game.
    1960s
  • stomp
    ( v ) Dilute drugs. By the time the dealers stomp the drugs, they hardly give you a buzz.
    1960s
  • stone
    ( n ) A slow car. Anyone can outdrag him in that stone he drives.
    1990s
  • stone
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. She is a stone fox, man.
    1970s
  • stoned
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He was too stoned from beer to walk down the stairs.
    1970s
  • stoned
    ( adj ) High on drugs. Three guys at the party were stoned.
    1960s
  • stool pigeon
    ( np ) A squealer, tattletale. Jeremiah works for the police as a stool pigeon for years.
    1840s
  • straight
    ( adj ) Heterosexual, not gay. He is straight but a lot of his friends are gay.
    1960s
  • straight
    ( adj ) Honest. Abner is as straight as an arrow; he would never even stretch the truth.
    1530s
  • straight
    ( adj ) Truthful. That's straight, man; she cancelled the final!
    1950s
  • straight
    ( adj ) Without ice. He was surprised to see her drink her whiskey straight.
    1910s
  • straight out
    ( adv ) Directly. Tell me straight out if you are seeing another woman.
    1970s
  • straight up
    ( adv ) Directly. Tell me straight up: do you love me.
    1980s
  • straight up
    ( adj ) Without ice. He drinks his scotch straight up.
    1940s
  • street-walker
    ( n ) A prostitute of the streets. He married a common street-walker.
    1590s
  • stressed
    ( adj ) Upset. I am really stressed by all the recent world events.
    1970s
  • stretch
    ( n ) A term, especially in prison. My brudda did a stretch in Attica for kissing an on-duty police officer.
    1820s
  • struggle buggy
    ( np ) The backseat of a car. The struggle buggy is a parent's worst nightmare.
    1920s
  • stuck on
    ( adj ) To be in love with. I think Arnold is stuck on his secretary.
    1920s
  • stuck up
    ( adj ) Conceited. She is so stuck-up that she wouldn't be caught dead in a MacDonald's.
    1820s
  • stud
    ( n ) A well-built man. Say, Serafima, who is that stud you are talking to?
    1960s
  • stud
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. It was a stud performance.
    1970s
  • stuff
    ( v ) Keep (contemptuous rejection). You can take your job and stuff it.
    1950s
  • stupe
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. Don't tell that stupe anything; he'll spill the beans to anyone who asks.
    1820s
  • style
    ( n ) Someone you flirt with. She's just a style a play around with; nothing serious.
    1990s
  • style
    ( v ) To flirt. Where's Joe? Over there, styling that girl in the red shirt.
    1990s
  • styler
    ( n ) Someone excellent at flirting. Mike's too much of a styler to want to commit.
    1990s
  • suck
    ( v ) To be bad. You got a D on math? That sucks!
    1960s
  • suck face
    ( v ) To French kiss. Bradley is such a romantic: he keeps asking me if I want to suck face with him.
    1980s
  • suck in
    ( v ) To con. Don't let yourself be sucked in by her lies.
    1850s
  • sucker
    ( n ) A person easily conned or deceived. Don't be a sucker; buy your car from someone you know.
    1830s
  • sucker
    ( v ) To swindle or cheat by deceit. He suckered me into dating his sister.
    1840s
  • sucky
    ( adj ) Bad, no good. Bucky can't go to the beach this weekend. That's sucky!
    1990s
  • sugar daddy
    ( np ) A rich man who supports a female. Daddy Warbucks was Little Orphan Annie's sugar daddy.
    1940s
  • suicide knob
    ( np ) A knob on your steering wheel. When he hit the curb, the steering wheel spun around and the suicide knob knocked him out.
    1950s
  • supertight
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That party last night was supertight.
    1980s
  • surreal
    ( adj ) Unusual. You have to listen to her sing; her voice is surreal.
    2000s
  • swag
    ( n ) Stolen goods or money. The robbers were caught red-handed with the swag still in their possession.
    1790s
  • swanky
    ( adj ) Luxurious. They spent the night in a swanky hotel with a ritzy restaurant on the top floor.
    1920s
  • swap spit
    ( vp ) To kiss. He is so romantic, always asking me if I want to swap spit with him.
    1980s
  • sweat
    ( v ) To put pressure on. This guys been asking me for my digits all night; he's really sweating me.
    1960s
  • sweat
    ( v ) To worry. Don't sweat it; we'll finish on time.
    1950s
  • sweat box
    ( np ) A small club. She sings in a sweat box in the Village.
    1990s
  • sweet
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. He found a really sweet job the other day.
    1940s
  • sweetie
    ( n ) A term of affection for a female. Check out the sweetie by the bar.
    1920s
  • swell
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Thanks for helping out, Eula, you're really swell.
    1920s
  • swerved
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. I got swerved on those margaritas last night.
    1990s
  • swig
    ( v ) Drink, gulp, swallow. Mojo took a swig of Gatorade and flew out of the gym.
    1620s
  • swigger
    ( n ) A drinker. Mojo was a heavy swigger in his youth.
    1940s
  • swing
    ( v ) Exchange spouses with another couple for sex. When they were younger, Millicent and her husband swung with their neighbors.
    1960s
  • swinger
    ( v ) Someone who exchanges his or her spouse for someone else's for sex. Rodney is so uptight he thinks kissing someone else's wife is swinging.
    1960s
  • swinging
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That song was really swinging.
    1970s
  • swinging
    ( adj ) Full of jazz or the latest music. I like to go to a swinging club on weekends.
    1950s
  • switch hitter
    ( n ) A homosexual. He's definitely a switch hitter.
    1970s
  • swoll
    ( adj ) Angry, mad. I was really swoll when they left me!
    1990s
  • swoll
    ( n ) Muscle. Ephraim lifted weights until he had big swolls.
    1990s
  • swoop up
    ( vp ) To pick up. Swoop me up for school in the morning.
    1990s
  • swot (up)
    ( v ) To study hard. I have to swot all night for my Russian test tomorrow.
    1860s

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