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Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

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131 Results in T (You are getting Clean results. Get Full Results for "T")

  • T-bucket
    ( n ) A hot rod made from a Model T Ford. He drives a very sano T-bucket.
    1960s
  • tad
    ( n ) A little. He is a tad up-tight tonight.
    1950s
  • tag along
    ( vp ) Come with. Mind if I tag along for the ride?
    1930s
  • tail
    ( v ) To follow. Quentin tailed his sister to the boy's house.
    1900s
  • take
    ( n ) Stolen goods or money. The take from the robbery was 35 cents and an expired credit card.
    1880s
  • take
    ( v ) To swindle or cheat. He was taken for all his money at the casino.
    1920s
  • take a gander
    ( vp ) Look at, examine. Take a gander at that hunk standing by the door.
    1940s
  • take a hike
    ( v ) To leave. I am tired of all your complaining. Take a hike!
    1930s
  • take a powder
    ( v ) To leave. Look, if you don't like it here, take a powder.
    1940s
  • take for a ride
    ( vp ) To drive someone away to kill. The capo ordered that the informer be taken for a ride.
    1920s
  • take out
    ( v ) To kill. The don ordered his own son taken out.
    1960s
  • talk trash
    ( vp ) To spend time talking. We spent the whole afternoon talking trash and watching TV.
    1970s
  • tank
    ( n ) A large sedan (usually driven by parents). You should see the tank her dad drives.
    1950s
  • tanked
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. Lloyd was so tanked he tied his shoes together and fell off the balcony.
    1960s
  • tanked up
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. Guy was so tanked up last night that he couldn't find his way home.
    1890s
  • tap
    ( adj ) Exhaust, finish. This party's tapped, I'm kicking it.
    1990s
  • tap
    ( v ) To deprive of money. Can you loan me $5 till Friday? I'm completely tapped (out).
    1940s
  • tat
    ( n ) A tattoo. Lyda Caine has some really tricked out tats on her arms.
    2000s
  • tat
    ( v ) To tattoo. Skinny Williams has a radically tatted bod
    2000s
  • taxed
    ( adj ) Expensive, overpriced. Oh, snap! That stuff is taxed!
    1990s
  • teach
    ( n ) A Teacher. She isn't such a bad teach.
    1950s
  • tear
    ( v ) Move fast. She tore up the street when she heard her boyfriend was there.
    1850s
  • tear up
    ( v ) To upset. She was torn up over losing her boyfriend.
    1950s
  • tear-ass
    ( v ) Drive (or go) very fast. He dropped a water balloon then tore-ass down the hall.
    1950s
  • tearjerker
    ( n ) Sentimental story or movie. The TV series "Touched by an Angel" was a real tearjerker.
    1920s
  • tee off
    ( v ) Make mad. She really teed me off when she told me she couldn't go out because she had to wash her hair.
    1960s
  • terminate
    ( v ) To kill. Rat on the mob? Are you crazy? I don't want to be terminated in my youth.
    1950s
  • The bank is closed
    ( phr ) No kissing or hugging. I like you, Mac, but tonight the bank's closed.
    1920s
  • the berries
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. You have to see the new exhibit at the art museum; it's the berries.
    1920s
  • the big house
    ( np ) Federal prison. Grannis served 10 years in the big house.
    1940s
  • the bird
    ( n ) The raised middle finger. The little twerp gives you the bird if anything displeases him.
    1970s
  • the boondocks
    ( np ) Way out in the country. Greta married some yahoo from the boondocks.
    1970s
  • the boonies
    ( np ) Way out in the country. Greta married some yahoo from the boonies.
    1980s
  • the finger
    ( n ) The raised middle finger. The little twit gave me the finger when I asked him for a light.
    1950s
  • the grail
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. His new board is the grail!
    1980s
  • the hair of the dog
    ( np ) A shot of an alcoholic drink to relieve a hangover. Wow, my head hurts! Give me a little hair of the dog that bit me and see if that helps.
    1920s
  • The jig is up.
    ( phr ) It's all over; we/you are done in. The jig is up! You don't work here any more.
    1800s
  • the man
    ( n ) A figure of authority. If you want to get along in this world, you have to listen to the man.
    1980s
  • the man
    ( n ) A policeman. If you don't straighten up and fly right, I'm going to call the man.
    1970s
  • the most
    ( n ) Excellent, outstanding. Thanks for all the help, Barry; you're the most.
    1950s
  • the real McCoy
    ( np ) Something genuine. That girl of his is not just good-looking; she's the real McCoy.
    1920s
  • the sack
    ( n ) Bed. It is time for me to hit the sack.
    1950s
  • the sticks
    ( np ) An isolated place in the country. Greta married some yahoo from the sticks.
    1940s
  • the word
    ( n ) The latest news or gossip. Say, what's the word on Jenny?
    1930s
  • there
    ( adj ) Liking or enjoying something. Everyone loves Star Trek. I'm so there; I love Spock.
    2000s
  • thick
    ( adj ) Close, tight. They are as thick as thieves.
    1900s
  • thick
    ( adj ) Stupid or foolish. He's so thick he thinks a capella means 'no guitars.'
    1960s
  • thick
    ( adj ) Well-built, having an attractive figure. Man, that girl is thick; I mean, look at those curves.
    1980s
  • thin ice
    ( np ) A precarious situation. The company is not bankrupt but it is (skating) on thin ice.
    1890s
  • thing
    ( n ) Favorite thing. What is your thing, man; I'm into crocheting.
    1960s
  • thing
    ( n ) Problem. What is your thing, man; I'm not bothering you.
    1970s
  • thingamabob
    ( n ) An object for which a name is unavailable. What was that thingamabob he was holding?
    1940s
  • thingamajig
    ( n ) An object for which a name is unavailable. What was that thingamajig he was holding?
    1930s
  • thirsty
    ( adj ) Exhibiting extreme desperation. He was so thirsty, he spent 6 hours on the internet looking for information.
    1990s
  • thong
    ( n ) Bikini underpants. Mandy's mother won't let her wear thongs.
    1980s
  • thong
    ( n ) Sandal with two straps that went between your big toe and the one next to it. The beach was so stony everyone has to wear thongs.
    1960s
  • threads
    ( n ) Clothes. Those look like expensive threads he is wearing.
    1960s
  • three on the tree
    ( np ) A car with 3-speed manual transmission with the shifter on the steering column. That old car is fast for wheels with three on a tree.
    1950s
  • through the wringer
    ( vp ) A chastising, a tough questioning. He came home potted last weekend and his wife ran him through the wringer.
    1940s
  • throw a bone
    ( vp ) Help out with something small. Look, if you make a lot of money, throw your old friend a bone.
    1930s
  • throw up
    ( v ) Vomit. I doubt he'll date her again; she threw up on his car seat on their last date.
    1730s
  • tickle
    ( n ) Something funny. That story about his brother is a hella tickle.
    1880s
  • tied to an apron string
    ( vp ) Dominated by the wife or a woman. Fred can't go fishing on the weekend; he's tied to his wife's apron string.
    1930s
  • tight
    ( adj ) Angry, mad. Your pop seems to be tight about something.
    1990s
  • tight
    ( adj ) Close. I'm tight with all my friends.
    1970s
  • tight
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. After the party he sure had a tight head.
    1950s
  • tight
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Boy, that new song you wrote is tight.
    1980s
  • tight-laced
    ( adj ) Priggish and tense. Oscar was too tight-laced to visit a hoochy-coochy club.
    1830s
  • tightass
    ( n ) Someone who is very particular, meticulous in following rules. That prof is such a tightass he won't let us out a day early.
    1960s
  • Tinsel Town
    ( np ) Hollywood. All the glitterati in Tinsel Town turn out for the Acadamy Awards.
    1960s
  • tip
    ( v ) To leave. Let's tip; this party's a drag.
    1990s
  • titanic
    ( adj ) Huge, gigantic. Man, that cop sure looks titanic.
    1990s
  • to be out of here
    ( vp ) To leave. Well, I have to write a paper tonight; I'm out of here.
    1970s
  • to the bricks
    ( pp ) In fine clothes. She came down dressed to the bricks and all he could do is stutter.
    1990s
  • to the max
    ( pp ) As much as possible. Wow! This is fun! Let's take it to the max!
    1980s
  • to the nines
    ( pp ) In fine clothes Seamus Allgood came to the party dressed to the nines.
    1700s
  • to the nines
    ( pp ) In fine clothes. Seamus Allgood came to the party dressed to the nines.
    1700s
  • to trip
    ( v ) Lose control of yourself under the influence of drugs. If you think I'm going to try dope, may, you're trippin'.
    1960s
  • toast
    ( n, adj ) In bad condition, ruined. I can't fix this car; it's toast.
    1990s
  • toasted
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. Let's get Benny home; he's toasted.
    1980s
  • tod
    ( adj ) Stupid, bad. That outfit is so tod.
    1990s
  • tog
    ( v ) To dress. My swing partner last night was togged to the bricks.
    1790s
  • togs
    ( n ) Clothes. Hey, what swell togs you're in!
    1770s
  • tomato
    ( n ) A female. That Shelly's one red hot tomato.
    1930s
  • tool
    ( v ) To drive around aimlessly. There was nothing to do last night, so we just went tooling around.
    1960s
  • tool
    ( v ) To use or take advantage of someone. Let's see if we can't tool Jenny into driving us out for some pizza.
    1970s
  • torch
    ( n ) An arsonist, someone who starts fires illegally for money. Burnham Goode was a torch for the mob until the police collared him on the job.
    1930s
  • torch
    ( v ) To commit arson, to burn down illegally. I hear Burnham Goode torched his own restaurant for the insurance money.
    1930s
  • torpedo
    ( n ) A hired killer. The torpedo she hired to off her husband turned out to be an undercover cop.
    1920s
  • toss your cookies
    ( vp ) To vomit. He ate so much that he tossed his cookies behind a potted palm.
    1980s
  • total
    ( v ) To completely destroy. He totaled his car last night.
    1950s
  • totally
    ( adv ) Very. That tank top she was wearing was totally gnarly.
    1980s
  • tough
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That's a real tough house; I'd like to live there.
    1980s
  • tough
    ( adj ) Too bad. You have a date tonight? That's tough; you have to baby-sit.
    1940s
  • town-gown
    ( adj ) Pertaining to relations between students and local residents in a college town. That guy over there isn't doing much for town-gown relations.
    1950s
  • townie
    ( n ) Permanent resident of a college town. Some townies threw eggs on the rods parked down town last night.
    1850s
  • trash
    ( v ) Totally destroy something. He trashed the car when it hit the wall.
    1980s
  • trashed
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. She went to a party last night and came home trashed.
    1960s
  • tribe
    ( n ) A clique, circle of friends. I'm meeting my tribe in the quad after class.
    1990s
  • trick that
    ( int ) I'm not doing it. Trick helping clean up, man, I'm leaving.
    1990s
  • tricked-out
    ( adj ) Exotic, elaborate, highly decorated. Did you see his new, tricked-out car?
    2000s
  • trip
    ( n ) Something out of the ordinary, special. The girl with the funny hairdo is a trip.
    1960s
  • trippy
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. She was totally trippy.
    1970s
  • troll
    ( v ) To cruise for girls. Let's go trolling for some chicks.
    1960s
  • troop
    ( n ) A long walk or trip. Taco Bell? That's a troop and a half.
    1980s
  • truck
    ( v ) Do business, carry on. Keep on trucking!
    1960s
  • truck
    ( v ) Move, go, come. We're trucking over to Joe's house to party.
    1960s
  • true
    ( adj ) Loyal; faithful. I trust him; that dude is true!
    1990s
  • tube
    ( n ) A place from which there is no return. All her efforts to get into a good college went down the tube(s).
    1960s
  • tube
    ( n ) Television, TV. I spent all day watching the tube yesterday.
    1950s
  • tube
    ( n ) The telephone. I'll give you a ring on the tube when I'm ready.
    1880s
  • tube steak
    ( np ) Hotdog, wiener. Why don't you stop by for a tube steak this weekend?
    1960s
  • tubular
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. His new board is tubular, dude.
    1980s
  • tunes
    ( n ) Music. Put on some tunes and let's dance.
    1970s
  • turf
    ( n ) Territory claimed by someone. You're on my turf now; you do as I say.
    1950s
  • turf
    ( v ) To force someone out of something. Stedman was turfed out of the club for wearing too much bling.
    1880s
  • turkey
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. That turkey hasn't sense enough to come in out of the rain.
    1950s
  • turn on
    ( v ) To intentionally allure men. She thinks her new perfume is going to turn all the guys on.
    1960s
  • turn on
    ( v ) To show off. Go out in the surf and turn on for everyone.
    1950s
  • turn-on
    ( n ) A girl who intentionally allures men. Don't get serious about her; she's just a little turn-on.
    1960s
  • tweak
    ( v ) To get high on drugs. Leave him! He's tweaked again.
    1990s
  • tweaker
    ( n ) Someone who gets high on drugs. That tweaker can't hold a job.
    1990s
  • twerp
    ( n ) Petty, immature brat. The little twerp told her mommie!
    1920s
  • twice pipes
    ( np ) Dual exhaust pipes. He has a cool ride with dual carbs and twice pipes.
    1950s
  • twisted
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. I've had too much to drink; I'm twisted.
    1960s
  • twisted
    ( adj ) Perverted. I wouldn't go out with him; everyone says he is twisted.
    1920s
  • twit
    ( n ) Petty, immature brat. The little twit barfed all over her date at the pizza parlor.
    1930s
  • twit
    ( n ) Superficial person. She is such a twit who spends most of her time shopping.
    1930s
  • twitching
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That new dress is twitching, girl.
    1990s
  • two bits
    ( n ) A 25-cent piece. I wouldn't give him two bits for that tin can he drives.
    1890s
  • two cents worth
    ( np ) Weak advice, opinion. Well, that's my two cents worth.
    1940s

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