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Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

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101 Results in W (You are getting Full results. Get Clean Results for "W")

  • wack
    ( adj ) Bad. He left the meeting early--a really wack move.
    1990s
  • wack
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. The guy is wack; you can't talk to him.
    1970s
  • wacko
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. Mona is totally wacko.
    1960s
  • wacky
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. I've never known a wackier person than Smoot.
    1940s
  • wad
    ( n ) Money. You don't want to carry a wad like that with you in the big city.
    1940s
  • wail
    ( v ) Go fast. You should see his rod wail, man; you couldn't keep up with him.
    1960s
  • walking-papers
    ( n ) Notice of being fired. I hear Sheila got her walking papers today.
    1950s
  • wang
    ( n ) A loser, a jerk. Anyone who skips class is a wang.
    1990s
  • wanger
    ( n ) A loser, a jerk. Their team is just a bunch of wangers.
    1990s
  • wank
    ( n ) A jerk who thinks he is great. He's such a wank; he thinks all the girls are in love with him.
    1980s
  • wannabe
    ( n ) Someone who wants to be something. He is a chef wannabe with no palate for fine cuisine.
    1980s
  • wannabe
    ( n ) Someone who aspires to be someone else. Wanda Sue is a TV weather host wannabe.
    1980s
  • wash out
    ( v ) To become jaded, no longer effective. I've worked on this job so long that I'm washed out.
    1950s
  • washed up
    ( adj ) Finished, done in. When the cops caught him, his criminal life was done in.
    1920s
  • waste
    ( v ) To kill. After you waste him, throw the body in the river.
    1960s
  • wasted
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He pounded beers all night and came home wasted.
    1970s
  • Way to go!
    ( int ) Good going, nice job. Nice 3-pointer, Bev. Way to go!
    1950s
  • wazoo
    ( n ) The buttocks. Martha kicked Ted right in the old wazoo!
    1970s
  • wear low
    ( vp ) To annoy, bother. Frank is wearing me low asking me for my phone number.
    1980s
  • wedgy
    ( n ) Pulling someone's pants up sharply to wedge them in the crack of the buttocks. Get Finley! He always loses his cool when we give him a wedgy.
    1950s
  • weed
    ( n ) A cigarette. Give me a weed, man. I'm having a nicotine fit.
    1970s
  • weed
    ( n ) Marijuana. I don't smoke weed, bro. It's just too dumb.
    1970s
  • weirdo
    ( n ) An eccentric. That new boy is a kind of weirdo.
    1960s
  • welch
    ( v ) To fail to meet an obligation. He welched on his promise to help paint my house.
    1930s
  • welcher
    ( n ) Someone who doesn't pay what is owed. You loaned him $10? The welcher will never pay you back.
    1910s
  • wet blanket
    ( np ) A squelcher. I hate to go to parties with Shamus Allgood. He's such a wet blanket.
    1850s
  • wet blanket
    ( np ) A squelcher. Ralph is such a wet blanket, I doubt you can get him to go a party.
    1920s
  • wet rag
    ( np ) A squelcher. Arnold is such a wet rag he won't even dance.
    1920s
  • whack
    ( v ) To kill. There was a contract out to whack Johnny for skimming the take at the casino.
    1980s
  • whacked
    ( adj ) Bad. It was a whacked scene when her boyfriend came in and caught them together.
    1980s
  • whacked
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. Man, I was whacked last night.
    1960s
  • whacked
    ( adj ) Tired, exhausted. I'm whacked; I can't go anywhere tonight.
    1910s
  • What the frick?
    ( int ) An interjection of disgust. What the frick! We're having a pop quiz?
    1980s
  • What the frig?
    ( int ) An interjection of disgust. What the frig! We're having a pop quiz?
    1950s
  • What's coming off?
    ( phr ) What is going on? So, man, what's coming off tonight.
    1960s
  • What's cooking?
    ( phr ) What is going on? Hey, buddy, what's cooking? Did somebody get hurt?
    1940s
  • What's cracking?
    ( phr ) What is going on? What's cracking, girl? You look like you lost your last friend.
    1980s
  • What's craculating?
    ( phr ) What is going on? What's craculating, dude?
    1990s
  • What's eating you?
    ( phr ) What is wrong with you? You don't want to see the Dodgers play? What's eating you?.
    1920s
  • What's going down?
    ( phr ) What is going on? What's going down, man? Why are all the cop cars here?
    1960s
  • What's popping?
    ( phr ) What is going on? What's popping, dude? Who drew all the squad cars outside?
    1980s
  • What's up?
    ( phr ) What is going on? What's up? Aren't we shooting hoops today?
    1940s
  • What's with you?
    ( phr ) What is wrong with you? Hey, what's with you, man. You're really bent.
    1930s
  • What's your damage?
    ( phr ) What is wrong with you? Why are you crying? What's your damage?
    1980s
  • what-say
    ( phr ) An expression of greeting. What-say, man? Long time, no see.
    1980s
  • whatever
    ( int ) An interjection of indifference. Wasn't our project due at noon? Whatever.
    1980s
  • wheel
    ( n ) An important person. Hardy Partier thinks he's a wheel because he's manager of the mailroom.
    1950s
  • wheel
    ( n ) A leg. Letticia was convinced that her wheels were as good as anybody's.
    1920s
  • wheel-horse
    ( n ) An important, visible, hard-working member of an organization. Correy Publican was a wheel-horse of the GOP before her arrest.
    1930s
  • wheeler-dealer
    ( n ) An important person. Hardy Partier thinks he's a wheel because he's manager of the mailroom.
    1950s
  • wheelie
    ( n ) Squealing tires. He can't pull away from the curve without making a wheelie.
    1950s
  • wheels
    ( n ) A car. I can't take my girlfriend out tonight because I don't have wheels.
    1950s
  • whip
    ( n ) A car. Lets hop in the whip and get up out of here.
    1990s
  • whipped
    ( adj ) Dominated by a woman or girl. Joe's so whipped he can't leave the house by himself.
    1990s
  • whistle Dixie
    ( vp ) To be mistaken. If you think you can make a good hotrod for $2000, you're whistling Dixie.
    1940s
  • whiz
    ( n ) A pee, urination. I need to take a whiz.
    1960s
  • whiz
    ( n ) Talented person. He is a whiz at the computer.
    1930s
  • whiz
    ( v ) To urinate. No need to stop for me; I whizzed before I left.
    1960s
  • Who's your daddy?
    ( phr ) Who is the most important person in your life? Did you like that shot? Who's your daddy?.
    1990s
  • whomp
    ( v ) Beat, whip. If you don't shut up, I'm going to whomp you.
    1950s
  • whoobang
    ( v ) To gossip. Quit your whoobanging and let's roll.
    1980s
  • Whoop-de-doo!
    ( int ) An Interjection of happy surprise. Our final has been cancelled? Whoopty-doo!
    1920s
  • whoopee
    ( n ) A good time. I've had a tough week. Let's go out and make some whoopee this weekend.
    1920s
  • whoopee
    ( n ) Hugging and kissing. They were in the living room making whoopee.
    1920s
  • Whoopee!
    ( int ) An interjection of enjoyment. Whoopee! I won the game!
    1860s
  • whoopie!
    ( int ) An Interjection of happy surprise. Whoopie! Mama hit the jackpot!
    1920s
  • wicked
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That flick was going-away wicked. I loved it.
    1980s
  • wicked
    ( adv ) Very. That flick was wicked bad.
    1980s
  • wig out
    ( v ) To lose control of yourself, go crazy. She wigged out when she saw me with my cousin.
    1980s
  • wigged
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. I can't talk to her any more; she's completely wigged.
    1980s
  • wiggity-wack
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. That Korean food was wiggity-wack.
    1980s
  • willies
    ( n ) Nervousness from fear, heebie-jeebies Just thinking of how close I came to hitting that other car gives me the willies.
    1890s
  • wimp
    ( n ) A weak, indecisive person. That wimp is afraid to ask May Belle for a date.
    1960s
  • wimpy
    ( adj ) Weak or weak-willed, inadequate. He tried to get the job but his attempt was a little wimpy.
    1960s
  • wind up
    ( v ) End up, go to finally. After making many wrong turns, he finally wound up right back where he started.
    1650s
  • wind up
    ( v ) Bring to an end. Let's wind up the party and go to bed.
    1820s
  • windbag
    ( n ) Someone who talks too much. That old windbag never stops talking about himself.
    1890s
  • wing
    ( v ) To wound superficially. The bank robber took a shot but only winged me.
    1800s
  • wino
    ( n ) A homeless alcoholic. He always gives change to the winos downtown.
    1910s
  • wipe out
    ( v ) To completely tire, fatigue. I've been shopping all day and right now I'm simply wiped out.
    1950s
  • wipe out
    ( v ) To crash on a wave, in a car or plane. He was a great pilot until he wiped out in Alaska.
    1960s
  • wired
    ( adj ) Tense, excited. I am really wired after drinking five cups of coffee.
    1960s
  • wiseacre
    ( n ) Someone who makes smart, saucy remarks. Don't be a wiseacre, Buzz, just get it done with no comment.
    1590s
  • wisenheimer
    ( n ) Someone who thinks he or she is smarter than others. Buzz is a wisenheimer who thinks he knows everything.
    1900s
  • with it
    ( pp ) Knowledgeable, aware of what really matters. That cat is one of us, man; he's with it!
    1960s
  • wolf
    ( n ) Aggressively forward male. Stay away from Lance Sterling; he is the biggest wolf in school.
    1940s
  • wonk
    ( n ) A studious, unsociable person. Well, the wonk got into Harvard but who would date him?
    1960s
  • woody
    ( n ) A wood sided station wagon. They stopped making woodies because the wood rotted.
    1960s
  • woody
    ( n ) An erection. Do you have a lot of money in your pocket or is that just a woody?
    1990s
  • woody
    ( n ) An erection. I get a woody just thinking about math.
    1980s
  • woof ticket
    ( v ) A lie. Girl, you're just selling woof tickets.
    1990s
  • word
    ( n ) News, latest gossip. So, what's the word, man?
    1900s
  • word from the bird
    ( np ) The truth. No school tomorrow and that's the word from the bird!
    1950s
  • Wow!
    ( int ) An interjection of surprise. Wow! You won the lottery?
    1940s
  • wrack your brain
    ( vp ) Think hard. I wracked my brain but couldn't come up with the answer.
    1940s
  • wrap up
    ( v ) To finalize, bring to an end. Merlyn wrapped up his presentation with a chorus of "Happy Days" played on the piano.
    1930s
  • wrap-up
    ( n ) A summary at the end of an event. Bert watched the late evening wrap-up of the news.
    1950s
  • wrecked
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. Felix came in about 2 AM totally wrecked.
    1960s
  • wrenched
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. She was so wrenched she couldn't even find the john.
    1990s
  • wuss
    ( n ) A sissy, a coward, a chicken. Morley is such a wuss he won't do anything without first asking his wife.
    1970s
  • wussy
    ( n ) A weak, indecisive person. Don't be such a wussy all the time. Say what you are thinking.
    1970s

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