Search found 18 matches

by tapoensgen
Mon Dec 11, 2017 12:43 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Ait
Replies: 2
Views: 159

Re: Ait

An ait on the River Thames is often also called an eyot. There are a few idyllic ones in the Thames near where I live, in the London Borough of Chiswick.
by tapoensgen
Wed Apr 02, 2014 5:35 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Asphalt
Replies: 3
Views: 1010

Re: Asphalt

It ought to be mentioned that in Britain and Ireland asphalt is typically called tarmac, relating back to that innovative scot MacAdam, who (re-)invented this form of road surfacing.
by tapoensgen
Tue Mar 25, 2014 5:55 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Grub
Replies: 6
Views: 2853

Re: Grub

Actually, grub is by no means Cowboy slang word only. It is commonly used in Britain to describe basic food, not necessarily bad. For example "pub grub" for the sort of basic fare you might be served in pubs (no longer so basic these days). One might also hear frequently people referring t...
by tapoensgen
Sun Feb 02, 2014 7:16 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Sack
Replies: 4
Views: 1429

Re: Sack

Oops! What happened to 'sack' as in 'loot and plunder a captured town'? :roll: That one seems to have a different root, as does the wine. Just a coincidence in spelling and pronunciation, I'm wondering what happened to the last 15 Super Bowls that we are playing one from 1999. At least one of the t...
by tapoensgen
Wed Jul 03, 2013 4:59 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Hamburger
Replies: 4
Views: 1505

Re: Hamburger

Today's word history appears to me very flimsy at best. The Tatars or Tartars where not a people at all. The term refers to an area within the Mongol Empire (so not Russia) inhabited by a number of peoples - Turkic, Mongol and Cossack. They, and indeed other horse people where known for softening me...
by tapoensgen
Sun Jun 23, 2013 6:39 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Badger
Replies: 5
Views: 1899

Re: Badger

Somewhat insular description of the animal as being "of North America". The vast majority of badger species (and numbers) have their habitats outside of the North America.
by tapoensgen
Tue Dec 18, 2012 7:41 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: punctuate / punctuation
Replies: 6
Views: 2571

punctuate / punctuation

This might be a wonderful and apt Good Word. It seems fairly obvious that it originates from the Latin punctum . However, a different theory suggests that its root lies with the Irish punc meaning dot . As we know (or should know), Irish monks were very early educators, missionaries and bible transl...
by tapoensgen
Thu Nov 01, 2012 7:19 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: KILTER
Replies: 3
Views: 1701

Re: KILTER

I could speculate on an origin, where Kilter (and Kelter) may be derived from the German "Keltern" (trampling grapes in the winemaking process), which stems from the Latin calcare - treading or trampling. As trampling of feet is a rhythmic process, being "out of kilter" would sug...
by tapoensgen
Sun Dec 18, 2011 7:13 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: copacetic
Replies: 3
Views: 1290

copacetic

Philip, I agree with you entirely. I speak fluent German and my Yiddish isn't bad either. Copacetic is an entirely ungermanic word in all its syllabic components and that would typically extend to Yiddish as well. Etymologically, it is also highly unlikely for such a word to find its way into the ja...
by tapoensgen
Sun Dec 18, 2011 4:59 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: copacetic
Replies: 3
Views: 1290

copacetic

I am fairly certain that the origin of copacetic is related to the extensive use of syncopation in jazz music. Since syncopation refers to something irregular in music - broadly speaking - copacetic is effectively an antonym, i.e. something smooth. I confirmed this theory of mine with an elderly for...
by tapoensgen
Sun Jul 24, 2011 5:46 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: NIGGARDLY
Replies: 6
Views: 2223

niggard

Addition to Word History:
Proto-Germanic *khnauwjaz developed into knausrig (miserly) and Knauser (a miserly person)
by tapoensgen
Tue May 24, 2011 3:41 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Brazen
Replies: 3
Views: 2068

@MTC - You are so right about the hussy, alas this (or rather she) has been dealt with by Dr. B. already.
by tapoensgen
Mon May 23, 2011 3:33 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Brazen
Replies: 3
Views: 2068

Brazen

Dear Dr. B - how about this very English word?
by tapoensgen
Wed May 04, 2011 4:21 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: TORNADO
Replies: 3
Views: 2213

tornado

I am not so sure that I can totally agree with some of the word history here. English thunder and German donner originate from the Nordic / Germanic god of thunder Thor / Donar. Of course we still honour this particular god every Thursday / Donnerstag / Donderdag. This origin clearly pre-dates the L...
by tapoensgen
Thu Mar 24, 2011 7:10 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Budget
Replies: 1
Views: 1850

Budget

As our Chancellor of the Exchequer (two more Good Words right there) opened the Budget (that's actually the correct term) yesterday, I thought it might be a good opportunity for Dr. Goodword to expand a little on this great and versatile word.

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