Search found 193 matches

by David Myer
Wed Mar 20, 2019 1:57 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: periodic/timely/regular
Replies: 3
Views: 1030

Re: periodic/timely/regular

Yes, people are very imprecise on their use of words in this area. Regular is as definite a time interval as periodic. It should not be used when 'at appropriate but as yet undetermined times' is the intention. 'Timely' is probably good enough although for some vague reason I am averse to its use. I...
by David Myer
Mon Mar 18, 2019 4:24 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Draw
Replies: 0
Views: 47

Draw

I reflected the other day on drawing the curtains. It seems to me that could equally mean to open them as to close them. So perhaps this is another contranym to add to sanction and cleave? Presumably this word is related to draught and drag and so there is no clue in its etymology. I wonder then why...
by David Myer
Tue Mar 12, 2019 6:08 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Shut
Replies: 0
Views: 316

Shut

I have long been amused by the apparent distinctions between Closed and Shut. Have you ever seen a shop that was shut for lunch? In America, I suppose that would be a store not a shop. I think in Australia and probably England they are always closed. But shut is so much nicer a word. I think that ma...
by David Myer
Fri Mar 01, 2019 7:01 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Loom
Replies: 3
Views: 330

Re: Loom

How nice to have one whose origins we really don't know. Here's a thought: Maybe the g of gloom has disappeared? Is there a history of the disappearing g? Gloaming/loaming? Glance/lance? Glove/love? Glass/lass... no, forget it...
by David Myer
Fri Mar 01, 2019 6:59 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Loom
Replies: 3
Views: 330

Deleted.
by David Myer
Sun Feb 24, 2019 6:44 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Scoundrel
Replies: 1
Views: 275

Re: Scoundrel

Splendid word, this one. But is it really so hard to trace its origins? I am not convinced by the ideas here. Surely drel is a standard suffix – spandrel, mandrel and perhaps others? Ahh! The internet finds also bedrel, a bedridden person; and a thongdrel, which is apparently some obscure Bhutanese ...
by David Myer
Wed Jan 23, 2019 6:07 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Patient
Replies: 1
Views: 1773

Patient

Everyone else has customers or, slightly pompously, even snobbishly, clients. But the medical professions have patients. When I visit my doctor, I go out of my way to refer to myself as a customer. Everyone winces a little, but I think it does no harm to remind them... There is a sort of suggestion ...
by David Myer
Tue Jan 22, 2019 5:57 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Fell
Replies: 4
Views: 731

Re: Fell

Thanks gwray for the Shakespeare quote. I went to see Twelfth night a couple of weeks ago at the main theatre in Melbourne, and that delightful piece escaped my attention. Well, I missed it. And yes, Pattie, I am sure my Australian dog would agree with the fowl swoop. Every day on his walk, he is at...
by David Myer
Tue Jan 15, 2019 9:29 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Dazzle
Replies: 1
Views: 356

Re: Dazzle

Interested in the suffix -le. Presumably related to the suffix -let as in hamlet, piglet, booklet...

And presumably also -lette that is manifestly a French equivalent to cover feminine words. Epaulette?

But what about 'Little' itself. Is that related too?

David
by David Myer
Thu Jan 10, 2019 9:07 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Buff
Replies: 0
Views: 181

Buff

I see that many years ago we explored 'buffalo' and that buff as a colour reflects the colour in a hide. But while today exploring the use of buff as an enthusiast, I see that this appears to stem from the buff coloured uniforms worn by volunteer firemen. And further, the expression 'in the buff' al...
by David Myer
Fri Dec 21, 2018 6:03 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Rantipole
Replies: 0
Views: 427

Rantipole

Apparently Pip, in Dickens' Great Expectations was called "young rantipole" by his older sister who thought him ill-behaved and disorderly. And in North America, Washington Irving wrote, rather picturesquely, in 'The Legend of Sleepy Hollow': “This rantipole hero had for some time singled ...
by David Myer
Fri Dec 07, 2018 7:09 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Patulous
Replies: 2
Views: 544

Re: Patulous

Not sure I like patulousness for the noun. Surely patulence is sweeter?
by David Myer
Mon Dec 03, 2018 5:51 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Homage
Replies: 5
Views: 906

Re: Homage

Thanks bnjtokyo. Of course. I hadn't thought it through properly. It's just that in my experience Hermitage wine is synonymous with Shiraz - which I think is the same thing as Syrah. It is easy to forget that it's really a place when it is used in that way. Just as we often forget that Sherry is a p...
by David Myer
Tue Nov 20, 2018 2:37 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Homage
Replies: 5
Views: 906

Re: Homage

Really! A silent h! Well maybe in America but in England and Australia, the h is always pronounced and the emphasis is on the first syllable. The French word has been fully absorbed and anglicised. Even when Orwell wrote his Homage to Catalonia in what, the 30s? The American pronunciation is heard o...
by David Myer
Tue Nov 20, 2018 2:27 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Colonel
Replies: 9
Views: 1252

Re: Colonel

Yes, perhaps lieutenant as a place-holder is a rank held in an 'acting' role while the serious officers are away. In the British army anyway, lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank so presumably a sergeant or similar was co-opted to the role after the captain had been shot?

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