Search found 699 matches

by Audiendus
Fri May 15, 2020 9:20 pm
Forum: Res Diversae
Topic: Palindromes
Replies: 1
Views: 1764

Palindromes

You are invited to make up palindromic sentences, or palindromic combinations of sentences. Here are some of mine:

Raw fog of war.
Mac's top nurses run pot scam.
No, Seville's mad damsel lives on.
No parts or clever Arsenal bar togs, eh? He's got Rab Lane's rare velcro strap on.
by Audiendus
Thu Apr 30, 2020 8:51 pm
Forum: Etymology
Topic: Solecism
Replies: 5
Views: 5199

Re: Solecism

Carolina doesn't qualify because it is not a commonzation, but a proper noun from a proper noun. Ditto for Dickensian . The meaning of the latter word hasn't changed, either. But Georgia , Georgian and Rabelaisian are included. (I was thinking of Dickensian in the sense of 'squalid, poverty-stricke...
by Audiendus
Tue Apr 28, 2020 9:22 pm
Forum: Etymology
Topic: Solecism
Replies: 5
Views: 5199

Re: Eponyms

Some other eponyms not in the list:

Carolina (from the Latin form of 'Charles', i.e. King Charles II)
cordwainer (from 'Cordoba')
Dickensian
landau (from the German city of that name)
by Audiendus
Tue Apr 07, 2020 8:43 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Sheepish
Replies: 0
Views: 2869

Sheepish

sheepish

Looking embarrassed or ashamed.

Probably from the sense of 'submissive', like a sheep.
by Audiendus
Mon Mar 16, 2020 10:34 pm
Forum: Grammar
Topic: Stand corrected
Replies: 3
Views: 15818

Re: Stand corrected

'Stand' in 'stand corrected' may be a copula, but I am quite sure that 'wage' in 'wage war' and 'throw' in 'throw a party' are ordinary transitive verbs, meaning 'conduct' and 'arrange' respectively. 'War' and 'party' are direct objects, not subject complements like 'fool' in 'I feel a fool' or 'nic...
by Audiendus
Fri Mar 13, 2020 10:44 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Cahoot
Replies: 3
Views: 5131

Re: cohort/exhort

It seems that cohort and exhort are etymologically unrelated to each other. But I wonder if one influenced the other at any point.
by Audiendus
Fri Mar 13, 2020 1:12 am
Forum: Grammar
Topic: Stand corrected
Replies: 3
Views: 15818

Stand corrected

What is the correct grammatical analysis of "I stand corrected"? Is 'stand' here an intransitive verb with independent meaning, as in "I stand firm" or "I stood transfixed with fear"? Or is it merely a linking verb (copula), equivalent to "I am in a corrected state"? The latter explanation would mak...
by Audiendus
Thu Jan 30, 2020 11:08 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Fun
Replies: 0
Views: 6060

Fun

fun (noun)

Originally a verb meaning 'to cheat' or 'to trick', then a noun meaning 'trick', 'deception', and acquiring its current sense in the 18th century.

The attributive adjectival use (e.g. 'a fun game') is recent.
by Audiendus
Tue Jan 07, 2020 12:53 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Burke
Replies: 8
Views: 2287

burke/berk

I don't understand how burke and berk can be regarded as versions of the same word. Burke is derived from William Burke and means 'cover up' or 'suffocate'; berk comes from 'Berkshire (or Berkeley?) Hunt' and means 'fool'. Different origin, different meaning.
by Audiendus
Wed Nov 27, 2019 12:10 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Standard
Replies: 0
Views: 2816

Standard

standard (noun or adjective) Here is a word with many meanings. The military sense, of a raised banner carried in battle, seems to be the original one. How it acquired its other meanings is not clear. A standard may be a measure of excellence, or on the other hand it may refer to something that is ...
by Audiendus
Tue Nov 19, 2019 1:50 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Iron
Replies: 1
Views: 3926

Iron

iron

This word has an interesting etymology, as described here. Note the anomalous pronunciation, and the various different meanings.

It is unrelated to irony (with pronounced 'r') and ironic.
by Audiendus
Sat Nov 02, 2019 2:03 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Cappuccino
Replies: 0
Views: 2108

Cappuccino

cappuccino Originally from Italian cappuccino meaning 'Capuchin monk'. The monks (who wore light brown robes, similar to the light brown of the drink) were named after the Italian word cappuccio , meaning 'hood'. According to Wiktionary, the Italian word for the monk was borrowed by Viennese German...
by Audiendus
Fri Nov 01, 2019 11:00 pm
Forum: Etymology
Topic: Imbue/imbrue
Replies: 1
Views: 35072

Imbue/imbrue

imbue, imbrue How closely are these two words (with similar meanings) etymologically related? They are apparently both connected to the Latin verb bibere (to drink), but do they have any closer connection than that? I was unfamiliar with "imbrue" until I found it on the list of Good Words just now ...
by Audiendus
Thu Oct 17, 2019 11:49 pm
Forum: Grammar
Topic: English plurals: a poem
Replies: 6
Views: 62802

Re: English plurals: a poem

An additional couplet could be included somewhere in my poem:

Sometimes, to confuse the reader,
German forms are used, like Lieder.
by Audiendus
Mon Oct 14, 2019 11:12 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Random
Replies: 0
Views: 948

Random

random

Originally part of the phrase "at random", literally "at high speed", from the earlier word randon, 'speed', 'impetuosity'. The idea is that of rushing about aimlessly.

It is related to the word 'run'.

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