Search found 663 matches

by Audiendus
Wed Oct 10, 2018 9:08 pm
Forum: Grammar
Topic: Dismissed the service
Replies: 1
Views: 1155

Dismissed the service

"He was dismissed the service." The above sentence, often used in a military context, is grammatically rather odd. What grammatical role does "the service" play here? Is there a particular name for this construction? Are there any other examples of it? One can, of course, altern...
by Audiendus
Wed Oct 03, 2018 9:23 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Catachresis
Replies: 0
Views: 229

Catachresis

Catachresis An unconventional use of a word, either through error (e.g. mitigate instead of militate ), or deliberately for effect (e.g. the weeping of the clouds), or in order to create a new expression (e.g. soap opera , disc jockey ). Malapropisms (e.g. 'philanthropy' for 'philately') and single...
by Audiendus
Tue Aug 21, 2018 8:51 pm
Forum: Pronunciation
Topic: 'Zh' sound in English
Replies: 4
Views: 14161

Re: 'Zh' sound in English

Thank you. That is very detailed and informative.
by Audiendus
Mon Aug 20, 2018 9:11 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Sweat
Replies: 3
Views: 567

Re: Sweat

I can't think of another word in English ending in -eat that is pronounced -et. There is "threat". Incidentally, if the re- in repeat means again, surely peat is a word? Not as in peat bogs; that's different of course. But peat as in do or say something. Is there a history here? "Rep...
by Audiendus
Thu Aug 16, 2018 9:03 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Rococo
Replies: 0
Views: 657

Rococo

rococo (noun or adjective)

A highly ornamental style of furniture and architecture, found in continental Europe in the late Baroque period (18th century).
by Audiendus
Thu Jul 12, 2018 9:37 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Noisome
Replies: 1
Views: 328

Re: Noisome

Noisome, noise, nuisance, noxious, nausea. All these words denote something unpleasant - but most of them are unrelated etymologically, it seems.
by Audiendus
Sat Jul 07, 2018 9:23 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Bon mot
Replies: 14
Views: 1499

Re: Bon mot

Notes: The plural of today's word is bon mots Most English dictionaries give only the French spelling for the (English) plural, i.e. bons mots . Those that give both spellings put bons mots first. That is the spelling I would use. The same applies to bons vivants (not bon(s) viveurs , which is pseu...
by Audiendus
Wed Jun 20, 2018 9:09 pm
Forum: Pronunciation
Topic: 'Zh' sound in English
Replies: 4
Views: 14161

Re: 'Zh' sound in English

Slava wrote:What sound does barge end in? Is it not a zh preceded by a d?

I mean the pure 'zh' sound (not a component of the 'j' sound), as found in borrowings from French such as massage, mirage, cortege and beige.
by Audiendus
Wed Jun 20, 2018 10:47 am
Forum: Pronunciation
Topic: 'Zh' sound in English
Replies: 4
Views: 14161

'Zh' sound in English

The 'zh' sound (voiced 'sh') occurs relatively rarely in native English words, and only in the middle of them. For example: vision and its compounds, leisure, pleasure, measure, seizure, treasure, exposure, closure, lesion, plosion and its compounds, occasion, casual . It is not a difficult sound fo...
by Audiendus
Sun May 06, 2018 8:22 am
Forum: Grammar
Topic: 'As': pronoun or conjunction?
Replies: 3
Views: 1062

Re: 'As': pronoun or conjunction?

Thanks a lot. I have a few further comments/questions: In my opinion, in 1), "as" is a relative pronoun meaning "which." The antecedent is "argument" I would prefer to say that the antecedent is the whole of the clause "There was a heated argument". So we can ...
by Audiendus
Fri May 04, 2018 8:43 am
Forum: Grammar
Topic: 'As': pronoun or conjunction?
Replies: 3
Views: 1062

'As': pronoun or conjunction?

Consider the following sentences: There was a heated argument, as often happens . We disagreed, as is often the case . The answer is as follows . Think what will happen if we fail, as seems possible . As was customary , they sat on the floor. Is 'as': (a) a pronoun acting as the subject of the depen...
by Audiendus
Wed Apr 11, 2018 10:03 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Congeries
Replies: 5
Views: 728

Re: premises

premises (meaning a specific area of real estate, as in "the premises is the headquarters of a tech company") I would use a plural verb here. "The premises are the headquarters..." "These [not 'this'] premises are the headquarters..." However, both "this headquart...
by Audiendus
Tue Apr 10, 2018 9:36 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Congeries
Replies: 5
Views: 728

Re: Congeries

So, a 'curve' word is one that isn't what it seems to be. Contumely "arrogant rudeness" is one of my favorites, a noun that seems to be an adverb. Congeries seems to be a plural noun but it isn't; it is singular though it may be used unchanged in the plural. 'Congeries' is similar in form...
by Audiendus
Tue Feb 20, 2018 12:06 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Lachrymatory
Replies: 2
Views: 518

Re: Lachrymatory

Word History: Lachrymatory comes to us from Middle French or Medieval Latin lacrymal from Medieval Latin lacrimalis, the adjective from Latin lacrima "tear". Etymonline refers to "the Medieval Latin practice of writing -ch- for -c- before Latin r- ", and states that "the -y...
by Audiendus
Mon Feb 19, 2018 9:00 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Street
Replies: 0
Views: 1060

Street

street https://www.etymonline.com/word/Street A rare example of a word derived from Latin through Old English. From Latin (via) strata , "paved road". Ultimately from PIE root stere- , "to spread", from which many English words are derived. Street is related to stretch and, more...

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