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by Audiendus
Tue Oct 13, 2020 8:43 am
Forum: Site News
Topic: Traffic drop
Replies: 9
Views: 340

Re: Traffic drop

Everything on the site is working OK for me. No problems. With regard to David Myer's posts above, another regular member we lost some years ago was Saparris, with whom I used to write 'Group Poems' (see Res Diversae). I don't know about Daniel Obertance – he is not in the List of Members, and there...
by Audiendus
Fri Oct 02, 2020 8:13 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Luthier
Replies: 8
Views: 463

Re: Luthier

Most Americans say "th" when speaking of the German airline "Lufthansa" and I am OK with that. I suppose the "proper" pronunciation of "Neanderthal" also requires a "t" not a "th," but I don't feel like a caveman because I pronounce all the letters in the word. In the UK we pronounce "Lufthansa" wi...
by Audiendus
Fri Sep 25, 2020 8:58 pm
Forum: Idioms
Topic: Back in the day
Replies: 2
Views: 393

Re: Back in the day

Thanks a lot for the information. I suspected that this idiom is of recent origin. It seems to have caught on quickly.
by Audiendus
Thu Sep 24, 2020 1:21 am
Forum: Idioms
Topic: Back in the day
Replies: 2
Views: 393

Back in the day

Back in the day (A long while ago, especially at a time of which one has happy memories) This, as a complete expression (rather than "Back in the day when...") seems to be a fairly new idiom. I would be interested in any views about its use, and date and place of origin. Is it a specifically Britis...
by Audiendus
Mon Sep 14, 2020 10:01 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Avenue
Replies: 2
Views: 232

Re: Avenue

'Avenue Road' (something of a tautology) and 'The Avenue' are very common street names. Don't you hate those ridiculous computer programs that ask for the street name and want the word 'street' or whatever in the next field and they offer all the alternatives the silly programmer could think of? Usu...
by Audiendus
Mon Sep 14, 2020 1:26 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Avenue
Replies: 2
Views: 232

Avenue

avenue From Latin via French. Originally 'approach' or 'way of approach', then 'approach road to a country house', then 'wide road lined with trees', then any wide street, then used randomly for the names of residential streets. Still used to mean 'approach' in a non-physical sense, e.g. 'avenue of...
by Audiendus
Mon Jul 20, 2020 11:47 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Cockeyed
Replies: 0
Views: 842

Cockeyed

cockeyed

Crooked, absurd, drunk, or having a squint.
by Audiendus
Thu Jun 04, 2020 11:10 pm
Forum: Res Diversae
Topic: Palindromes
Replies: 3
Views: 9375

Re: Palindromes

It is, of course, more difficult to make the spaces as well as the letters symmetrical. The best I can do at present is the following:

No pay? God, pets! I spot Bateman. No tub, but on nametab tops I step. Dog, yap on!
by Audiendus
Fri May 15, 2020 9:20 pm
Forum: Res Diversae
Topic: Palindromes
Replies: 3
Views: 9375

Palindromes

You are invited to make up palindromic sentences, or palindromic combinations of sentences. Here are some of mine:

Raw fog of war.
Mac's top nurses run pot scam.
No, Seville's mad damsel lives on.
No parts or clever Arsenal bar togs, eh? He's got Rab Lane's rare velcro strap on.
by Audiendus
Thu Apr 30, 2020 8:51 pm
Forum: Etymology
Topic: Solecism
Replies: 5
Views: 6463

Re: Solecism

Carolina doesn't qualify because it is not a commonzation, but a proper noun from a proper noun. Ditto for Dickensian . The meaning of the latter word hasn't changed, either. But Georgia , Georgian and Rabelaisian are included. (I was thinking of Dickensian in the sense of 'squalid, poverty-stricke...
by Audiendus
Tue Apr 28, 2020 9:22 pm
Forum: Etymology
Topic: Solecism
Replies: 5
Views: 6463

Re: Eponyms

Some other eponyms not in the list:

Carolina (from the Latin form of 'Charles', i.e. King Charles II)
cordwainer (from 'Cordoba')
Dickensian
landau (from the German city of that name)
by Audiendus
Tue Apr 07, 2020 8:43 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Sheepish
Replies: 0
Views: 3210

Sheepish

sheepish

Looking embarrassed or ashamed.

Probably from the sense of 'submissive', like a sheep.
by Audiendus
Mon Mar 16, 2020 10:34 pm
Forum: Grammar
Topic: Stand corrected
Replies: 3
Views: 25687

Re: Stand corrected

'Stand' in 'stand corrected' may be a copula, but I am quite sure that 'wage' in 'wage war' and 'throw' in 'throw a party' are ordinary transitive verbs, meaning 'conduct' and 'arrange' respectively. 'War' and 'party' are direct objects, not subject complements like 'fool' in 'I feel a fool' or 'nic...
by Audiendus
Fri Mar 13, 2020 10:44 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Cahoot
Replies: 3
Views: 5651

Re: cohort/exhort

It seems that cohort and exhort are etymologically unrelated to each other. But I wonder if one influenced the other at any point.
by Audiendus
Fri Mar 13, 2020 1:12 am
Forum: Grammar
Topic: Stand corrected
Replies: 3
Views: 25687

Stand corrected

What is the correct grammatical analysis of "I stand corrected"? Is 'stand' here an intransitive verb with independent meaning, as in "I stand firm" or "I stood transfixed with fear"? Or is it merely a linking verb (copula), equivalent to "I am in a corrected state"? The latter explanation would mak...

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