Search found 658 matches

by Audiendus
Thu Jul 12, 2018 9:37 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Noisome
Replies: 1
Views: 208

Re: Noisome

Noisome, noise, nuisance, noxious, nausea. All these words denote something unpleasant - but most of them are unrelated etymologically, it seems.
by Audiendus
Sat Jul 07, 2018 9:23 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Bon mot
Replies: 8
Views: 701

Re: Bon mot

Notes: The plural of today's word is bon mots Most English dictionaries give only the French spelling for the (English) plural, i.e. bons mots . Those that give both spellings put bons mots first. That is the spelling I would use. The same applies to bons vivants (not bon(s) viveurs , which is pseu...
by Audiendus
Wed Jun 20, 2018 9:09 pm
Forum: Pronunciation
Topic: 'Zh' sound in English
Replies: 2
Views: 3478

Re: 'Zh' sound in English

Slava wrote:What sound does barge end in? Is it not a zh preceded by a d?

I mean the pure 'zh' sound (not a component of the 'j' sound), as found in borrowings from French such as massage, mirage, cortege and beige.
by Audiendus
Wed Jun 20, 2018 10:47 am
Forum: Pronunciation
Topic: 'Zh' sound in English
Replies: 2
Views: 3478

'Zh' sound in English

The 'zh' sound (voiced 'sh') occurs relatively rarely in native English words, and only in the middle of them. For example: vision and its compounds, leisure, pleasure, measure, seizure, treasure, exposure, closure, lesion, plosion and its compounds, occasion, casual . It is not a difficult sound fo...
by Audiendus
Sun May 06, 2018 8:22 am
Forum: Grammar
Topic: 'As': pronoun or conjunction?
Replies: 3
Views: 938

Re: 'As': pronoun or conjunction?

Thanks a lot. I have a few further comments/questions: In my opinion, in 1), "as" is a relative pronoun meaning "which." The antecedent is "argument" I would prefer to say that the antecedent is the whole of the clause "There was a heated argument". So we can ...
by Audiendus
Fri May 04, 2018 8:43 am
Forum: Grammar
Topic: 'As': pronoun or conjunction?
Replies: 3
Views: 938

'As': pronoun or conjunction?

Consider the following sentences: There was a heated argument, as often happens . We disagreed, as is often the case . The answer is as follows . Think what will happen if we fail, as seems possible . As was customary , they sat on the floor. Is 'as': (a) a pronoun acting as the subject of the depen...
by Audiendus
Wed Apr 11, 2018 10:03 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Congeries
Replies: 5
Views: 606

Re: premises

premises (meaning a specific area of real estate, as in "the premises is the headquarters of a tech company") I would use a plural verb here. "The premises are the headquarters..." "These [not 'this'] premises are the headquarters..." However, both "this headquart...
by Audiendus
Tue Apr 10, 2018 9:36 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Congeries
Replies: 5
Views: 606

Re: Congeries

So, a 'curve' word is one that isn't what it seems to be. Contumely "arrogant rudeness" is one of my favorites, a noun that seems to be an adverb. Congeries seems to be a plural noun but it isn't; it is singular though it may be used unchanged in the plural. 'Congeries' is similar in form...
by Audiendus
Tue Feb 20, 2018 12:06 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Lachrymatory
Replies: 2
Views: 438

Re: Lachrymatory

Word History: Lachrymatory comes to us from Middle French or Medieval Latin lacrymal from Medieval Latin lacrimalis, the adjective from Latin lacrima "tear". Etymonline refers to "the Medieval Latin practice of writing -ch- for -c- before Latin r- ", and states that "the -y...
by Audiendus
Mon Feb 19, 2018 9:00 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Street
Replies: 0
Views: 993

Street

street https://www.etymonline.com/word/Street A rare example of a word derived from Latin through Old English. From Latin (via) strata , "paved road". Ultimately from PIE root stere- , "to spread", from which many English words are derived. Street is related to stretch and, more...
by Audiendus
Sat Dec 16, 2017 12:27 am
Forum: Idioms
Topic: The man on the Clapham omnibus
Replies: 4
Views: 23095

Re: The man on the Clapham omnibus

Slava wrote:Does "see how it flies in Peoria" work?

Yes, that seems to be a similar idea.

A rather different kind of character is Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells.
by Audiendus
Fri Dec 15, 2017 11:39 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Besmirch
Replies: 2
Views: 341

Re: Behead

Etymonline states that the earliest use of "head" as a verb meant "behead". So it seems that the "be-" prefix does not change the meaning; the privative sense belongs to "head" itself.
by Audiendus
Wed Sep 06, 2017 11:06 am
Forum: Idioms
Topic: The man on the Clapham omnibus
Replies: 4
Views: 23095

The man on the Clapham omnibus

A recent visit to the London suburb of Clapham reminded me of this quaint British phrase. Originally a legal expression originating in the 19th century, it means 'an ordinary, reasonable person'. It is now mostly used humorously as a mock archaism. It is probably the only context in which 'omnibus' ...
by Audiendus
Sat Sep 02, 2017 9:13 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Plyometric
Replies: 2
Views: 633

Re: Plyometric

It apparently comes from the Greek plio- meaning 'more' or 'greater'. (Compare 'Pliocene' in geology.)

http://dictionary.com/browse/plyometrics

http://dictionary.com/browse/plio-
by Audiendus
Tue Aug 01, 2017 10:30 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Halo
Replies: 0
Views: 510

Halo

Halo From Greek/Latin halos , signifying roundness: originally "threshing floor with a circular path", then "disk of the sun or moon", then "ring of light around the sun or moon", and finally (in English) "ring of light around the head". There does not seem t...

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