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by Audiendus
Sat Dec 16, 2017 12:27 am
Forum: Idioms
Topic: The man on the Clapham omnibus
Replies: 2
Views: 6811

Re: The man on the Clapham omnibus

Slava wrote:Does "see how it flies in Peoria" work?

Yes, that seems to be a similar idea.

A rather different kind of character is Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells.
by Audiendus
Fri Dec 15, 2017 11:39 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Besmirch
Replies: 2
Views: 187

Re: Behead

Etymonline states that the earliest use of "head" as a verb meant "behead". So it seems that the "be-" prefix does not change the meaning; the privative sense belongs to "head" itself.
by Audiendus
Wed Sep 06, 2017 11:06 am
Forum: Idioms
Topic: The man on the Clapham omnibus
Replies: 2
Views: 6811

The man on the Clapham omnibus

A recent visit to the London suburb of Clapham reminded me of this quaint British phrase. Originally a legal expression originating in the 19th century, it means 'an ordinary, reasonable person'. It is now mostly used humorously as a mock archaism. It is probably the only context in which 'omnibus' ...
by Audiendus
Sat Sep 02, 2017 9:13 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Plyometric
Replies: 2
Views: 466

Re: Plyometric

It apparently comes from the Greek plio- meaning 'more' or 'greater'. (Compare 'Pliocene' in geology.)

http://dictionary.com/browse/plyometrics

http://dictionary.com/browse/plio-
by Audiendus
Tue Aug 01, 2017 10:30 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Halo
Replies: 0
Views: 441

Halo

Halo From Greek/Latin halos , signifying roundness: originally "threshing floor with a circular path", then "disk of the sun or moon", then "ring of light around the sun or moon", and finally (in English) "ring of light around the head". There does not seem t...
by Audiendus
Wed Jul 26, 2017 7:31 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Quincunx
Replies: 4
Views: 525

Re: Quincunx

Quincunx is also used in astrology to mean an aspect of 150 degrees (five-twelfths of a circle) between two planets.
by Audiendus
Fri Jul 21, 2017 12:15 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Frolic
Replies: 6
Views: 591

Re: Frolic

LukeJavan8 wrote:I enjoy how we add that 'k' to a number of these words.

Yes - magic/magicking, mimic/mimicking, panic/panicking, bivouac/bivouacking etc. But usually arc/arcing (arcking is a less common alternative).
by Audiendus
Wed Jul 06, 2016 9:07 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Cognate
Replies: 2
Views: 1242

Re: Cognate

Here are some examples of false cognates in English (words that have some degree of similarity in both form and meaning, but are etymologically unrelated):

isle/island
prodigal/prodigious
Passover/Paschal (discussed here).

Can anyone think of other examples?
by Audiendus
Fri May 20, 2016 8:50 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Oust
Replies: 2
Views: 1049

Re: Pakistan

The etymology of the name 'Pakistan' is explained here.

It literally means 'Land of the Pure' in Urdu and Persian, but it can also be thought of as an acronym of the constituent regions.
by Audiendus
Wed May 04, 2016 11:27 am
Forum: Idioms
Topic: just like that . . .
Replies: 2
Views: 14981

Re: all of a sudden

The origin of the phrase 'all of a sudden' is mentioned here . It dates back to Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew . 'Sudden' could formerly be used as a noun, hence the archaic alternative on a sudden . 'Of' in 'all of a sudden' seems similar to the temporal 'of' seen in the phrases of late and ...
by Audiendus
Mon Apr 11, 2016 11:08 pm
Forum: Idioms
Topic: common or garden
Replies: 1
Views: 980

common or garden

'Common or garden' is a mainly British idiom meaning 'ordinary'. It need not have anything to do with gardens (e.g. "a common or garden computer"). It is always used before a noun, and may be hyphenated (common-or-garden). Its general use dates back to the 1880s. I am interested to know ho...
by Audiendus
Sat Apr 09, 2016 10:03 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Umpteen
Replies: 6
Views: 3892

Re: Umpteen

As this has not yet been featured as a Good Word, I would like to renew this suggestion (see the discussion above).
by Audiendus
Mon Mar 28, 2016 8:49 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: leitmotif
Replies: 2
Views: 704

Re: leitmotif

It is an anglicized form of the German word Leitmotiv.

A recurrent musical theme is also sometimes called a motto theme, or (especially in Berlioz's music) an idée fixe.
by Audiendus
Fri Mar 25, 2016 10:46 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Cayuse
Replies: 16
Views: 2409

Re: Cayuse

Perry Lassiter wrote:WASH-i-taw, short i as in pit. The Ouachita was the tribal name, also in AR, where you can find Ouachita Baptist College.

The 'ou' spelling for the 'w' sound suggests French influence. As in Ouagadougou (pronounced 'Wagadugu'), the capital of Burkina Faso, Africa.
by Audiendus
Sat Mar 19, 2016 10:57 pm
Forum: Pronunciation
Topic: Long 'i' in -ind
Replies: 4
Views: 31001

Re: Long 'i' in -ind

Well, the 'short i' seems to be generally pronounced with more of a drawl in the US than in Britain (particularly in Southern US accents), but I would not have thought this applies only to the -ing suffix. There are personal idiosyncrasies, however. I remember a British television announcer of the f...

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