Search found 728 matches

by Audiendus
Thu Jul 08, 2021 8:36 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Palaver
Replies: 3
Views: 1989

Re: Palaver

In British English, palaver usually means a long, tedious, unnecessarily complex procedure, a rigmarole.
by Audiendus
Thu Jun 24, 2021 9:46 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Abject
Replies: 5
Views: 443

Re: Abject

"Abject shamelessness" comes up 356 times on a Google search. Apparently, it sounds OK to a few others.
Sounds like an oxymoron to me. 'Abject shame' would be OK.
by Audiendus
Thu Jun 24, 2021 1:49 am
Forum: Pronunciation
Topic: Long 'i' in -ind
Replies: 8
Views: 46953

Re: Long 'i'

Can anyone explain why the 'i' in 'Christ' is long?
The Online Etymology Dictionary has the answer:
Pronunciation with long -i- is result of Irish missionary work in England, 7c.-8c.
by Audiendus
Mon Jun 21, 2021 11:12 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Trap
Replies: 5
Views: 446

Re: Trap

The connection seems to be "something on/into which one steps":

http://etymonline.com/word/trap
by Audiendus
Mon Jun 21, 2021 11:03 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Earmark
Replies: 7
Views: 546

Re: Earmark

But in relation to meaning 3. I say emphatically "Surely not!" At least if it is in use, it is surely only in error.
It's in the dictionaries:

http://thefreedictionary.com/earmark
by Audiendus
Mon Jun 07, 2021 12:57 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Earnest
Replies: 3
Views: 420

Re: Earnest

It is also used idiomatically as a noun in the phrase 'in earnest'. This phrase is an idiom because it can't be tampered with. If you tamper with it you have to use the active noun, 'in all earnestness'.
We can say 'in deadly earnest', as an alternative idiom.
by Audiendus
Sat Jun 05, 2021 9:28 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: placate
Replies: 3
Views: 2159

Re: placate

I pronounce the first 'a' in both placate and placatory as a schwa. As in abate and narrate.
by Audiendus
Thu May 13, 2021 10:36 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Like
Replies: 2
Views: 492

Re: Like

Time flies like a banana.
I think that should be:

Fruit flies like a banana.
by Audiendus
Thu May 13, 2021 10:22 pm
Forum: Res Diversae
Topic: But Isn’t Any More?
Replies: 4
Views: 691

Re: But Isn’t Any More?

He/she may be dead.

"President Eisenhower was a former military commander."
by Audiendus
Sun Apr 04, 2021 11:35 pm
Forum: Pronunciation
Topic: Long 'i' in -ind
Replies: 8
Views: 46953

Re: Long 'i'

Can anyone explain why the 'i' in 'Christ' is long?
by Audiendus
Tue Mar 16, 2021 10:43 pm
Forum: Grammar
Topic: Math v Language
Replies: 2
Views: 677

Re: Math v Language

The relevant sentence of the study (in the section headed "Life Cycle Analysis") states: "This resulted in an overall carbon footprint for Fast Track VFA-SAF of -55 g CO 2 eq/MJ, which is 165% lower than fossil jet fuel (85 g CO 2 eq/MJ)." Note that the reduction is from plus 85 g to minus 55 g. So ...
by Audiendus
Wed Mar 10, 2021 12:43 am
Forum: Grammar
Topic: If not/Unless
Replies: 5
Views: 1392

Re: If not/Unless

#4 is definitely off, but can we establish exactly why? What do you think about #5/6? (4) I would go out now unless it were cold. (5) I would help you now if you did not object. (6) I would help you now unless you objected. What if we omit the 'now'? I wonder if this is a semantic rather than a gram...
by Audiendus
Wed Mar 03, 2021 12:00 pm
Forum: Grammar
Topic: If not/Unless
Replies: 5
Views: 1392

If not/Unless

Consider the following sentences: (1) I will go out tomorrow if it is not cold. (2) I will go out tomorrow unless it is cold. (3) I would go out now if it were not cold. (4) I would go out now unless it were cold. We can replace (1) with (2) without changing the meaning, but we cannot replace (3) wi...
by Audiendus
Thu Feb 18, 2021 10:12 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Client
Replies: 1
Views: 597

Client

client

This word has an interesting etymology. It is derived from the idea of "relying ('leaning') on someone".

https://etymonline.com/word/client
by Audiendus
Mon Jan 25, 2021 9:57 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Hew
Replies: 6
Views: 1873

Re: Hew

Etymonline has this to say on the question: "Seemingly contradictory sense of "hold fast, stick to" (in phrase hew to), 1891, developed from earlier figurative phrase hew to the line "stick to a course," literally "cut evenly with an axe or saw."" Thanks. So it seems that the similar double meaning...

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