Search found 36 matches

by badandy
Thu Dec 15, 2005 3:58 am
Forum: Etymology
Topic: Zeroing in On the Issue
Replies: 11
Views: 14131

And....

Monolingualism (especially in a country as big as the US) is far greater an asset than a detriment.
by badandy
Thu Dec 15, 2005 3:57 am
Forum: Etymology
Topic: Zeroing in On the Issue
Replies: 11
Views: 14131

a majority of the people of the world - with the exception of those residing on large portions of the North American continent - are, in fact, multi-lingual. Thus multi-lingualism is the norm, not, as some suppose, the exception.... so are speakers of both Norwegian and Swedish multilingual? How ab...
by badandy
Mon Dec 05, 2005 7:17 pm
Forum: Etymology
Topic: tasty
Replies: 19
Views: 24399

i'm pretty sure it's bad andy, but who can be sure! Actually I was christened badandy after the Domino's Pizza mascot, and I needed an on-air disc jockey name. I'm not really that bad (except at Portuguese), but the name stuck.
by badandy
Mon Dec 05, 2005 7:03 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Misplaced relative
Replies: 16
Views: 17547

of course! I understand that its a joke, but what you said made me think. One of my professors said once that Linguistic change and continuity theory owes a lot to biology. Apparently language changes and develops much the same way genetics does. Its a natural smooth evolution that really cant be ch...
by badandy
Mon Dec 05, 2005 6:49 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: How does your brain learn languages?
Replies: 56
Views: 50091

Slavic-sounding! Ha! I always thought it was like a drunk Frenchman trying to speak Spanish. To me, some languages sound prettier than others, and I'd have to say Brazilian Portuguese is one of my favorites. Eu gosto Os Mutantes e todos dos Tropicalistas. Hopefully I didnt butcher it too much. The p...
by badandy
Mon Dec 05, 2005 6:34 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Misplaced relative
Replies: 16
Views: 17547

It is probably a poor translation that will eventually work is way into the very heart of Brazilian Portuguese from English until a Portuguese sentense won't seem right unless it ends in a preposition! Apo Again, I don't think borrowing works like that, especially not syntactical stuff like preposi...
by badandy
Mon Dec 05, 2005 5:24 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: How does your brain learn languages?
Replies: 56
Views: 50091

i think another important point is the difference between comprehension and production. i can understand little bits of lots of languages, like greetings, etc. and I could tell you the basic structures, phonological characteristics, etc. but when it comes to having a conversation or writing novel se...
by badandy
Mon Dec 05, 2005 4:59 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Misplaced relative
Replies: 16
Views: 17547

using that preposition sem at the end of the sentence in Portuguese is totally against the rules and idiom. so this construction is not prevalent in spoken Portuguese? Did it make sense when you read it? It seems unlikely that it has anything to do with English 'invading' anything, other than the t...
by badandy
Mon Dec 05, 2005 4:42 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Does learning another language help you with English?
Replies: 11
Views: 12548

I agree with the other posters- and I think a very important point to be made is about phonology. As a native English speaker, I never thought about my own language, but as you learn about others, a more sharp focus is put on your own native tongue. i.e.- /th/ in 'this' and 'thin' are different soun...
by badandy
Mon Dec 05, 2005 4:01 pm
Forum: Etymology
Topic: Some thing WICKED this way comes!
Replies: 38
Views: 56823

Re: Some thing WICKED this way comes!

eberntson wrote:And in California, it can be "wicked awesome", but in the valley "wicked" has a few other meanings.
What Valley are you speaking of?
by badandy
Mon Dec 05, 2005 3:57 pm
Forum: Etymology
Topic: Zeroing in On the Issue
Replies: 11
Views: 14131

there seems to be convenient answers for just about everything if one searches, but in reality, especially in language things are never very clean or easy. Some of my favorite language myths: everyone in Spain has a lisp because some king did. Any language is more complicated than another Speaking m...
by badandy
Mon Dec 05, 2005 3:41 pm
Forum: Etymology
Topic: tasty
Replies: 19
Views: 24399

Re: tasty

M. Henri Day wrote: the word «*nostos» doesn't remind me of very much at all. Where did you happen upon it ?...
this word is the term for the archetypal hero's 'return quest' as seen in the Odyssey. I had originally wondered about its relation to 'nostalgia' it seems to have spark a 'tasty' discussion
by badandy
Mon Dec 05, 2005 3:25 pm
Forum: Etymology
Topic: Names of Dacian Kings
Replies: 19
Views: 31730

theres nothing boring about Latin names! Its funny that to the English speaking world (of which Im part), Latin and Greek seem lofty and scientific, almost mathematical and free from human contamination, when they are just languages, spoken by scholars and children (in the past) similar to say, Taga...
by badandy
Fri Oct 28, 2005 2:54 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Greek v. Latin - compound words
Replies: 1
Views: 4242

Greek v. Latin - compound words

I was thinking about the compounding of words to create new words and the similarities of Greek and Germanic languages. These are examples of Greek and Latin stratarche:s - general, military leader (e: is eta - long e) strategos - general stratopedon - army camp, tent stratia - army stratiote:s - so...
by badandy
Fri Oct 28, 2005 1:45 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: From the Language of Advertising and Public Relations . . .
Replies: 38
Views: 38183

Good job, Washington. Way to get everyone sumpnspicious of their neighbors and fear and alienate anyone who looks or acts differently and report them to the police. Then they get harrassed just for being the way they are. I think the terrorists are winning. by the way, how do you pronounce this? I s...

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