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by William Hupy
Mon Feb 18, 2019 11:09 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Par
Replies: 0
Views: 63

Par

This simple word might come in handy when you are desperate enough to resort to three letter words in Scrabble. It comes from Latin, meaning equal.
by William Hupy
Fri Feb 08, 2019 11:13 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Mull
Replies: 0
Views: 796

Mull

As a verb it means to pulverize and to ponder. There are two separate senses of the noun. Three if you count the island off the coast of Scotland. A fine soil or a fine cloth.
by William Hupy
Wed Jan 23, 2019 4:28 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Ultimatum
Replies: 0
Views: 76

Ultimatum

I only went back as far as Medieval Latin, but I think this has PIE roots. Latin: ultimus, meaning final. A threat usually Issued by a stronger to a weaker adversary.
by William Hupy
Mon Dec 31, 2018 11:32 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Metastasize
Replies: 0
Views: 785

Metastasize

For 19 years I have held a cheesecake contest on the last day of the year. Inevitably, bits of cake fall to the floor and with the crowd of people sampling the cakes, the sticky, gooey contents spread across the floor unless I deligently clean up. Is it wrong for me to borrow this word from the medi...
by William Hupy
Fri Nov 23, 2018 10:45 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Omertà
Replies: 0
Views: 808

Omertà

This word is from Sicily, meaning code of silence. The Oxford English Dictionary traces the word to the Spanish word hombredad, meaning manliness, modified after the Sicilian word omu for man. According to a different theory, the word comes from Latin humilitas (humility), which became umirtà and th...
by William Hupy
Tue Nov 13, 2018 9:03 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Battle
Replies: 0
Views: 506

Battle

I recently noticed that the Italian word for battle is Battaglia, and naturally figured a Latin parent, which is battuere, meaning to beat. From there to old French, where we grabbed it. What is unusual about this word is that the ancient Latin speakers may have borrowed this from Gaulic and not a d...
by William Hupy
Tue Nov 06, 2018 10:04 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Scant
Replies: 0
Views: 558

Scant

From Middle English scant, from Old Norse skamt, neuter of skammr (“short”), from Proto-Germanic *skammaz (“short”), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ḱem- (“mutilated, hornless”).
by William Hupy
Mon Oct 22, 2018 10:11 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Coitus
Replies: 1
Views: 499

Coitus

This originally meant come together, until it took on the predominately sexual sense. But it’s PIE and Latin roots were simply “come with”. Co + ire.
by William Hupy
Sun Sep 30, 2018 1:27 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Applique
Replies: 0
Views: 789

Applique

From French, from Latin. A material applied over another.
by William Hupy
Thu Sep 27, 2018 1:19 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Jostle
Replies: 0
Views: 683

Jostle

Originally justle. To knock against as in joust. This originally meant “to have sex”. As I recall jazz originally meant the same. There is no end to verbs for that activity.
by William Hupy
Mon Sep 24, 2018 4:26 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Hindrance
Replies: 0
Views: 524

Hindrance

It appears this is strictly of Germanic origin. To repress.
by William Hupy
Mon Sep 24, 2018 10:05 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Grotto
Replies: 0
Views: 405

Grotto

From Greek to Latin to Italian. Then to us. It can reference either a natural or artificial cave.
by William Hupy
Mon Sep 10, 2018 10:18 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Idea
Replies: 0
Views: 740

Idea

The idea occurred to me when studying Italian, idea. The word for idea in german is similar: idee. I reckoned that since both the Germanic and Romance languages have variations of this same theme, there must be a PIE origin. Sure enough. *wid-es-ya-, suffixed form of root *weid- "to see."
by William Hupy
Fri Aug 24, 2018 10:44 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: lapsarian
Replies: 0
Views: 918

lapsarian

I saw this word in an article in Atlantic, but used in a non biblical sense, which made sense...the belief in the fall of man from innocence.
by William Hupy
Thu May 24, 2018 10:16 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Stint
Replies: 0
Views: 610

Stint

I was surprised that the Germanic origin of this has a PIE heritage.

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