Search found 52 matches

by William A Hupy
Sat Jun 05, 2021 10:57 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Didicoy
Replies: 2
Views: 314

Re: Didicoy

I heard it on an episode of Midsommer Murders.
by William A Hupy
Sat Jun 05, 2021 7:21 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Didicoy
Replies: 2
Views: 314

Didicoy

Is this word from merry old England considered derogatory?
by William A Hupy
Tue May 18, 2021 9:17 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Marriage
Replies: 1
Views: 313

Marriage

I’m studying French. I note that the word for the town hall is “la maire”. A town hall is a place where a couple would go to get married at a wedding. The French word for wedding is “mariage”. The French word for husband? Mari. All from Latin, as, it appears, are to be found in the romance languages.
by William A Hupy
Tue Apr 27, 2021 7:40 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Tsundoku
Replies: 1
Views: 678

Tsundoku

This combines two words in Japanese, for piling up and reading. It means acquiring reading materials but letting them pile up in one's home without reading them. It is also used to refer to books ready for reading later when they are on a bookshelf.
by William A Hupy
Mon Apr 05, 2021 8:23 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: entrepreneur
Replies: 1
Views: 521

entrepreneur

This comes to us, relatively recently from French, as one who undertakes. However, the root, prendre, goes way, way back to PIE, Ghent, to grasp, seize. From that root also we received prehensile.
by William A Hupy
Tue Mar 30, 2021 9:23 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: semantic
Replies: 1
Views: 553

semantic

The Good Word doctor used this word today and it occurred to me that I may not have understood the context. The etymology has a distinguished Greek and French history. I looked for the PIE root, which means....to look, see. This word in English means, relating to meaning in language or logic. I susp...
by William A Hupy
Thu Mar 25, 2021 4:20 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Precinct
Replies: 0
Views: 590

Precinct

A district defined for purposes of government and representation. This comes from Latin, meaning to gird about, to surround. Prae, cingere. before cinch.
by William A Hupy
Mon Mar 22, 2021 10:18 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Gamine
Replies: 0
Views: 642

Gamine

From French for street urchin. Now a slim, pert young girl.
by William A Hupy
Thu Mar 18, 2021 11:47 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Geriatric
Replies: 1
Views: 565

Geriatric

Both roots are Greek. They combine the Greek for growing old with treatment.
by William A Hupy
Sat Mar 06, 2021 8:13 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Canker
Replies: 1
Views: 521

Canker

Cancer, crab and canker. All related. Who’d have thunked?
by William A Hupy
Thu Feb 25, 2021 6:27 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Turgid
Replies: 1
Views: 500

Turgid

Bombastic. I see this comes from Latin, turgidus , meaning swollen, inflated, distended, but is it related to turbulent?
by William A Hupy
Thu Feb 18, 2021 11:08 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: epistemic
Replies: 0
Views: 923

epistemic

Pertaining to knowledge. From the Greek, over, stand..which I don’t under or over stand at all.
by William A Hupy
Tue Feb 16, 2021 9:22 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Endemic
Replies: 1
Views: 572

Re: Endemic

I suggested this good word on February 12 and it appeared as the word on February 16, without crediting me. No hard feelings, as I enjoy this site regardless, or as we say in the UP, irregardless.
by William A Hupy
Fri Feb 12, 2021 12:40 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Endemic
Replies: 1
Views: 572

Endemic

A: belonging or native to a particular people or country B: characteristic of or prevalent in a particular field, area, or environment. I don’t quite understand how the current pandemic is now being characterized as having the potential to become endemic, meaning it will be with us...oh, I think I s...
by William A Hupy
Wed Jan 20, 2021 10:13 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Subjunctive
Replies: 1
Views: 682

Subjunctive

I’m currently studying French. I hit the subjunctive. What is it? Mood employed to denote an action or state? Huh? Anyone out there with a basic understanding of grammar? Does English employ this? And how?

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