Search found 182 matches

by David Myer
Fri Oct 12, 2012 12:01 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: MNEMONIC
Replies: 18
Views: 5961

Re: MNEMONIC

Most commonly and nearly exclusively, where I come from (UK and Australia), the word is generally used for the specific memory device - enabling you to remember say, the sequence of the colours in a rainbow by turning the initial letters into a word - ROYGBIV. A sort of acronym but with a different ...
by David Myer
Sat Sep 08, 2012 6:03 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Dandruff
Replies: 12
Views: 7369

Re: Dandruff

Mutually beneficial, perhaps? Not one word though and there probably is one.
by David Myer
Sun Sep 02, 2012 9:51 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Dandruff
Replies: 12
Views: 7369

Re: Dandruff

Well, nice try! Another possibility is dend- as prefix meaning trees. But that perhaps is even more far-fetched. I wonder when it was first used?
by David Myer
Sun Sep 02, 2012 9:02 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Dandruff
Replies: 12
Views: 7369

Dandruff

I can't find a plausible etymology for this one and it's such a lovely word. Can anyone throw any light on it?

david
by David Myer
Tue Aug 21, 2012 7:06 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Metathesis
Replies: 7
Views: 2524

Re: METATHESIS

I get it! If the ears were pealed, perhaps the ringing has stopped and we can hear clearly once more? Anyway after all this information I have decided to stop apologising for my typos - from now on they are metatheses.
by David Myer
Tue Aug 21, 2012 6:44 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Metathesis
Replies: 7
Views: 2524

Re: METATHESIS

I liked this one. Very interesting. But astonished to see 'ears pealed'. Surely 'peeled'? Eyes peeled so there is no skin on them so they can see clearly? And ears (a little less sweetly) so they can hear properly. 'But pealed'? - or have I misunderstood something?
by David Myer
Tue Aug 21, 2012 6:42 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Metathesis
Replies: 7
Views: 2524

Re: METATHESIS

I
by David Myer
Thu Nov 10, 2011 6:20 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: DISGRUNTLE
Replies: 6
Views: 1871

I must say I also am disconcerted by the growth of underwhelm. Quite nice in a light-hearted piece of original writing, but as a new word, I'm not so sure. I suppose it has a real meaning that everyone understands and it's probably better than unimpressed or unexcited. Is there a positive word thoug...
by David Myer
Thu Nov 10, 2011 7:07 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: DISGRUNTLE
Replies: 6
Views: 1871

The interesting thing here, is that the word has the same meaning whether it is disgruntle or gruntle. And since gruntle is much nicer word, my family and I have taken to using it in preference. Similarly overwhelm and whelm which as far as I can make out have the same meaning. Perhaps 'whelm' would...
by David Myer
Wed Oct 26, 2011 5:32 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: EGAD
Replies: 4
Views: 1352

Or the one I was brought up with 'Gadzooks!' God's ooks? What's an ook?

With my British heritage, I have to say I have never seen or heard Egad as a plural.
by David Myer
Wed Sep 14, 2011 10:51 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: BILLET-DOUX
Replies: 4
Views: 1866

Well, well, well. So confident was I that I didn't check it before I spoke. And now I see even my Macquarie Australian Dictionary agrees with you. I am sorry for questioning it. But I will certainly talk to French speakers and see how they would pronounce it. Well I have learned something and that's...
by David Myer
Wed Sep 14, 2011 2:40 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: BILLET-DOUX
Replies: 4
Views: 1866

Surely not pronounced 'dooze'! The French I'm sure pronounce it as we would say 'do', don't they? And I have never heard anyone say 'dooze'. Perhaps this is another American development. I could sort of understand it if you said billet as in fish fillet - then the thing has indeed become anglicised,...
by David Myer
Sat Sep 10, 2011 3:14 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: MOOT
Replies: 5
Views: 2248

This is a very interesting example for the discussion on yesterday's word. Moot clearly means 'debatable' insofar as that is it's original meaning. That it has been misconstrued over a long period (in North America) and taken to mean 'not worthy of debate' does not legitimise the error. I know langu...
by David Myer
Sat Sep 10, 2011 2:49 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: METTLESOME
Replies: 13
Views: 3786

What about the confusion between 'hanged' and 'hung'? Grrr!
by David Myer
Fri Sep 09, 2011 7:18 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: METTLESOME
Replies: 13
Views: 3786

Woe!

Tis as I feared then. We have effectively lost the battle. Alternate and alternative are now interchangeable in the e
'either or' sense. So sad when they actually have such clearly defined meanings. And there are many situations where it matters. Forgive me if I continue to use them distinctly.

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