Search found 160 matches

by David Myer
Tue May 03, 2016 12:16 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Aitch
Replies: 28
Views: 6096

Re: Aitch

Very interesting. So how do you pronounce 'H'? If some dictionaries spell it with an h at the start, and if accented syllables that start with an h should always have it pronounced, what does that mean for we mortals? Taking your instruction literally, I suppose if we choose to spell it with an h at...
by David Myer
Thu Mar 03, 2016 11:21 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Stifle
Replies: 2
Views: 766

Re: Stifle

Not sure about the gerund, but this Word History makes it look as though the lovely word 'stuff' is related. Particularly the reference to flax and caulking. But my dictionary suggests that stuff comes from the French estoffer, to furnish or equip. And of course estoffer is different from estouffer....
by David Myer
Tue Feb 09, 2016 6:21 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Divulge
Replies: 2
Views: 909

Re: Divulge

So if the 'vulge' part is from vulgare, to make public, why do we bother with the 'di' part? Shouldn't the word be simply 'vulge'?

A bit like the difference between whelm and overwhelm, where as far as I can see, the overwhelm is almost a tautology (if you can have one of those in a single word).
by David Myer
Wed Jan 27, 2016 1:52 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Stuff
Replies: 5
Views: 1780

Re: Stuff

Absolutely Margaret. Far more fun than the longer Latin words.
by David Myer
Tue Jan 26, 2016 5:40 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Stuff
Replies: 5
Views: 1780

Re: Stuff

Splendid! Thanks for all that. These older words are interesting because they show how meanings evolve. Little nuances and inflections become whole new meanings.

This is surely a suitable candidate for Word of the Day?
by David Myer
Wed Oct 07, 2015 2:11 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Yclept
Replies: 6
Views: 1546

Re: yclept

Bravo, Perry, and I shall use it too. It certainly deserves use because as far as I can make out, there are no other words in English that start with a y and are followed by a consonant. Suffixes (yl, yne) abbreviations, proper nouns (Yvonne, Ypres, Yquem) and foreign words (yggdrasil) excluded.
by David Myer
Tue Oct 06, 2015 2:08 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Yclept
Replies: 6
Views: 1546

Re: yclept

When do you use it, Perry? Give us a sample sentence...
by David Myer
Mon Oct 05, 2015 2:11 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Yclept
Replies: 6
Views: 1546

Yclept

Came across this in an obscure H.G.Wells book. Had to look it up of course and found that it simply means 'named'. So I am one of many men yclept David. I think that is a fair use. But HGWells wrote of Mr Pope as saying: "What will you drink, Mr Wintersloan?" he said. "Wine of the cou...
by David Myer
Wed Sep 16, 2015 9:21 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Salubrious
Replies: 7
Views: 1919

Re: Salubrious

Perhaps the world's English dictionaries need an update?
by David Myer
Wed Sep 16, 2015 2:34 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Salubrious
Replies: 7
Views: 1919

Re: Salubrious

Well, well, well. This one was a real surprise. Healthy or wholesome - even in Australia and the Macquarie Dictionary here confirms that. But I have a lifetime using it occasionally, and always to mean sort of half way between comfortable and luxurious - salubrious accommodation, salubrious suburb. ...
by David Myer
Sun Aug 30, 2015 7:24 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Aitch
Replies: 28
Views: 6096

Re: aitch

Perhaps that's because they don't say it right! Howdy is not very Australian. "G'day, mate", perhaps.
by David Myer
Sat Aug 29, 2015 9:09 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Aitch
Replies: 28
Views: 6096

Re: aitch

Love your cousin's vernacular, Philip! Yes, my experience of 'et' is limited - both in UK and Australia. But it is neither specifically a down-market nor an up-market affectation. I do think the pronunciation tends to "we et prawns for lunch today". This is quite widespread here in Austral...
by David Myer
Fri Aug 28, 2015 8:07 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Aitch
Replies: 28
Views: 6096

Re: aitch

Thanks Gkovac. Your dictionary says pronunciation is eych with no 'T'. More interestingly for me, with no initial 'H'. I have now come across this article from the BBC in 2010: "British English dictionaries give aytch as the standard pronunciation for the letter H. However, the pronunciation ha...
by David Myer
Thu Aug 27, 2015 6:51 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Aitch
Replies: 28
Views: 6096

Re: aitch

I suppose really it's an argument not about spelling (it is very rarely used) but about pronunciation. Should it be pronounced haitch by English speaking people? The French can do as they please and not be bound by pedantic semantics.
by David Myer
Thu Aug 27, 2015 5:04 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Good Words Five Days a Week
Replies: 22
Views: 16353

Re: Good Words Five Days a Week

I think I did the poll but failed to recognise the motivation for the question - I have only just now stumbled upon this discussion. So whatever I said in the poll needs to be ignored. The first and most important thing is for the Good Doctor to continue enjoying what he does. As soon as it becomes ...

Go to advanced search