Search found 156 matches

by David Myer
Tue Jan 26, 2016 5:40 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Stuff
Replies: 5
Views: 1650

Re: Stuff

Splendid! Thanks for all that. These older words are interesting because they show how meanings evolve. Little nuances and inflections become whole new meanings.

This is surely a suitable candidate for Word of the Day?
by David Myer
Wed Oct 07, 2015 2:11 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Yclept
Replies: 6
Views: 1435

Re: yclept

Bravo, Perry, and I shall use it too. It certainly deserves use because as far as I can make out, there are no other words in English that start with a y and are followed by a consonant. Suffixes (yl, yne) abbreviations, proper nouns (Yvonne, Ypres, Yquem) and foreign words (yggdrasil) excluded.
by David Myer
Tue Oct 06, 2015 2:08 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Yclept
Replies: 6
Views: 1435

Re: yclept

When do you use it, Perry? Give us a sample sentence...
by David Myer
Mon Oct 05, 2015 2:11 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Yclept
Replies: 6
Views: 1435

Yclept

Came across this in an obscure H.G.Wells book. Had to look it up of course and found that it simply means 'named'. So I am one of many men yclept David. I think that is a fair use. But HGWells wrote of Mr Pope as saying: "What will you drink, Mr Wintersloan?" he said. "Wine of the cou...
by David Myer
Wed Sep 16, 2015 9:21 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Salubrious
Replies: 7
Views: 1770

Re: Salubrious

Perhaps the world's English dictionaries need an update?
by David Myer
Wed Sep 16, 2015 2:34 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Salubrious
Replies: 7
Views: 1770

Re: Salubrious

Well, well, well. This one was a real surprise. Healthy or wholesome - even in Australia and the Macquarie Dictionary here confirms that. But I have a lifetime using it occasionally, and always to mean sort of half way between comfortable and luxurious - salubrious accommodation, salubrious suburb. ...
by David Myer
Sun Aug 30, 2015 7:24 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Aitch
Replies: 28
Views: 5483

Re: aitch

Perhaps that's because they don't say it right! Howdy is not very Australian. "G'day, mate", perhaps.
by David Myer
Sat Aug 29, 2015 9:09 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Aitch
Replies: 28
Views: 5483

Re: aitch

Love your cousin's vernacular, Philip! Yes, my experience of 'et' is limited - both in UK and Australia. But it is neither specifically a down-market nor an up-market affectation. I do think the pronunciation tends to "we et prawns for lunch today". This is quite widespread here in Austral...
by David Myer
Fri Aug 28, 2015 8:07 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Aitch
Replies: 28
Views: 5483

Re: aitch

Thanks Gkovac. Your dictionary says pronunciation is eych with no 'T'. More interestingly for me, with no initial 'H'. I have now come across this article from the BBC in 2010: "British English dictionaries give aytch as the standard pronunciation for the letter H. However, the pronunciation ha...
by David Myer
Thu Aug 27, 2015 6:51 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Aitch
Replies: 28
Views: 5483

Re: aitch

I suppose really it's an argument not about spelling (it is very rarely used) but about pronunciation. Should it be pronounced haitch by English speaking people? The French can do as they please and not be bound by pedantic semantics.
by David Myer
Thu Aug 27, 2015 5:04 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Good Words Five Days a Week
Replies: 22
Views: 15921

Re: Good Words Five Days a Week

I think I did the poll but failed to recognise the motivation for the question - I have only just now stumbled upon this discussion. So whatever I said in the poll needs to be ignored. The first and most important thing is for the Good Doctor to continue enjoying what he does. As soon as it becomes ...
by David Myer
Thu Aug 27, 2015 4:49 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Aitch
Replies: 28
Views: 5483

Aitch

aitch Debate rages in Australia on whether the correct name of the letter 'H' is aitch or haitch. I thought it was clear cut and that people who said haitch had been poorly educated. My observation (purely anecdotal) is that in Australia, it is people who have had a catholic education that use the ...
by David Myer
Thu Aug 20, 2015 6:35 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Dross
Replies: 0
Views: 769

Dross

I love the sense of disdain (or superiority) that attaches to this word.

But the origin is slightly unsatisfactory. Is it the dregs (on the bottom) or the scum (on the top)? Can it really be either?
by David Myer
Mon Aug 03, 2015 7:18 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Stuff
Replies: 5
Views: 1650

Stuff

This rather charming correspondence between me in Australia and a tour company in Cambodia got me thinking about stuff. I wrote: We recently undertook a trip from Siem Reap to HCM on the Jahan. Our guides suggested that it would be nice to have pencils, crayons, books etc for the school we visited w...
by David Myer
Wed Jul 29, 2015 6:18 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: Dudgeon
Replies: 1
Views: 688

Dudgeon

Lovely word. We all know about high dudgeon, but what about a dudgeon dagger. My guess is that Goodword members will be thrilled to hear that it is also known as a bollocks dagger, for, as it turns out, obvious reasons. I have what can only be described as a 'bollocks steel' for sharpening knives. L...

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