Search found 405 matches

by anders
Sat May 13, 2006 9:42 am
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Do they speak "epañol" in Chili?
Replies: 17
Views: 31676

A few months ago, I had a coffee together with my Vietnamese/Chinese fellow student and two of her female friends. I was perfectly sure that they spoke some Slavic language, but I couldn't identify any words (I've had some very elementary courses in Russian and Bulgarian). They said it was Albanian!
by anders
Fri May 12, 2006 12:02 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Russian etymology question
Replies: 11
Views: 17672

Why? Wasn't it supposed to come out this way?
Brazilian dude
Yes, but as you must have noticed by now, on preview, all interesting characters/letters turn up as &blabla codes.
by anders
Wed May 10, 2006 4:25 am
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Russian etymology question
Replies: 11
Views: 17672

My Russian doesn’t even qualify for taking 1st uni semester Russian, but the way I understand it is that сорок is derived from, or can at least can be compared to, Greek σαράκοντα < Old Greek τεσσαράкоντα. So, no magic.
by anders
Fri May 05, 2006 5:35 pm
Forum: Etymology
Topic: Proper adjectives
Replies: 23
Views: 46587

Perry, I do appreciate finding you here. In Swedish, we make a difference between "israeliter" and "israeler", the former being those Arabs who left nomadism and established themselves as sedentary agriculturalists in Palestine, and the latter, being the present-day inhabitants of Palestine who are ...
by anders
Fri May 05, 2006 5:52 am
Forum: Etymology
Topic: Proper adjectives
Replies: 23
Views: 46587

I'm not very interested in many parts of Africa, but for Kashmir

Kash•mir•i
...
—n.
1. a native or inhabitant of Kashmir.
...
and

Kash•mir•i•an
...
—n.
a Kashmiri.

(Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Copyright © 1997, by Random House, Inc., on Infoplease.)
by anders
Thu Apr 27, 2006 12:17 pm
Forum: Res Diversae
Topic: English has hit the Billion mark
Replies: 28
Views: 29280

From http://www.languagelog.com/ Numerous journalists have already swallowed the absurdly specious claim that the English language is going to add its millionth word some time later this year. But doesn't "one million" sound a little paltry? Well, never fear. Today the Associated Press trumpets even...
by anders
Sat Apr 22, 2006 4:11 am
Forum: Spelling
Topic: What is it with PH & F?
Replies: 34
Views: 87253

"Unaspirated after s" is not just Conventional Wisdom (TM) as taught in every textbook of phonetics for Germanic languages, but from the practical side, knowing this was a great help in mastering (to at least an acceptable degree) the difference between the aspirated and unaspirated stops in Hindi.
by anders
Fri Apr 14, 2006 10:38 am
Forum: Res Diversae
Topic: here's one I can do finally! I got 17
Replies: 15
Views: 25907

Yet another entertaining resurrection of a thread!
I think this test pretty much only works on those who grew up in the US as 'baby boomers'.
Thanks.
by anders
Fri Apr 14, 2006 10:35 am
Forum: Grammar
Topic: "Question Tags" they are important, aren't they?
Replies: 28
Views: 55160

English tags feel very strange to me. The positive aspect is that I'm pretty sensitive to and pick up (dis)similar things in other languages. I have already mentioned two Arabic ways. Then there's the subtleties of Chinese questions ending in the particle ma , more often than not translated as "?". ...
by anders
Tue Apr 11, 2006 7:48 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: How many languages do you know?
Replies: 4
Views: 8930

If you don't know where you are going, take any road. If you're interested in language universals (if there are such things), pick as diverse languages as possible. You've got Indo-European and one Semitic, so for this case, I'd suggest Chinese. If you're sufficiently young to have a chance to appro...
by anders
Fri Apr 07, 2006 12:00 pm
Forum: Etymology
Topic: Test Your Knowledge
Replies: 14
Views: 20939

Re: Test Your Knowledge

Which Foreign Language Is Closer To English? a. French b. German c. Spanish d. Gaelic e. Italian Correct answer and historical references will posted within 7 days. Geographically, I'd say d. For syntax, b. For vocabulary, a or b. But generally, I agree with those saying that Frisian is even closer...
by anders
Tue Apr 04, 2006 4:13 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Chinese "rap"
Replies: 28
Views: 39571

No to mention that I distinctly remember having seen in an article on machine translation and/or computational linguistics that the liquor/meat example is just an urban legend.

Anyone who has tried the stuff will realize that machinery never will be able to match us professional translators.
by anders
Thu Mar 30, 2006 6:46 pm
Forum: Idioms
Topic: Frogs & Hailstones?
Replies: 27
Views: 58067

I still regret that I five years ago didn't buy the cook book (in (almost) Swedish) that I saw in a Greek shop. Just like the restaurant case, it prescribed something like "Take your liver, clean it and cut it in small pieces".
by anders
Mon Mar 27, 2006 10:28 am
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Vena azygos
Replies: 4
Views: 9620

I know no Greek at all, so I can't even judge if it's helpful that it isn't inflected in its arch, arcus venae azygos.
by anders
Sun Mar 19, 2006 3:05 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: How little is too little?
Replies: 2
Views: 6027

University departments of linguistics teaching for example language universals would love it, because there is no chance that the students will find material to plagiarize on the Internet. And there's also at least one language nut who would say, I just need it, because it fills a void in my library...

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