Search found 137 matches

by Garzo
Fri Sep 23, 2005 9:56 am
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Lexical Gaps
Replies: 42
Views: 52386

Perhaps it's because Anglo-Saxon food isn't meant to be enjoyed! Such lexical gaps are really quite subjective. As languages deal with the stuff of human experience, it is always possible to translate well-formed language. However, a certain language may have a particularly succinct or beautiful way...
by Garzo
Wed Sep 21, 2005 6:25 pm
Forum: Grammar
Topic: sped vs. speeded
Replies: 10
Views: 21087

Well, guys, technically, only light, wake, weave, cleave (cling) and plead count as being of the same class as speed, but thanks for finding them for me.

-- Garzo.
by Garzo
Tue Sep 20, 2005 9:19 am
Forum: Grammar
Topic: tense
Replies: 14
Views: 18811

Re: tense

Hi all, This is my first time to post. I am a Japanese student learning Enghlish. :D Here's my question. Are the following sentences both correct? If so, what is the difference between them? (1) I decided to wait at the station until my wife came . (2) I decided to wait at the station until my wife...
by Garzo
Mon Sep 19, 2005 6:57 am
Forum: Grammar
Topic: sped vs. speeded
Replies: 10
Views: 21087

For the phrase to speed up , speeded up is the most usual past form. I have heard sped up in speech, but it looks awkward written. I know of no other verbs that form alternative pasts by either regular -ed or vowel gradation. There are a handful that form alternative pasts with either -ed or -t , ho...
by Garzo
Tue Sep 13, 2005 7:35 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Strict Swedes and forceful Finns
Replies: 1
Views: 4073

Strict Swedes and forceful Finns

My attention was drawn to a packet of cigarettes from Finland. Being bilingual, the law requires the EU health warning to be in Swedish as well as Finnish. The packet read: Älä pakota lapsia hengittämään savua. Låt inte barn andas rök. This, I gather, translates as Don't force children to inhale smo...
by Garzo
Mon Sep 05, 2005 6:59 am
Forum: Res Diversae
Topic: Holiday?
Replies: 13
Views: 14181

Ah, now I am enlightened. It's quite a nice thing to have a psychological turning points in the calendar. We have the last Monday in August off -- a kind of last chance get away weekend. I think it's officially called something rather mundane like Late Summer Bank Holiday. As for Labo(u)r Day, we te...
by Garzo
Sun Sep 04, 2005 8:16 pm
Forum: Res Diversae
Topic: Holiday?
Replies: 13
Views: 14181

Holiday?

I think it must be a US thing. A friend from the States mentioned that this is a holiday weekend. Could anyone enlighten me what he's celebrating?

-- Garzo.
by Garzo
Sun Sep 04, 2005 8:30 am
Forum: Etymology
Topic: Rootin' Tootin'
Replies: 2
Views: 11040

Rootin' Tootin'

Well, there have a number of thunderstorms recently, and I haven't been allowed to play outside, so I've had to sit in watching cowboy films. I wonder if all you lovely people could embroider me a comprehensive history of the phrase rootin' tootin' . Please feel free to add any other cowboy slang yo...
by Garzo
Wed Aug 31, 2005 10:15 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: EDUCATION
Replies: 2
Views: 3263

Yup, e-duc-ere means 'to draw out'. A duke (dux) was originally a battlefield leader: he led the troops out. So, thank you, Katie, for making me think of all those dukes of education preparing to take the strain: heave-ho!

-- Garzo.
by Garzo
Sun Jul 31, 2005 9:27 am
Forum: Grammar
Topic: like to do different from like doing?
Replies: 15
Views: 20389

I think the differentiation between because and so is a bit of a red herring. The first factor here is the nuanced use of like . It most usually means a considered enjoyment of something. However, it can be used to say 'this is how it is': "I would like to talk to you in my office now!" The employer...
by Garzo
Sat Jul 30, 2005 7:54 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: litotes
Replies: 10
Views: 7907

I once taught Spanish students English. Teaching litotes was one of the hardest jobs (beside bowels!). I remember paedagogically castigating a student with "We do not say 'What a beautiful day' in English: we say 'What a nice day'"!

How do you like them light oats?

-- Garzo.
by Garzo
Sat Jul 30, 2005 7:50 pm
Forum: Grammar
Topic: subjectless clauses
Replies: 10
Views: 18211

Called implied subject. Is used all the time. Use it all the time. Quite handy really. Most often seen on postcards: "Wish you were here". Wouldn't worry about it. S'long's context giving necessary.

--?
by Garzo
Sat Jul 30, 2005 7:45 pm
Forum: Grammar
Topic: rather?
Replies: 2
Views: 5423

Actually, rather can mean a reduction in the strength of a meaning, but it can also mean an increase! Either way, this word causes the strength to shift only a shade each way. Because of this, rather is usually more than a little or a bit , but less than quite . For example, to say that someone is r...
by Garzo
Sat Jul 30, 2005 7:30 pm
Forum: Grammar
Topic: like to do different from like doing?
Replies: 15
Views: 20389

The difference between the use of the gerund and the infinitive with the catenative like is so mild that it's probably not a good thing to teach: teaching it might induce more confusion than is necessary. Generally, the infinitive with like implies habitual action: the infinitive is the verbal noun ...
by Garzo
Fri Jul 29, 2005 7:22 pm
Forum: Res Diversae
Topic: Mental leakage reduces efficiency
Replies: 13
Views: 12900

Oh dear, Turkish sounds like Scots Gaelic! I think those languages have very distinctive phonetic palettes, but that's just me. The registering thing is not such a bind: they just want you to tell them where you come from, so they can see how people from different places hear accents. I don't imagin...

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