Search found 137 matches

by Garzo
Sat Jul 09, 2005 11:40 am
Forum: Res Diversae
Topic: new words
Replies: 6
Views: 7009

Ats wai lurnin Inglish iz sow diffikul fur furrinurs. Wee av fownd arsel spellin wurdz ol rong, an it mayks it sow diffikul too prunowns Inglish proplee. Wee drop consnunts ol owvur plays, an wee uree vowlz til ay down get prunownst at ol. It may not bee stanurd Inglish, but it iz fahr eeziur to yoo...
by Garzo
Fri Jul 08, 2005 1:20 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: MAGAZINE
Replies: 6
Views: 8211

The Syriac word ħesnā means fortress or stronghold: from ħsan, to be strong . In Imperial Aramaic, the verb ħăsan (where the very short vowel is marked) appears in the book of Daniel, in the haph'el form haħsēn, meaning to possess . The general Semitic meaning, therefore, seems to be increase of pow...
by Garzo
Fri Jul 08, 2005 7:34 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: AUGHT
Replies: 7
Views: 8210

In northern British English dialects this is usually spelled owt , and is pronounced as out . The corresponding naught is refigured as nowt . It is very common in these dialects, but less so in southern and standard British English. It's only in the south that someone would confuse aught and naught ...
by Garzo
Thu Jul 07, 2005 3:38 pm
Forum: Grammar
Topic: thrice subjunctive
Replies: 21
Views: 29768

Perhaps this is not as odd as it seems. We tend to split apart our spacial and temporal referrences. However, if we consider the English word world , we see that it comes from were- (as in wolf ) and old -- the age of man. The Hebrew `olam ha-ba' is the world to come , which reminds me of the Prayer...
by Garzo
Thu Jul 07, 2005 11:38 am
Forum: Res Diversae
Topic: Katy reaches a milestone
Replies: 20
Views: 22106

The Phrygian cap may have come to symbolize freedom, but it seems that it was the product of the fettered mind -- the ancient Phrygians are said to have practiced head-binding. From early years, an infant's head would be bound by tight strips of cloth to encourage the crown of the head to form into ...
by Garzo
Thu Jul 07, 2005 6:10 am
Forum: Res Diversae
Topic: Katy reaches a milestone
Replies: 20
Views: 22106

Phrygian?
by Garzo
Tue Jul 05, 2005 1:13 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: 日本語の堕
Replies: 16
Views: 23452

What wasn't quite so あっぱれ was the fact that I hadn't read your answers, BD, while I was still trying to figure out the squiggles!

-- Garzo.
by Garzo
Tue Jul 05, 2005 12:39 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: 日本語の堕
Replies: 16
Views: 23452

I do have some old curtains that I need to get rid of, and now I have the small ad to it: The amazing Sunlight Removal Cloth is now available to you. Known throughout Japan as the solution to sunlight glare, and guaranteed to enhance security and privacy in your home, the Sunlight Removal Cloth is n...
by Garzo
Tue Jul 05, 2005 8:24 am
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: 日本語の堕
Replies: 16
Views: 23452

Am I missing something? (1) seems to be about 'injection' something, and have the Japanese perfected a cloth for removing sunlight?

- Garzo.
by Garzo
Mon Jul 04, 2005 1:35 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: YANKEE
Replies: 6
Views: 8338

In Europe, I only hear this word used in a derogatory manner. I am unsure whether this is a feature of the word itself or because of the perceived nature of US foreign policy.
by Garzo
Sat Jul 02, 2005 2:18 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: STANNOUS
Replies: 14
Views: 14416

In Devon and Cornwall, tin mining used to be big business. This was to the extent that certain centres of tin mining were given peculiar administrative provisions, and were called stannary towns, or stannaries. Each stannary was governed by a stannary court - a mini-parliament made up of local tin b...
by Garzo
Fri Jul 01, 2005 1:32 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: MAQUILADORA
Replies: 13
Views: 9590

Hurrah for Katy! Speedily deployed verbage!

There is something about make-up making one artificial. Such beauty is a figment.

-- Garzo.
by Garzo
Fri Jul 01, 2005 10:39 am
Forum: Grammar
Topic: thrice subjunctive
Replies: 21
Views: 29768

I don't know where you get it from, but, Flam, you're spot on. The l`olam `olmin phrase comes at the end of the Syriac Lord's Prayer ( hear it here ). I don't know whether this is a specifically Jewish turn of phrase that carried over into Christian prayer, or whether this was more common currency. ...
by Garzo
Thu Jun 30, 2005 4:44 pm
Forum: Grammar
Topic: thrice subjunctive
Replies: 21
Views: 29768

We glory in your brilliance as we have ever gloried thus.

It be not usual, but it be done!

-- Garzo.
by Garzo
Thu Jun 30, 2005 11:42 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: SIERRA
Replies: 5
Views: 6460

Ah, that is where Italians keep their cuttings!

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