Search found 77 matches

by dsteve54
Sun Aug 23, 2009 6:33 am
Forum: Slang
Topic: "handy" vs. so-called "handy-dandy"
Replies: 6
Views: 11515

"handy" vs. so-called "handy-dandy"

"handy-dandy" Do we sometimes say, "Wait a sec, while I get my handy-dandy Swiss Army knife" just because we like the echoic sound or was it an adaptation by extension of the child's game called "handy-dandy"? Or is it because we are doubling up and saying "handy knife" and "dandy knife" in one fail...
by dsteve54
Wed Aug 12, 2009 3:06 pm
Forum: Grammar
Topic: "much fun" vs. "a lot of fun"
Replies: 6
Views: 20778

skinem wrote:Nah, just the Ernest Hemingway school of writing.

Oh, that and being in a hurry...
That was very cute!
by dsteve54
Tue Aug 11, 2009 12:24 pm
Forum: Grammar
Topic: "much fun" vs. "a lot of fun"
Replies: 6
Views: 20778

skinem wrote:English is tough.
Some things just are.
Learn them.
Accept them.
Live them.
I don't know much about haiku, but if it is not already the right meter, you could probably do a tweak here and there and have one. :D
by dsteve54
Tue Jun 30, 2009 2:52 am
Forum: Slang
Topic: Rats!
Replies: 17
Views: 23163

Oh no...I write this, supposedly in response to bnjtokyo { It did not dawn on me to think "way" back to gangsters...although I was familiar with James Cagney (e.g. "You dirty rat; you ....".) } ...What in the heck am I talking about? This does not even fit any of the responses that bnjtokyo made.......
by dsteve54
Mon Jun 29, 2009 10:39 pm
Forum: Slang
Topic: Rats!
Replies: 17
Views: 23163

Thanks! Wow, I was waaaaaaaaaaaay off on this one.....I was thinking more along the lines of the Black Death (Bubonic Plague)....finally, I realized that at the time that was happening, they did not know WHAT was causing it...perhaps an "ether", etc. It did not dawn on me to think "way" back to gang...
by dsteve54
Mon Jun 29, 2009 4:43 pm
Forum: Slang
Topic: Rats!
Replies: 17
Views: 23163

Rats!

Why do we exclaim "Rats!" when something goes awry! I was talking via IM with my friend in St. Petersburg (Russia), mainly in Russian, but something I was doing was not working and I suddenly "said", "Rats!". She responds, "Rats????????" (it is LITERALLY "крысы!!!!" in Russian, but to them, that is ...
by dsteve54
Sun Jun 21, 2009 3:57 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: I have a definion but not the word...
Replies: 4
Views: 2615

???metonymy??? Oh, rats, I don't know!!! These are terms that are reasonable to create. I was looking for a term that illustrates the *fallacious nature* of defining an entire category by a an instance of that category when the instance does not embody the full meaning of the category. Analogous to ...
by dsteve54
Sun Jun 21, 2009 3:47 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: I have a definion but not the word...
Replies: 4
Views: 2615

Re: Looking for a Word

The use of a part to define a whole is synecdoche but I I'm not sure that DSteve is looking for that word. Converting a proper noun to a common noun, such as Kleenex to kleenex (if that has finally occurred) or Aspirin (Bayer trademark originally) to aspirin is called commonization . The original n...
by dsteve54
Sat Jun 20, 2009 1:24 am
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: I have a definion but not the word...
Replies: 4
Views: 2615

I have a definion but not the word...

Can you tell me a word that describes this situation. I think there is a word for it but I am not sure. Or perhaps this is one instance of something that would be characterized by such a word. I just cannot think of it, or maybe I never knew of it in the first place Let us say we have a definition t...
by dsteve54
Mon Jun 08, 2009 5:01 pm
Forum: Grammar
Topic: "much fun" vs. "a lot of fun"
Replies: 6
Views: 20778

I hope that someone can give you the answer. I so often find that I know what the correct usage is, without a clue as to why. Other languages are so much more systematic in their grammer. So true.... Well, in particular, it is embarrassing to explain English phonetics, which, unless one is steeped ...
by dsteve54
Sun Jun 07, 2009 7:04 pm
Forum: Grammar
Topic: "much fun" vs. "a lot of fun"
Replies: 6
Views: 20778

"much fun" vs. "a lot of fun"

A Russian pen pal wrote to me, stating in the course of the narrative: "I have much fun learning....". I was trying to explain in Russian why, in this particular context, we say "I have a lot of fun learning" or "I have quite a bit of fun learning", but "I have much fun" is alien. To be honest, I no...
by dsteve54
Sun May 03, 2009 6:23 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: gloss
Replies: 2
Views: 1963

gloss

"gloss".....I am only posing the word as a topic for Dr. Goodwood to discuss in a "Word of the Day", since this is the "Suggestion" section. I probably won't track additions to this thread, so I won't comment further, but if you wish, have at it. I am referring to the meaning of "gloss" other than "...
by dsteve54
Sun May 03, 2009 6:11 am
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Does anyone know the Russian word for kadigan (or cadigan)?
Replies: 12
Views: 15039

One thing I came up with is that cadigan appears to be itself. The only definition I found is that it is a word for thingamabob, which makes it a tautology, no? A word can't be its own definition, can it? I did NOT know that about so-called "cadigan", and as such, I would agree with you. My friend ...
by dsteve54
Tue Apr 28, 2009 4:41 am
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Does anyone know the Russian word for kadigan (or cadigan)?
Replies: 12
Views: 15039

It seems to me that kadigan/cadigan is a recently coined technical term in English. I personally have never encountered it before, and the term are not defined in any of the major dictionaries (Webster's et al.). The internet suggests it was coined in the 1960's and used to denote a sematic categor...
by dsteve54
Mon Apr 27, 2009 12:13 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Does anyone know the Russian word for kadigan (or cadigan)?
Replies: 12
Views: 15039

I don't know if this website is helpful, but they say they a have a word for you: Website: http://dic.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/2490462 Word and examples: * In Russian, fillers are called "слова-паразиты" (vermin words); the most common are "Э-э" (eh), "это" (this), "того" (that), "ну" (well), "зн...

Go to advanced search