Search found 77 matches

by dsteve54
Sat Apr 25, 2009 6:58 am
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Does anyone know the Russian word for kadigan (or cadigan)?
Replies: 12
Views: 15050

By the way, even though I am looking for the RUSSIAN word for "cadigan/kadigan/placeholder name", let me give you some examples of such in USA: John Doe Jane Doe thingamajig doohickey widget Tom, Dick, and Harry Joe Blow "Joe the Plumber" ha ha ha ha Joe Public Tweedledum and Tweedledee Anytown, USA...
by dsteve54
Sat Apr 25, 2009 6:42 am
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Does anyone know the Russian word for kadigan (or cadigan)?
Replies: 12
Views: 15050

cadigan/kadigan vs CARDIGAN

Collins Russian Gem Dictionary suggests вязаная жакетка, which I slightly doubt. Going via Swedish kofta , which clearly is a cardigan, I think кофта will work. Thank you for your response, but you mistook my question for asking about "caRdigan", which is a type of sweater. I was asking about kadig...
by dsteve54
Mon Mar 23, 2009 8:00 pm
Forum: Suggestions
Topic: Text Appearence
Replies: 54
Views: 110745

In terms of readability in terms of font size, type, and layout against the motif, I like it very much. In that respect I have no complaints. Ok, I will admit, I am not very good with bulletin boards and markups and maybe I am missing a capability with the tags available at top. In MS WORD, I someti...
by dsteve54
Mon Mar 23, 2009 7:39 pm
Forum: Grammar
Topic: "not all that" vs "not very"
Replies: 2
Views: 4920

Very good. Thank you!

For some reason, I just could not frame the situations myself. But your comment clarifies them for me.

As a bonus, thank you for the Russian versions! I was trying to decide if the one would involve "все так" or "так уж", and you were able to provide that for me.
by dsteve54
Mon Mar 23, 2009 11:38 am
Forum: Grammar
Topic: "not all that" vs "not very"
Replies: 2
Views: 4920

"not all that" vs "not very"

We typically (at least in common parlance) say the following: "I (really) don't go shopping all that much." and "I (really) don't go shopping very much." I can see both scenarios in the New Oxford American Dictionary; however, I am not sure if one is considered more informal than the other. Or are t...
by dsteve54
Sat Sep 20, 2008 3:44 am
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Does anyone know the Russian word for kadigan (or cadigan)?
Replies: 12
Views: 15050

Does anyone know the Russian word for kadigan (or cadigan)?

Does anyone know the Russian word for kadigan (or cadigan)?
by dsteve54
Sat Dec 08, 2007 7:29 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Not a good m.o. for 2nd lang acquisition, but interesting
Replies: 2
Views: 6222

Not a good m.o. for 2nd lang acquisition, but interesting

Not recommended as a way to improve one's non-native language, but an interesting article:

http://www.news.com.au/story/0,23599,22 ... om=mostpop
by dsteve54
Sun Nov 25, 2007 9:34 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Non-native English speakers' emphatic method
Replies: 22
Views: 25724

Sometimes I smile when I read someone's thread and the entire question or issue is bypassed in favor of some grammar discussion. So the entire crux of the issue might never be ultimately entertained, and the creator is just left dangling in the wake of a hijacked thread. By no means do I feel "singl...
by dsteve54
Sun Nov 25, 2007 9:04 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Non-native English speakers' emphatic method
Replies: 22
Views: 25724

Then, I am taking by surprise sometimes, [snip] It just causes me to smile. dsteve, I'd let this go if your topic wasn't unexpected English. So I must ask: does "I am taking by surprise" indicate that you are in a perpetual, active state of being "taken by surprise"? (Or is it just a mondegreen?) :...
by dsteve54
Sun Nov 25, 2007 6:58 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Non-native English speakers' emphatic method
Replies: 22
Views: 25724

Then there is the free use of gerunds as though the mentioned activity is continually ongoing. I believe this is not such a popular thread but I'm trying. mark maybe-we're-too-insular Bailey I need to get out more and acquaint myself with mini-mart workers Thanks for your input. For one thing, I do...
by dsteve54
Sun Nov 25, 2007 6:52 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Non-native English speakers' emphatic method
Replies: 22
Views: 25724

The word/phrase OK is often used to indicate comprehension. That is a simple but interesting observation with reference to the mentioned context. Even though the non-native speaker may just use it as an indication that they are receiving your message, Americans might expect a trailer sometimes, esp...
by dsteve54
Thu Nov 22, 2007 5:54 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Non-native English speakers' emphatic method
Replies: 22
Views: 25724

I forgot to mention that the same contingent of people are likely to respond with this phrase, when told some bad news: "Ok, that is not a good one." Why the "ok", I don't know; it must be a universal word people feel they must throw in. Once again, there is the ubiquitous "one" word extraneously em...
by dsteve54
Mon Nov 19, 2007 6:32 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Non-native English speakers' emphatic method
Replies: 22
Views: 25724

Non-native English speakers' emphatic method

I happen to know some people from Russia, Bangalore, and Saudi Arabia; they have various degrees of English competence. For some reason, the following scenario comes up frequently. The person is trying to make a point, and is pausing for effect. In America, we might say something like: "Consider thi...
by dsteve54
Mon Nov 19, 2007 6:03 pm
Forum: Slang
Topic: Another one heard from a rural Missourian
Replies: 11
Views: 17820

Another one heard from a rural Missourian

Somebody with a Missouri background (rural) happened to be talking with me about a guy who was really skinny. He happened to say parenthetically that "he could tread water in a garden hose". I thought it conjured up a vivid image. I searched this site and saw no reference, so I thought I would serve...
by dsteve54
Tue Nov 06, 2007 11:05 pm
Forum: Slang
Topic: Where do yikes and other small interjections come from
Replies: 16
Views: 32214

Reading about these animal sounds did cause my thoughts to drift as to how one might say the sound of a watch or clock in other languages. We would say "tick-tock" in English ( I GUESS it is spelled "tock"?!?!); I was trying to figure out how to say it in Russian. If one says "tock", it would be int...

Go to advanced search