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by Slava
Mon Jun 16, 2008 7:59 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: SOS
Replies: 11
Views: 5070

Interesting article on this on the Beeb:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/7444184.stm
by Slava
Mon Jun 16, 2008 5:34 pm
Forum: Suggestions
Topic: Pronunciation
Replies: 2
Views: 8984

Stargzer wrote: -- a nun back in grade school correcting someone by saying, "You have the em-FAH-sys on the wrong si-LAH-ble."


Then the Nun should have sent you to find a good dic-SHON-ary.
by Slava
Mon Jun 16, 2008 5:25 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Non-native English speakers' emphatic method
Replies: 22
Views: 24598

One of a million (milliard?) of the variations between two countries separated by only a common language. Isn't milliard what us Americans call a billion? It is in Russian, at least. And, speaking of Americans, I used to use the word Merkins a lot. I don't anymore, now that I know that it has a rea...
by Slava
Mon Jun 16, 2008 4:53 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Non-native English speakers' emphatic method
Replies: 22
Views: 24598

One difference in emphasis is especially noticeable in the past tenses. The Brits use "has" more than Americans. For example, one modern textbook I was using had, as a way of demonstrating various tenses, a dog running through a park causing havoc. One of the pictures was of a boy, fallen ...
by Slava
Mon Jun 16, 2008 9:25 am
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: esculent
Replies: 5
Views: 2997

So I guess esculent comestibles would be a repetitive redundancy.
by Slava
Sat Jun 14, 2008 10:22 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Vorpal
Replies: 1
Views: 2169

Vorpal

Definition: deadly Etymology: created by Lewis Carroll to describe a sword Webster's New Millennium™ Dictionary of English, Preview Edition (v 0.9.7) Copyright © 2003-2008 Lexico Publishing Group, LLC Recently found in: President Medvedev's juridical minions did indeed begin brandishing a vorpal swo...
by Slava
Fri Jun 13, 2008 10:59 am
Forum: Res Diversae
Topic: For those who know everything
Replies: 3
Views: 4939

I'm not sure about the value of the brand name, but the most recognized symbol in the world is the Golden Arches of McD's. Not the cross of the Catholic church. Also, along the lines of the oak tree needing to hit 50 before it can have little acorns: I took a forest guided tour in Finland, and learn...
by Slava
Mon Jun 09, 2008 4:08 pm
Forum: Good Word Discussion
Topic: HARBINGER
Replies: 2
Views: 2205

Not that they are related, but do they habitually serve eggplant in French inns?

Slava
by Slava
Sun Jun 08, 2008 4:42 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Non-native English speakers' emphatic method
Replies: 22
Views: 24598

To resurrect this topic a bit, find a Brit and ask if those phrases sound right. When I was teaching English in Moscow, all the textbooks were 40-50-year old British English texts. I had to learn almost as much as my students.
by Slava
Sun Jun 08, 2008 4:36 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: "Foreign" language anomalies
Replies: 19
Views: 30997

While I was living in Russia, the lime appeared for the first time. As the Russians didn't know much about them, they called them green lemons.

Most Russians I knew also couldn't tell the difference between Coke and Pepsi, either.
by Slava
Fri Jun 06, 2008 5:07 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: oubliette
Replies: 7
Views: 5166

Let's not forget the pit into which a very young Jennifer Connelly falls in the movie Labyrinth. I think that may even be where I learned this word.
by Slava
Fri Jun 06, 2008 4:38 pm
Forum: Languages of the World
Topic: Rewelt
Replies: 5
Views: 11043

Rewelt

This word appears nearly exclusively on the Moscow Times website (http://www.themoscowtimes.com), a supposedly English language site in the weather section. I think they think it means Relative Humidity, but cannot confirm that via on-line dictionaries. Does anyone out there have a clue? Thanks in a...
by Slava
Sat Apr 26, 2008 7:49 pm
Forum: Res Diversae
Topic: Another lost positive
Replies: 4
Views: 5229

Perhaps your brother meant, "We need to get cracking."
by Slava
Sat Apr 19, 2008 4:05 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Fond
Replies: 1
Views: 1813

Fond

fond (fŏnd) adj., fond·er, fond·est. 1. Having a strong liking, inclination, or affection: fond of ballet; fond of my nieces and nephews. 2. Affectionate; tender: a fond embrace. 3. Immoderately affectionate or indulgent; doting: fond grandparents who tended to spoil the child. 4. Cherished; de...
by Slava
Thu Apr 17, 2008 2:22 pm
Forum: Good Word Suggestions
Topic: Fraught
Replies: 1
Views: 1851

Fraught

I've almost always used this one with "with," so I'm often thrown a bit when it's used alone. However, it's a great one, I do believe. From Merriam-Webster: 1archaic a: laden b: well supplied or provided 2: full of or accompanied by something specified —used with with<a situation fraught w...

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