Pilgrim

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Dr. Goodword
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Pilgrim

Postby Dr. Goodword » Wed Nov 25, 2020 7:48 pm

• pilgrim •


Pronunciation: pil-grêm • Hear it!

Part of Speech: Noun

Meaning: 1. A vagabond, wanderer, wayfarer, traveler. 2. A religious devotee who travels a long distance to a sacred site.

Notes: Every Thanksgiving (except in 2020) people in the United States make pilgrimages homeward to spend the holiday their families. As you can see, pilgrims make pilgrimages. We may also pilgrimage to a special site, using the noun as a verb without any prefix or suffix.
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In Play: The austere Puritans who founded Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1620 were called 'pilgrims' because they fled religious persecution in England to a new home in America. The term was first applied in Governor William Bradford's Journal Of Plimouth Plantation, written between 1630 and 1650, then popularized in Cotton Mather's Magnalia Christi Americana (1702). Only half the 102 original Pilgrims survived their first winter at Plymouth. They, with strong support of local Native Americans, survived to multiply and, joined by many others over the succeeding years, spread across the continent to build a nation.

Word History: I'm sure you've always wondered what falcons and pilgrims have in common. Today we find out. Pilgrim is a folk etymological rendering of Old French peligrin, since pil(l) and grim are true English words. Old French inherited the word from Latin peregrinus "foreign, strange", an adjective derived from pereger "abroad, away". Pereger was originally a compound comprising per "through, beyond" + ager "land, field", also found in agriculture. The root behind ager came through the Germanic line to English acre. The peregrine falcon's name came from a Latin phrase, 'falco peregrinus', so named because they were captured during migration rather than taken from their nest as fledglings.
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wordlady1
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Re: Pilgrim

Postby wordlady1 » Fri Nov 27, 2020 4:48 am

The support of the Pilgrims by the Wampanoag was short-lived, as the Pilgrims robbed the tribe of their land, considered them lesser than white humans, and decimated their population with disease. The Wampanoag today consider Thanksgiving as a day of mourning rather than a cause for celebration.

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LukeJavan8
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Re: Pilgrim

Postby LukeJavan8 » Fri Nov 27, 2020 1:41 pm

Native quote seen on a T shirt here on a reservation:

The only promise they kept: to take our land.
-----please, draw me a sheep-----

Philip Hudson
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Re: Pilgrim

Postby Philip Hudson » Mon Nov 30, 2020 2:16 pm

Do you know why the Massachusetts Pilgrims are the symbol of Thanksgiving day? It is because it is in the North. Jamestown had thanksgiving too. Neither folks are very commendable in my estimation. The Massachusetts Pilgrims came for THEIR freedom of religion. They tolerated no other. Both North and South took advantage of the friendly Amerinds and then sold them blankets saturated with the smallpox virus.

I am thankful to God every day.
It is dark at night, but the Sun will come up and then we can see.

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LukeJavan8
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Re: Pilgrim

Postby LukeJavan8 » Mon Nov 30, 2020 4:25 pm

Totally am in agreement with you.
-----please, draw me a sheep-----


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