BOXING DAY

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sluggo
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BOXING DAY

Postby sluggo » Fri Dec 26, 2008 11:56 am

Doc may be boxing, so here relayed from the front page:

Boxing Day

Pronunciation: bahk-sing day • Hear it!

Part of Speech: Noun phrase

Meaning: No, it isn't a day we traditionally get into the ring, though children overjoyed at the bounty of Christmas might have gotten a boxing of the ears in days past. It is the first weekday following Christmas, the traditional day for giving gifts to servants and employees in the English-speaking world.

Notes
: Throughout the UK, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada, December 26 is still an official holiday. If the day after Christmas is Saturday or Sunday, Boxing Day is the following Monday.

In Play: Boxing Day is also known as the Feast of St. Stephen, named for the first Christian martyr. It originated in 19th century England under Queen Victoria, when it was the day "on which postmen, errand boys, and servants of various kinds received a Christmas box of contributions from those whom they serve" in the words of Charles Dickens. If you come from one of the unfortunate English-speaking nations that does not recognize Boxing Day, just remember that it comes right after "unboxing" day, Christmas.

Word History: Boxing Day is probably the day after Christmas because servants often worked on Christmas. It was called "Boxing Day" because it was the day when a box was filled with Christmas gifts and delivered to service providers. (We hope that our old friend Grogie of the Alpha Agora has had another wonderful holiday as a reward for suggesting today's very topical, seasonal phrase several years ago.)
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Slava
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Postby Slava » Thu Feb 11, 2010 10:45 pm

One of our regular words, it gets done every year. Replies and discussions are in several places. Here they are:

2006: http://www.alphadictionary.com/bb/viewt ... ght=boxing

2007: http://www.alphadictionary.com/bb/viewt ... ght=boxing

and: http://www.alphadictionary.com/bb/viewt ... ght=boxing

It looks like it got posted twice, once with a small "b", once with a capital. Strange that it should make any difference, as it doesn't in searches. Computers, go figure.

2009: http://www.alphadictionary.com/bb/viewt ... ght=boxing

This one from 2008 and the post from 2005 went without comment.
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beck123
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Postby beck123 » Thu Feb 11, 2010 11:26 pm

In the U.S., one of those "unfortunate English-speaking nations," Boxing Day precedes Divorce Day by about three months.
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beck123
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Postby beck123 » Thu Feb 11, 2010 11:36 pm

the traditional day for giving gifts to servants and employees in the English-speaking world
The vast bulk of the English-speaking world is the U.S., where this tradition is not the case, and where most people find the very concept of "servants" a little bit distasteful. So it may be more properly defined as "the traditional day for giving gifts to servants and employees out on the margins of the English-speaking world."
Beck

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LukeJavan8
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Fri Feb 12, 2010 1:20 pm

I think that says it better.

And somewhere else it was mentioned by yourself, I
believe, that it often misunderstood as the day
after Christmas when presents are "boxed" to be
'returned".
-----please, draw me a sheep-----

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beck123
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Postby beck123 » Fri Feb 12, 2010 5:08 pm

That was not I. But if nobody else claims it, I shall, because it's a reasonably good joke.
Beck

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LukeJavan8
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Mon Feb 15, 2010 1:52 pm

There are so many "types" of English today;
American English, South African English,
Canadian English, Indian English, Australian
English, et. al., it is interesting that if that
part of New York remained English would
they and we be celebrating "Boxing Day".
The idea of servants and gifting them is not
too prevalent in America, but I bet it is still
in some of these other places. Indians were
used as servants and even slaves many places
in early days. I know it is listed on calendars
as still a holiday in Canada.

Interestingly according to this site:
http://www.calendar-updates.com/info/ho ... oxing.aspx
it is the biggest shopping day in Canada. Lots of
sales and activities. I wonder how many people
from "finger lakes' area go across the border
to get 'specials"?
-----please, draw me a sheep-----

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beck123
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Postby beck123 » Mon Feb 15, 2010 8:03 pm

Putting on my cladist hat and assuming the custom developed in England, I see two possibilities at first glance. First, the custom developed after 1776 and was not transmitted to America but was transmitted to the remaining British colonies in Canada, Australia, and elsewhere. Second, the custom existed prior to 1776 and was intentionally rejected by the non-servant-oriented U.S.

There's every possibility that I'm totally mistaken, but it's a reasonable proposition.
Beck

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Slava
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Postby Slava » Mon Feb 15, 2010 8:33 pm

beck123 wrote:Putting on my cladist hat and assuming the custom developed in England, I see two possibilities at first glance. First, the custom developed after 1776 and was not transmitted to America but was transmitted to the remaining British colonies in Canada, Australia, and elsewhere. Second, the custom existed prior to 1776 and was intentionally rejected by the non-servant-oriented U.S.

There's every possibility that I'm totally mistaken, but it's a reasonable proposition.
I'll put in my vote for the second option. It makes more sense.

I had to look up your fourth word there. Nice one. Better a cladist than a sadist, I'd say.

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beck123
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Postby beck123 » Mon Feb 15, 2010 9:08 pm

Cladistics is big doin's in biology these last few decades. I like expanding these technical terms into more general usage, but I'm sure you've noticed that already.
Beck

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Slava
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Postby Slava » Mon Feb 15, 2010 9:12 pm

beck123 wrote:Cladistics is big doin's in biology these last few decades. I like expanding these technical terms into more general usage, but I'm sure you've noticed that already.
Always a pleasure to expand one's vocabulary and other forms of knowledge. It's an infinite process. It can go on forever, too. Almost as if there were no end.

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LukeJavan8
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Mon Feb 15, 2010 9:25 pm

-----please, draw me a sheep-----

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beck123
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Postby beck123 » Mon Feb 15, 2010 10:41 pm

Slava wrote:It's an infinite process. It can go on forever, too. Almost as if there were no end.
My Goodness! Are these the seeds of ironic hyperbole? I've never seen a post of yours more than merely dundant. Way to go, S!
Beck

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Slava
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Postby Slava » Mon Feb 15, 2010 10:48 pm

beck123 wrote:
Slava wrote:It's an infinite process. It can go on forever, too. Almost as if there were no end.
My Goodness! Are these the seeds of ironic hyperbole? I've never seen a post of yours more than merely dundant. Way to go, S!
If it's language oriented, my prolix verbosity can at times be superabundant in its superfluity. I'm usually a tad more reticent, however. I often keep mum. Or even don't say anything at all.

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beck123
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Postby beck123 » Mon Feb 15, 2010 11:20 pm

Keeping mum is often a better choice than posting mummery. Keeping mums is another matter altogether.
Beck

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