Paradigm

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Dr. Goodword
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Paradigm

Postby Dr. Goodword » Thu Nov 16, 2017 11:22 pm

• paradigm •


Pronunciation: pæ-rê-daim • Hear it!

Part of Speech: Noun

Meaning: 1. A theoretical framework or model which includes several different theories all bound together by a set of shared assumptions. 2. A set of all the inflectional forms of a word presented as a grammatical category, e.g. a declension or conjugation. 3. A prime example, a pattern, as 'the company is a paradigm of small businesses'.

Notes: We have a caveat in this word: although the final syllable is pronounced like dime with a silent E, it is actually spelled digm with a silent G, because the clusters GM and GN (sign) are not permitted at the end of an English word. It is permitted with a following vowel, as in the adjective paradigmatic and the verb, paradigmatize.

In Play: Let's try the new sense of today's word first: "Lollapalooza, Louisiana, is the paradigm of a small-town community." The standard meaning is used mostly by scientists: "Seamus Allgood's theory of bird migrations falls outside the most widely accepted theoretical paradigm. He hopes to set a new paradigm."

Word History: This word was borrowed from Late Latin paradigma "pattern, example", borrowed from Greek paradeigma, the noun for paradeiknunai "to compare". This verb comprises two components, para "alongside" + deiknunai "to show". Greek inherited the root its verb from PIE deik/doik- "to show", which made it to Latin as dicere "to say". The root of this word appears in English borrowings from Latin-French in diction, predict, and others. English ditto is the past participle of Italian dire "to say" of the same source. Ditty "simple song" was borrowed by Middle English from Old French as dite "said" from dire "to say". Ditto. The original PIE word reached English directly through its Old Germanic connections as teach. (Thank you, Perry Lassiter, the paradigm of an Alpha Agora contributor, for recommending today's Good Word.)
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Perry Lassiter
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Re: Paradigm

Postby Perry Lassiter » Sat Nov 18, 2017 10:16 pm

I'm still struggling with the pronunciation to rhyme with dime, which I first remember hearing less than 20 years ago. I had always called it to rhyme with dim. Anybody else use it that way?
pl

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Slava
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Re: Paradigm

Postby Slava » Wed Jan 17, 2018 8:02 pm

Not I.
Life is like playing chess with chessmen who each have thoughts and feelings and motives of their own.

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Dr. Goodword
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Re: Paradigm

Postby Dr. Goodword » Wed Jan 17, 2018 11:46 pm

Rhyme was originally spelled rime, as in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. The spelling was intentionally changed by classicists who associated the word with rhythm from Classical Latin, which borrowed it from Greek.
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George Kovac
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Re: Paradigm

Postby George Kovac » Thu Jan 18, 2018 11:00 am

Dr. Goodword wrote:

Rhyme was originally spelled rime, as in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.


Here is another classic poem title to use as a mnemonic for the proper pronunciation of the Goodword: “Paradigm Lost”
“The messy layers of human experience get pulled together, and sometimes ordered, by words.” Colum McCann “But Always Meeting Ourselves” New York Times, June 15, 2009


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